Thursday This is Your Spell – Money, Money Spell

February 4, 2010 at 10:40 am (Candle, Magic, Money, pagan, prosperity, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Money, Money Spell
Source Unknown

This may be done at any time, but preferably at the same time each day or night. Needed:

  • A Green Candle
  • White Candle
  • Money Drawing Oil

The Green candle represents the money, and the white candle represents you. Make sure you anoint the candles with oil first, thinking of your desire for money to come to you. Set the candles on your alter or table 9 inches apart. After doing this say:

"Money, money come to me
In abundance three times three
May I be enriched in the best of ways
Harming none on its way
This I accept, so mote it be
Bring me money three times three!"

Repeat this for nine days. Each day move the white candle one inch closer to the green candle. When the candles touch, your spell is finished. Make sure you visualize the money pouring in from the universe.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Light a Candle, Cast a Spell

January 28, 2010 at 10:34 am (Associations, Brid, Bride, Brighid, Brigit, Candle, Charging, Crafts, Imbolc, Magic, pagan, Spell, Spells, Thursday, Witch)

Light a Candle, Cast a Spell
Article written by Melanie Fire Salamander;
Background for this story came
from Sylvana SilverWitch,
publisher of
Widdershins;
published in
Widdershins – Imbolc, 1999 – Volume 4, Issue 7;

In Northern European societies, Imbolc or Candlemas traditionally fell at a time when, with the end of winter in sight, families used the animal fat saved over the cold season to make candles. I don’t butcher stock, and I’m not planning to render meat fat to make candles, but I like connecting with the past through candle-making. And though the days are longer now than at solstice, they’re still short enough that a few candles help.

To further your magical purposes, you can make a spell candle for Imbolc – a candle into which you imbue a particular magical purpose. Once you’ve made and charged your spell candle, you burn it over time to further your intention. I find spell candles particularly good for goals that require a period of continued energy to manifest, for example a new job, and for things I desire recurrently, for example peace and harmony for myself and the people around me. Also, Imbolc is traditionally a time of initiations, of divination and of all things sacred to the goddess Bride, including smithcraft, poetry and healing. To align with the season, consider making spell candles dedicated to these ends.

You can make two kinds of candle, dipped and molded. For spell candles, I’d recommend molded candles, so you can include herbs and other ingredients that wouldn’t mix evenly with dipping wax.

Things you need:

  • Cylindrical glass container or containers
  • Paraffin-based candle wax
  • Double boiler or other large pot in which to melt the wax (keep in mind when choosing a pan for this purpose, once used for wax, it will no longer be suitable for cooking food…)
  • Wick
  • Scissors to cut the wick
  • Popsicle sticks (tongue depressors), one per candle
  • Metal tab to anchor the bottom of each wick (a heavy paper clip will do)
  • Old candles or candle coloring for color, if desired
  • Small objects appropriate to your spell
  • Herbs appropriate to your spell
  • Scent appropriate to your spell.

For your molding container, the best thing is the used glass from a seven-day candle. You can find seven-day candles all over, including many small ethnic markets or check your local pagan store. You can also use glass tumblers, jelly jars and the like. The larger the container, the bigger the possible candle and the longer it will burn. Seven-day candle containers have the advantage of having a good candle shape, so that the flame easily melts the wax at the sides of the glass. To accomplish your purpose, ideally you’ll burn the entire candle, leaving no stub, which is easiest to do in a container shaped like a seven-day candle’s. Make sure also that the glass of your container is fairly thick.

If you do use a seven-day candle, you’ll need to clean out any remaining wax. To do so, heat the glass in a pot of water to melt the wax. Be sure to heat the glass with the water, rather than introducing cold glass into boiling water, which might break the glass. You’ll need a bottle brush, detergent and some concentration, but it is possible to clean these containers.

Candle wax can be found at candle-supply stores and craft stores. It comes in blocks of two pounds each; the smallest amount you can buy is more than enough for several candles. For wick, again you’ll need a candle-supply or craft store. Lead-based wick, which has a thin thread of metal covered with cotton, is easiest to work with, but burning does release lead into the air where it is burned. You can also use pure cotton wick. The Popsicle stick, a craft store or drugstore item, is used to anchor the wick at the top of the candle. If you do use a seven-day candle container, and the tin tab at the bottom hasn’t disappeared, save it. Such a tab anchors the wick to the bottom of the glass, making sure the wick lasts the length of the candle. If you haven’t saved the tab, you can use a heavy paperclip or buy the real thing at a candle-supply or craft store.

The remaining ingredients depend on the intention of your spell and should have associations appropriate to that intention. None of these ingredients is required – you can make a spell candle by simply making and charging it, or by charging an ordinary candle. However, as with any charm, the more energy you put into in its creation and enchantment, the stronger the spell. I give some ideas for ingredients following; for a full list of associations, check your favorite table of magical correspondences, or see The Spiral Dance, by Starhawk; Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner, (this link is to the book, available on Google Books) by Scott Cunningham; or Aleister Crowley’s 777 (this, too, will take you to the book on Google Books).

The easiest way to color candles is to melt old candles with your wax. To get a strong color, use more colored wax. Don’t mix colors, or you’ll end up with a muddy brown. You can also purchase candle coloring at a candle-supply or craft store. For color symbolism, check tables of correspondences; as always, your personal associations and preferences are the strongest and most resonant. Some common associations follow:

  • Red: Lust, passion, health, animal vitality, courage, strength
  • Pink: Love, affection, friendship, kindness
  • Orange: Sexual energy, earth energy, adaptability, stimulation
  • Brown: Earth energy, animals
  • Yellow: Intellect, mental energy, concentration
  • Green: Finances, money, prosperity, fertility, growth
  • Blue: Calm, healing, patience, peace, clairvoyance
  • Purple: Spirituality, the fey, meditation, divination
  • Black: Waning moon, release, banishing, absorbing and destroying negativity, healing
  • White: Waxing or full moon, pro-tection, purification, peace, awareness; good for most workings

Probably the most common small object to add to a spell candle is a written expression of intention. Candle makers often add semi-precious stones; you can add a stone appropriate to your intention, for example sacred to a deity who rules that area of life, or personally connected to you, say a birthstone. Depending on your spell, other small objects might suit. If you’re doing a spell to invoke the peace of the ocean on a still day, you could include sand or seashells. A candle to draw love might include small cut-out hearts, one to draw money pieces of dollar bill. Note that any added objects should ideally be flammable, or if not flammable small enough not to prevent your candle from burning.

You can use herbs suitable for incense to further your spell. Use herbs you can safely burn indoors. Herbs may make a candle smoke and can combine with the wick to create a large flame, so use them sparingly. Also, herbs tend to clump at the top and bottom of the candle, often producing a stub at the end that’s hard to burn. However, herbs are easy burnable ingredients to add in line with your intention, and if you choose the right herbs they’ll smell good. For lists of herbs, try any incense-making book, such as Scott Cunningham’s The Complete Book of Incense, Oils and Brews (link to the book) or Wylundt’s Book of Incense (link to the book). To make sure your herbs smell sweet, burn a pinch first. Both the preceding books also discuss scents, which you can incorporate also. For a strongly scented candle, you’ll need to add perfume. It’s best to use candle scent, found at candle-supply and craft shops, or synthetic perfume oil. Essential oils are volatile and break down in the wax, leaving your candle with no scent at all.

The candle making process – As with any spell, start by considering what you want and what symbols represent your goal. Likewise, as always, don’t try to compel someone who hasn’t consented. Remember that what you do returns to you threefold. Start by collecting your ingredients and planning your candle-making for a day and hour appropriate to your intention. For spells of increase wait till the moon turns to waxing. Or phrase your spell to release something negative. If you need money, banish poverty. If you want love, banish loneliness. Give yourself a few hours to make your candle or candles, during a period when you’re unlikely to have your concentration broken. Just melting the wax alone, depending on the volume melted, can take from 15 minutes to an hour. You’ll be using the kitchen, so make sure you’ll have it to yourself or that any visitors will be attuned to your purpose.

First, melt the wax in the top of your double boiler. If you want all your candles to have the same color, add the crayons or old candles now. You can use a single pot if you’re willing to watch the wax closely – you don’t want it to burst into flames. Break the wax into small chunks beforehand, so it will melt faster. Heat the wax over medium heat, but don’t let it boil. If you want candles of different colors, you’ll need to melt the crayons or old candles separately, then add clear wax to about the right volume in the pot and mix before filling your containers. Add candle coloring according to package directions.

While the wax is melting, pad your working space well with newspaper, because you will almost certainly spill some wax. Make sure all your ingredients and tools are handy. If you have herbs in unmanageable sizes, for example whole rosemary stalks, break them down so the pieces are a size to burn without becoming small bonfires. Once the wax is fully melted, turn the heat low and let the wax cool till the wax on the sides of the pot starts to set, at approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit. Cooling the wax a little helps prevent the creation of large air bubbles in your finished candle.

Now you’re ready to start forming candles. I usually cast a working circle at this point, calling my patron deities to witness, but without a lot of tools or formal setup. You can work as elaborately or simply as you like. However, I would recommend making the candle with focused intention, as well as charging it later. Take a moment, then, to focus your concept of your goal. You might create a running mantra to repeat through the rest of your candle-making, or consider an image or group of images to help you concentrate. Be sure to state your intention simply and firmly. If it seems appropriate, write your intention down.

First, if you want multiple candles with the same scent, or you’re only making one candle, scent the wax now. Next, cut a wick for each candle. The wick needs to be as long as your candle container, plus several inches. Thread the end of the wick through the metal tab or paperclip, or other object appropriate to your spell – for a money spell, you might anchor the wick with a folded bill. Then, drop the weighted wick-end to the bottom of the glass container. Making sure the weighted end sits flush on the bottom and the wick stays as straight as possible, wrap the other wick end around a Popsicle stick and set the Popsicle stick across the mouth of the glass. Make sure the wick-tail is in the center of the candle-to-be. The more centered your wick, the more evenly your candle will burn. If you’re using unleaded wicking, pour a little wax around the tab at the end, then let it harden firmly. Then gently stretch the wick taut, and rewrap the top around the Popsicle stick.

Next, add the nonwax ingredients to your candle. Drop your folded written intention, if any, and any other objects into the bottom of the candle glass. As each falls, imagine it adding strength to your spell. You can add herbs now as well, or you can add them to the top after pouring, if you want them to float down through the wax and be distributed through the candle. When your objects and initial herbs are in, pour the wax. Pour evenly and slowly, and try to make sure your wick stays in the candle’s center. If you want to add herbs after pouring, do so directly afterward. If you want to scent a candle singly, now’s the time.

The next part is the really hard part – set the candle out of the way, and leave it alone! It will take up to an hour to harden. You can continue to meditate on your purpose, set up an altar to formally charge your candle, or take down your circle for the time being. You might want to check your candle in this interim period, as the top’s center may form a depression, which you can top off with melted wax. To this end, keep some wax melted. When your candle’s solid, cut off the extra wick at the top, leaving about a half-inch.

Next, energize the finished candle with your intention. Cast your circle and call any deities or spirit helpers you like, if you haven’t yet, and restate your purpose. Then raise energy in your chosen manner. When the energy’s at its height, send it into your candle, then ground any excess into the earth, keeping what you need for yourself.

Finally, burn your candle. One of the great things about burning a candle in a glass container is that you can keep it going night and day in relative safety. Make sure, however, that the candle is in a place where no human or pet can knock it over, and where no combustible thing can fall across it. Also, at the end of the candle’s life, you might want to burn it while you can watch; it’s during the last inch or so that the glass will break, if it’s going to. Either way, just in case, burn the candle on a nonflammable surface, say an earthenware plate or a tile floor.

If you don’t want to burn your candle every day, burn it on days appropriate to your spell. For example, burn a love candle on Fridays, a day sacred to Aphrodite, Freya and other love goddesses. Again, tables of correspondences can help you figure appropriate days, or you can determine them astrologically. Or you can burn your candle when you feel particular need.

Ingredients for different intentions – If you can’t find or don’t like any of the following ingredients, by all means cut them, substitute or better yet create your own recipe from scratch! The stronger the associations for you and the more personal your candle’s creation, the more effective your candle will be.

  • For divination and psychic work: Purple coloring; a small image of an eye, for far-seeing; lemongrass, sandalwood, cloves, yarrow and a pinch of nutmeg; frankincense scent
  • For protection: No coloring; basil, Vervain, rosemary, St. John’s Wort and a pinch of black pepper; Vetiver or patchouli scent
  • For healing: Pale blue coloring, bay, sandalwood, cedar, carnation, lemon balm; eucalyptus scent
  • For peace and harmony: Pale blue or lavender coloring; lavender, meadowsweet and hops; lilac or any light floral scent
  • For inspiration in the arts: Yellow coloring; a small image of a light bulb; a piece of amber; bay, cinnamon, lavender, orange peel; scent of bergamot, or any citrus scent
  • To attract love: Pink coloring; small silk or candy hearts; rose petals; jasmine scent
  • To attract sex: Red coloring; sexual images; rose petals, ginger, damiana, ginseng, a vanilla bean; musk scent
  • To attract money: Green coloring; a folded bill or shiny dime; dill, lavender, sage, cedar, wood aloe; oak moss, Vetiver or patchouli scent, or some combination of these
  • To get a job: Green coloring; a topaz or turquoise; pictures of tools you use in your work; bay, lavender, cedar, red clover, nutmeg; orange scent, or any citrus scent

As you make and burn your candle, attune to the season as well as your intention. Now is the time to ask Bride for inspiration and to light a new flame, beckoning the longer days to come.

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A – Candle Crafts

January 25, 2010 at 10:09 am (Brid, Bride, Brighid, Brigit, Candle, Children, Crafts, Imbolc, Magic, Monday, pagan, Witch)

Candle Hat
From "Circle Round" By Starhawk, Diane Baker and Anne Hill

Here are some various Imbolc candle crafts for children to do (with an adult’s help if necessary)

One holiday tradition in Scandinavian countries is for the girls to wear garlands in their hair that hold a circle of lit candles and bless the light’s return. We’ve adapted this candle custom to honor the returning light for Brigit. These paper hats are a simple and safe variation. Draw an inner circle on a 9-inch paper plate, about an inch from the rim. Next draw very light lines dividing the circle into quarters. Draw four rectangular candle shapes, keeping the dividing lines as guides for the candles’ centers. The rectangles will meet in the center of the plate in a small square. Cut out the candle shapes, preserving their connection to the ring at the rim. This connection serves as the base of the candle. Bend candles from their base to stand upright. Decorate candles with markers, crayons and glitter. Use the discarded plate material to cut flame shapes. Color them bright flame colors, then glue or staple them to the top of the candles.

Pentacle Candle Wheel
from ‘Cauldrons And Broomsticks’

Materials:

  •  Molding Clay
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • 13- 4" White Stick Candles (1/4" diameter)
  • Paints (optional)
  • This Pentacle Candle Wheel is the perfect accessory to any Imbolc altar. Use enough clay to roll out flat with a rolling pin and cut out a circle 18" in diameter and 1/2" thick. Roll excess clay into rope, 1/4" in diameter and long enough to boarder the wheel base. Wet the clay rope enough to stick to base. This will contain any wax that drips from the burning candles. Score the image of the pentacle into the wheel base with the pencil, using the ruler to make straight lines. The Pentacle’s points should be approx. 1/2" away from the border. Take one of the white candles and press bottom slightly (approx. 1/4" ) into each Pentacle point, each cross point (inner angles of the Pentacle) and three depressions in a pyramid shape in the top Pentacle triangle ray. Now allow the clay to dry and harden. The Pentacle Candle Wheel can be painted if desired after dried. Place candles in each of the depressions and place in the center of the Imbolc altar. Remember that the Candle Wheel is the symbol of the light that ensues from the union of the Bride and her consort, the Lord of the Forest.

For additional candle craft ideas, you can go here, here, here, or you can just type "candles" in the little search box on the left.

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Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A – Brigit Candles

January 11, 2010 at 10:22 am (Brigit, Candle, Crafts, Imbolc, Kids, Magic, Monday, pagan, Witch, Witchlets)

Brigit Candles

You will need:

  • 1 recipe salt dough clay
  • a bowl of water
  • 8 1/2 by 11 inch sheet of paper, one for each candle
  • wax paper, cut into 8 1/2 by 11 inch sheets, one for each candle tape
  • 1 T vegetable oil
  • toothpicks
  • small bowl
  • candle making supplies

Honor Brigit with new special candles. These candles use molds made from coiled salt dough ropes so that each completely unique candle bears the spiral imprint of the coil.

Taper Candles – Make ropes by rolling salt dough clay between your hands. Each rope should be two or three feet long and 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter. If younger children can’t manage such lengths, have them make smaller segments that can be joined later with a little pressure and water. Dip your fingers into the bowl of water occasionally if the dough tends to crack. Roll the paper into a 1 inch wide cylinder and tape it shut. Around this cylinder, tape a piece of wax paper. Coat the wax paper with a thin layer of oil. Lightly moisten a salt dough rope with water. Lay the paper cylinder on its side at one end of the rope. Roll it along the dough, wrapping the rope up the cylinder until it is six inches tall. Be sure the edges of the coiled rope always touch. To provide extra support, at intervals stick several toothpicks vertically through the coils. Make a bottom for the mold by shaping another piece of salt dough into a 3/4 inch thick circle that’s larger than the coiled tower in diameter. Moisten the bottom’s surface, then carefully lift the coiled tower onto the bottom piece and press gently to make a seal. Pull the paper cylinder out. This slides out easily, leaving the wax paper. Remove it by gently tugging on the wax paper with one hand while you support the clay coils with the others. Inspect each part of the mold, looking for tiny cracks where melted wax could leak. Press these shut. If the coils start to sag, quickly fashion a paper cylinder around the outside of the coils and tape it closed. Trim it to the same height as the clay, so it won’t get in the way when you are pouring wax. Set the mold in an empty bowl, in case wax leaks through. You are ready to pour.

Pouring the wax is thrilling. Go very slowly up each level to make sure no wax is leaking through. If a leak appears, carefully pinch it shut and pour again. Insert the wick. The wax will harden within an hour, long before the clay dries. To unmold, just unwind the clay. If some sticks, soak the candle in cool water and then gently rinse off the clay. The candles have a wonderfully craggy spiral looping from bottom to top, and burn with a lovely strong flame.

Beehive Candles – You can also make beehive candles with great success by coiling ropes of salt dough in a small, deep bowl. A rice bowl is the perfect size. It’s easier to start with making a spiral, about 3 inches across, outside of the bowl, then transferring this into the bottom of the bowl. Next coil the rope inside the bowl until you reach the top. The candle is burned with the dome side up, so the wick has to be extended through the wax at the bottom of the bowl. When the wax is firm enough to insert the wick, use a slightly larger straw than usual, and push it firmly through the candle, into the dough beneath, straight to the bottom of the bowl. The candle unmolds easily: Lift candle and mold from the bowl and uncoil the mold.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Candle Divination

December 3, 2009 at 11:28 am (Candle, Christmas, Divination, Magic, pagan, Spells, Thursday, Winter, Witch, Yule)

Candle Divination

from The Wiccan Garden

To perform any of the following, choose a room not usually subject to winds or drafts. Night is the preferred time, and it’s best to lower the lights. Use white candles except where otherwise indicated.

Light a candle and place it in its holder. Sit or stand before it and search for signs from the flame itself and its wick. If the flame seems dim, it may be best to hold off on plans for the time being. An extremely bright flame is a sign of good fortune, but if it quickly grows smaller, the luck will be temporary. If the flame waves about, bad weather may be coming, or a great change in circumstances is foretold. A spark visible in the wick indicates the imminent arrival of good news. If the flame turns in a circle or seems to form a spiral, danger is forecast. Finally, a halo around the flame indicates an approaching storm.

Another method of reading candles involves watching the manner in which the molten wax drips down the candle sides. Place the candle in a holder. Ask a yes or no question while lighting the wick. Watch it for some time. If the wax drips only on the left side, the answer is no. If on the right, yes. If equally on both sides, no response is possible. If no wax drips down, ask again later.

A rather unusual form of candle divination involves the remarkable properties of fresh lemon juice. Obtain a clean, non-ball point or felt-tip pen. (The type used for calligraphy). Since neither an ink-filled pen nor a pencil can be used, a sharpened, short stick may be substituted. Squeeze the juice from a lemon into a small bowl. Lay three, five or seven pieces of paper on a flat surface. Dipping the pen into the lemon juice, (write) a possible future on each piece of paper with the juice; the juice here acts as the ink. Since lemon juice is invisible and difficult to write with, reduce these futures to just a few words. Allow them to dry. Light a candle. Place the slips of paper into a bowl. Mix them with your left hand, then choose one at random. Hold the chosen piece of paper close enough to the flame to heat it but not enough to burn it. The heat will reveal the future written on the paper as the lemon juice darkens. This will determine the possible future.

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A(n)- Evergreen Yule Candle

November 23, 2009 at 11:39 am (Candle, Children, Christmas, Crafts, Fun, Kids, Magic, Monday, pagan, Witch)

Evergreen Yule Candles
from Kaboose

What You Need:

  • Paraffin
  • Empty, clean, dry can
  • Pan
  • Water
  • Use of a stove
  • Paint brush
  • Candle (a large candle is easier to use)
  • Small Sprig of evergreen
  • Holiday ribbon

Melt some paraffin inside a can placed in a pan of hot water (on the stove). Flatten the small evergreen sprig and put some hot paraffin on the candle where you want the sprig to go. Place the sprig decoratively on the hot paraffin – it should stick to the candle. Then paint more melted paraffin over the sprig of evergreen. Let set. You may need multiple coats. Tie festive ribbon around base of candle. This will make a nice centerpiece or to give as a gift.
Adult supervision is recommended.
This project is rated EASY to do

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Samhain Psychic Spell

October 8, 2009 at 10:39 am (Candle, Divination, Halloween, Magic, pagan, Psychic, Samhain, Spells, Thursday, Witch)

Samhain Psychic Spell
From Scott Cunningham’s "Spell Crafts"

You will need:

  • Small box or your Spell Box
  • 1 large bowl
  • 1/4 cup lemon grass
  • 1 tsp. ground nutmeg
  • 1 tsp. orange peel, dried
  • 3 small polished amethysts
  • 1 small polished aquamarine
  • 1 small polished citrine
  • 1 small quartz crystal
  • 1 small bottle containing pure spring water, tightly lidded or capped
  • 1 blue candle
  • 1 candle holder

Begin by placing the lemon grass into the bowl. Touch it with your fingers. Relax. Breathe deeply and run your fingers through the herbs, visualizing yourself as a psychic person. Relax and send soothing psychic energy into the herb. Add the cloves and mix with the lemon grass, continuing to visualize. Add separately the nutmeg and orange peel, mixing them with the previously added herbs. Pour the mixed herbs into the box or your spell box while saying:

"Herb and seed and flower,
Give me psychic power"

Next, hold the three amethysts between the palms of your hands until they  become warm, charging them with your visualization. Gently place them in the box. Repeat with the aquamarine, the citrine and the quartz crystal, adding each to the box. After putting the quartz crystal into your spell box, say these or like words:

"Moon light, Moon bright,
Waterfalls of trembling white:
Mirrors of the unseen world
Are unveiled in my sight"

Finally, hold the small bottle of water between your palms and feel its cool, soothing psychic energy. Place into the spell box with these or similar words:

"Dew and rain, fog and sea,
Awaken psychic energy:
This is my will, so mote it be"

Charge the blue candle. Place into its holder and burn for nine minutes before the spell box (do not yet close its lid). Close the lid of the spell box, then snuff out the candle’s flame. Burn the candle before the spell box every day for nine minutes until the candle is gone (closing the spell box between sessions). Whenever you have need of the box, even before the candle is gone, light the blue candle (or any other blue candle, if the original candle has burned itself out), open the box, and slowly say these of similar words:

"Conscious mind….
Is now blind…
Psychic mind…
Is now mine…"

Use as needed, especially in conjunction with use of tarot cards, crystals, rune stones, or other psychic tools.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Spell To Break The Powers of A Spell

September 24, 2009 at 10:05 am (Candle, Halloween, Magic, pagan, Samhain, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Spell To Break The Powers of A Spell
by Anneka

Are things happening to you that you can’t explain? Well maybe someone’s put a hex on you. Here’s a spell to undo what’s been done!

You Need:

  • black candle
  • water
  • a black bowl

Place the candle into the black bowl, fix the candle to the bowl. Using the wax drippings from the candle so it stands alone. Fill the bowl to the rim with fresh water, without wetting the wick. Breathe deeply and meditate for a couple of minutes. When your mind is clear, light the candle. Visualize the power of the spell cast against you as living within the fame of the candle. As the candle burns down, it will sputter and go out as it touches the water. As it is extinguished by the water the spell is broken. Finally, dig a hole in the ground, pour the water into it, and then bury the candle.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A – Apple Candle Holders

July 27, 2009 at 10:24 am (Apple, Candle, Crafts, Decoration, Home, Lammas, Lughnasadh, Magic, Monday, pagan, Witch)

Apple Candleholders

Needed:

  • Red apples, early acorn squash or even eggplants
  • Soft cloth
  • Knife or corer
  • Lemon juice
  • Sprig of rosemary, basil or other fresh herb
  • Taper candle

***Apples seem to last the longest.

Rinse and dry the fruit or vegetable thoroughly. Polish the outside with soft cloth until the shiny. Stand your choice up on its bottom, and use a knife or a corer to make a hole in the top where the stem is located. Go about halfway down so that the candle will have a sturdy base. Widen the hole until it’s the same diameter as your candle. Pour some lemon juice into the hole and allow it to sit for ten minutes. This will prevent the apple from browning and softening too quickly. Pour out the lemon juice, dry out the hole, and insert a sprig of rosemary, basil, or other fresh herb of your choice. Finally, add the taper candle. Use a little bit of dripped wax to secure the taper in place.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A – Sand Candles

July 13, 2009 at 11:08 am (Candle, Cauldron, Crafts, Fun, Lammas, Lughnasadh, Magic, Monday, pagan, Witch)

Make a Sand Candle
From
Earth Witchery

Needed:

  • bucket
  • sand
  • small cauldron, round cereal bowl, or whatever you want the shape to be
  • sm dowel rod (if you use the bowl) to make legs
  • candle wax, OR 1 ounce paraffin wax mixed with 1 ounce stearin
  • wax crayons, in the color you want the candle to be
  • Piece of string or wick
  • Double boiler, for melting the wax

Fill the bucket with clean, damp (not wet) sand. Hollow out any shape you like with your hands, but many witches like the cauldron shape, making the name "cauldron candle" a popular name for this sand candle. Whatever you hollow out will be the shape of the completed candle. You can push a round cereal bowl into the sand, adding three legs to make a cauldron shape. Or you can push your own cauldron into the sand. If you use the cereal bowl, use the dowel rod to make sure the leg holes are carefully defined and as even as possible.

Melt the wax carefully. Be certain that your pan is perfectly dry (water will cause the wax to explode as it heats). Cut a piece of string or wick and prepare it by placing it in the melted wax with a spoon or tweezers. Straighten it by pulling it out tight and setting it aside to harden.

Carefully pour the wax into the sand mold. The sand should be damp, but not too wet or it won’t stick to the wax. As the wax begins to cool, the sand will drop, forming a hollow in the wax. Keep refilling the hollow with hot wax. If you want a thick crust, you need to use hotter wax. The hotter the wax the thicker the crust. But be careful: hot wax can cause severe burns.

Let the candle sit for two or three hours in a cool place. Use a candle needle or a piece of thick wire to make a hole for the wick. Cut the wire as long as the candle is deep. Leave it in the mold overnight until the wax hardens.

Dig the candle out of the sand the next day. Carefully brush any loose sand from the candle. Remove the wire and insert the prepared wick. You may have to melt a little more wax and pour it around the wick to help the wick stand in place. If your cauldron legs are uneven, set the candle briefly in a hot skillet to even them out.

You can decorate the outside sand crust by gluing on sea shells, or you can carve a design in the sand with a sharp instrument. A pentacle maybe?

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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