Wednesday What Herb Is This-Mistletoe

November 18, 2009 at 11:24 am (Christmas, Herbs, Magic, pagan, Wednesday, Winter, Witch, Yule)

Mistletoe
by Sarah the SwampWitch
Originally written for and posted to the Witches Three list.

  • Tree of the day after the Winter Solstice (Aprox. December 23)
  • Latin name: Viscum Album
  • Celtic name: It is said that Mistletoe is too sacred to have a written word
  • Common or Folk names: Mistletoe, Birdlime, All Heal, Golden Bough, Loranthaceae Phoradendron flavescens
  • Parts Used: leaves, berries, twigs

Herbal Uses: **CAUTION: Mistletoe berries are extremely poisonous and have been known to cause miscarriage.** Mistletoe can be used as a stimulant to soothe muscles and to produce a rise in blood pressure. It increases the contraction of the uterus and intestine. Mistletoe has been recommended as an oxytocic in postpartum hemorrhage and menorrhagia. It is also used as a circulatory and uterine stimulant. This plant can induce menstruation. It has shown effective in treating tumors in some animals. It is recommended that due to the toxicity of this plant that ingestion of this herb be avoided.

Magickal History & Associations: Mistletoe is one of the Druid’s most sacred trees – as Ovid said, "Ad viscum Druidae cantare solebant. (The Druids are wont to sing to the Mistletoe.)." In Druidic lore Mistletoe is an herb of the Winter Solstice and is the special plant for the day after Yule. The Druids gathered their Mistletoe at Midsummer or at the 6th day of the moon. The Druid priests or priestesses would wear white robes while gathering the plant and would use a golden knife, taking extreme care not to let the plant touch the ground. Two oxen were often sacrificed for the harvest. The Druids considered that the Mistletoe that grew on Oak trees was the most potent and sacred.

Mistletoe is a plant of the sun and also of the planet of Jupiter. It is associated with the element of the air. The colors of Mistletoe are green, gold and white, and its herb is hyssop. The gemstones associated with Mistletoe are Black Quartz, Amber, Pearl and green Obsidian. Mistletoe has the immortal creature the Gryphon-Eagle associated with it and also the plain eagle is its bird association. There are many deities associated with Mistletoe: Loki, Blader, Hercules, Shu, Osirus, and Aeneas are a few of those deities.

Magickal uses: Romans, Celtics, and Germans believed that mistletoe is the key to the supernatural. Mistletoe will aid and strengthen all magical works but is best called upon for healing, protection, and beautiful dreams – dreams which will unlock the secrets of immortality. Mistletoe is a good wood to use for making wands, other ritual tools and magical rings.

The Berries are used in love incenses, plus a few berries can be added to the ritual cup at a handfasting. Boughs of Mistletoe can be hung for all purpose protection around the house. Sprigs of Mistletoe can be carried as an herb of protection – plus amulets and jewelry can be made out of Mistletoe wood as protective talismans. Hung over the cradle, Mistletoe will protect the child from being stolen by the fey and Mistletoe that is carried will protect the bearer from werewolves. Mistletoe stood for sex and fertility – hence our tradition of kissing under the mistletoe. It is traditionally hung in the home at Yule, and those who walk under it exchange a kiss of peace.

Sources:

Year of Moons, Season of Trees, by Pattalee Glass-Koentop
Tree Medicine Tree Magic by Ellen Evert Hopman
A Druid’s Herbal by Ellen Evert Hopman
Celtic Astrology by Helena Paterson
Glamoury – Magic of the Celtic Green World by Steve Blamires
The Book of Druidry by Ross Nichols

Document Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002,2003 by Sarah Nunn (Sarah the SwampWitch). This document can be re-published and shared only as long as no information is lost or changed, credit is given to the author, and it is provided or used without cost to others. Other uses of this document must be approved in writing by Sarah Nunn. Btw, this material is Hex Protected, and if it is ‘shared’ without accreditation the person doing so will be sorry.
🙂

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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