Wednesday Whatever (for now…) – Misc. Bird Omens

February 4, 2009 at 4:06 pm (Beltane, Birds, Folklore, History, Lore, Magic, Omens, pagan, Wednesday, Wisdom, Witch)

Since spring is nigh – really, it is! Just ‘cuz we have a foot of snow doesn’t mean it isn’t coming! – I figured this would be fairly appropriate, since the birds will soon be returning to the now colder climes 🙂

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Some Misc. Bird Omens
From various sources, all unknown

When you hear a cuckoo for the first time in the year, quote aloud:

“Cuckoo, Cuckoo, answer me true
This question that I’m asking you;
I beg that truly you’ll tell me
In how many years I’ll be married.”

The number of times which the cuckoo replies is declared to represents the number of years that will elapse before you marry.

A bird that flies into a house, foretells an important message. The white bird foretells death, and a Blue Jay spends Fridays with the Devil, telling on us.

A bird call from the north means tragedy; from the south is good for crops; from the west is good luck; from the east, good love.

*Storks deliver babies. Storks were sacred to Venus in Roman mythology. If a stork builds a nest on your roof, you have received a blessing and a promise of never ending love from Venus. Aristotle made killing a stork a crime, and Romans passed a stork law, saying that children must care for their elderly parents.

A wish made on the first robin of spring will be granted.

A peacock feather has an evil eye at the end. Argus, the Greek legend, says a hundred eyed monster was turned into a peacock with all it’s eyes in it’s tail.

It is regarded as lucky if a bird flying overhead makes a mess on you. (The big blue bird of happiness shitting all over you..? LOL)

Hearing a cuckoo calling after the end of July is a bad omen.

Killing a robin or a sea gull is also very unlucky.

If rooks build a nest near your house, it is thought to bring luck. Likewise, to have a swallow’s nest under your eaves is very lucky.

If the Robin sings in the bush,
The weather will be coarse.
If the Robin sings on the barn,
The weather will be warm.

If a swallow doth build upon your thatch,
Then the hand of good is upon the latch!
Plenty he will bring to house and field,
Of the fruits of the garden an uncommon yield.

When the swallow’s nest is high, summer is dry;
When the swallow’s nest is low, you can safely reap and sow.

If a sparrow doth perch beneath your thrall (eaves),
Then presage of woe, woe to all:
Trouble he will bring to field and store,
Death and destruction will enter your door.

To hear the cackle of a goose,
Betokens gifts of price and use.

When a peacock’s distant voice you hear
Are you in need of rain?Rejoice, ’tis here!

Crow on a fence,
Rain will go hence.
Crow on the ground,
Rain will come down.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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