Monday Make A – Children’s Activities for Yule

November 16, 2009 at 11:32 am (Children, Crafts, Magic, Monday, pagan, Yule)

Children’s Activities for Yule
From The Celtic Connection

Yule is a Sabbat to welcome back the Sun King. The sun is vital to all that exist on Earth. It is the giver of light and warmth, and causes the rebirth of this past years crops by warming and gently coaxing the seeds that have been sleeping underground during the winter. Traditional methods of celebrating this Sabbat are mostly inside activities.

Yule Log Hike
Materials:

  • Warm Clothes
  • Sense of Adventure.

This is an activity that can be done the weekend before Yule. On a bright crisp morning, dress the family warmly and head for the park, mountains, or beach. As you hike along, looking for that special Yule log to place in your hearth, also be looking for decorations to make it personalized by each member of the family. Select a proportionally sized log that will fit easily into your fire place. Ash, oak, or cedar make great Yule logs. Try to find one that has already fallen and is on the ground. On the beach, driftwood can be found and obtained for your log. As you are looking, or on your way back home look for natural decorations to adorn your Yule log with. Traditional adornments are, pine cones, leaves, holly sprigs, mistletoe sprigs, rosebuds, winter flowers, wheat stalks, and corn husks. If you must cut anything from a living plant, remember to ask and thank the plant for its gift. If you don’t have a fire place, select a smaller log, slightly flat on one side so that it doesn’t roll. Adorning the logs will appear farther along in the activities. (Explain how the Yule log was set ablaze on Solstice night to help vanquish the dark and add strength to the returning sun.)

Sun Welcoming Center Pieces
Materials:

  • Flat or bowled wicker basket
  • Evergreen Boughs
  • Oranges and Apples
  • Whole Cloves
  • Walnuts
  • Hazelnuts
  • Wheat Stalks
  • Flour
  • Red, Green, and Gold Bows or String.

Children of all ages will delight in both making and giving these delightful center pieces. Place the basket in the center of the table. Lay a couple of evergreen boughs (can be found at most Christmas tree lots) in bottom of basket so that the tips flow out from all sides. Spike the oranges all the way around with several whole cloves. Arrange the oranges and apples on top of the boughs. Arrange in a couple of the walnuts and hazel nuts. Place a couple of the wheat stalks standing up amidst the fruit. Lightly dust with flour. Tie bows to the handle and outside the basket. Tell children about each special part of the centerpiece. Explain that the baskets were used during the harvests during the season before. The evergreen boughs are symbols of immortality, reminding us that the Sun King is not dead, but reappears at Yule each year to lengthen, brighten and warm the days ahead. The oranges and apples are symbols of the Sun King, The nuts symbolize the seeds as they lay sleeping and awaiting the Sun King’s return. The wheat stalks symbolize the yearly harvests and the flour represents the triumph of the forces of light and life.)

Sun Bursting Ornaments
Materials:

  • Ruler or Compass
  • Scissors
  • Thin Cardboard
  • Gold Foil Paper
  • Glue Stick
  • Heavy Thread and Needle.

Help child cut out a 4" cardboard circle. With this template, the child can then trace and cut out 14 circles from the foil paper. One by one, fold a circle in half, half, and half again. Unfold the circle and cut along the fold lines, stopping about 1/2 inch from the center. Repeat until all the circles are cut. Form the points of the Sun Burst by wrapping each of the eight segments around the point of a sharpened pencil. Point of pencil should face away from the center of the circle. Secure each point with a dab of glue. Thread a needle with 18" length of thread. Insert the needle through all the centers of the circles from the foil side of the first seven and the plain side of the last seven. Gently pull the circles together, bunching them into a ball. Tie off with a knot, and use the excess thread to form a loop for hanging the ornament. (Hang up in windows to reflect the sunlight or on tree for decoration, explain to children how the sun gets stronger, climbs higher, and last longer in the sky each day starting at Yule.)

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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