Thursday This Is Your Spell – Midsummer Marigold Endurance Spell

June 17, 2010 at 9:43 am (Flowers, Garden, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Midsummer Marigold Endurance Spell
Unknown author

Write your birth-sign on a small stone in permanent pen. In a large flower pot, place the stone at the bottom. Plant a marigold on top, placing seven stones around the plant. As you work, chant:

"Sing me the song of seasons
Show me the sun’s delight
Open my heart for you radiance
Lead me towards the light."

The marigold is the flower of endurance that always turns its face toward the sun, following its path through the sky. This ritual will give you endurance.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This is Your Spell – Rose Spell For The Fey

May 20, 2010 at 9:20 am (Fae, Faery, Fairies, Fairy, Flowers, Litha, Love, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Plants, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Rose Spell For The Fey
Said to be from a 17th century work

Midsummer is a time when the Fey are out and about, so it seems like it would be a good time to try to attract some to your garden – if you want to. Roses attract the Faery to a garden. Their sweet scent will lure elemental spirits to take up residence close by. Roses can be used in Faery love spells. When performing the spell, sprinkle rose petals under your feet and dance softly upon them while asking the Faery for their blessing on your magic. Roses are loved by the fey so you can plant Roses in your garden to attract fairies. Wild Roses are best for this purpose and you need to say the following spell as you plant your baby Rose bush:

"I ask a fairy from the wild,
To come and tend this wee rose-child.
A babe of air she thrives today,
Root her soul in the Goddesses’ good clay.
Fairies make this twig your bower,
By your magic shall time see her flower!"

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Wednesday Whatever – Summer Solstice: Ura, the Night of the Heather

May 19, 2010 at 9:02 am (Ancestors, Associations, Fae, Faery, Fairies, Fairy, Flowers, Folklore, Heather, Herbs, History, Lore, Magic, pagan, Wednesday, Wisdom, Witch)

Summer Solstice: Ura, the Night of the Heather
by Sarah the SwampWitch,
Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002

The moon is perhaps humankind’s oldest form of marking time. According to some scholars, the Celts used a Lunar Calendar that consisted of 13 months, each 28 days in length. Each month of the Celtic Lunar calendar bears the name of a tree, which also stands for one of the consonants in the Celtic ‘tree alphabet’. There are basically two different versions of this Lunar calendar: the Beth-Luis-Nion (which begins on the Winter Solstice) and the Beth-Luis-Fearn (which begins on Samhain). I work with the Beth-Luis-Nion simply because it seems to work the best for my style of Witchcraft.

Beth-Luis-Nion version of The Celtic Tree calendar

  • B – Beth, the Birch Month (December 24th – January 20th)
  • L – Luis, the Rowan Month (January 21st – February 17th)
  • N – Nion, the Ash month (February 18th – March 17th)
  • F – Fearn, the Alder Month (March 18th – April 14th)
  • S – Saille, the Willow Month (April 15th – May 12th)
  • H – Huath, the Hawthorn Month (May 13th – June 9th)
  • D – Duir, the Oak Month (Jun 10th – July 7th)
  • T – Tinne, the Holly Month (July 8th – August 4th)
  • C – Coll, the Hazel Month (August 5th – September 1st)
  • M – Muin, the Vine Month (September 2nd – September 29th)
  • G – Gort, the Ivy Month (September 30th – October 27th
  • Ng – Ngetal, the Reed Month (October 28th – November 24th)
  • R – Ruis, the Elder Month (November 25th – December 23rd)

The five vowels I, A, O, U, and E have corresponding tree names to the nights of the solstices and equinoxes:

  • I – Idho, the Night of the Yew, Winter Solstice Eve
  • A – Ailm, the Night of the Silver Fir, Winter Solstice
  • – Herb too sacred to have a Celtic name, the Night of Mistletoe, Day after Winter Solstice
  • O – Onn, the Night of the Gorse Bush, Spring Equinox
  • U – Ura, the Night of the Heather, Summer Solstice
  • E – Eadha, the Night of the White Poplar, Alban Elfed or Autumnal Equinox

Here Is Lore On The Tree Of The Summer Solstice – Heather:

  • Latin name: Calluna vulgaris
  • Celtic name: Ura (pronounced: Oor’ uh)
  • Folk or Common Names: Common Heather, Ling, Scottish Heather
  • Parts used: herb, flowering shoots.
  • Herbal usage: Heather’s flowering shoots are used to treat insomnia, stomach aches, coughs and skin problems. The plant, used fresh or dried, strengthens the heart and raises blood pressure. It is slightly diuretic and a Heather Tea is often prescribed in cases of urinary infections. Heather is sometimes used in conjunction with corn silk and cowberries.
  • Magickal History & Associations: Heather is associated with the sun, and with the planet of Venus. Its color is resin colored and its element is water. Heather’s bird is the lark, and its animal association is the honey bee. In ancient times the Danes brewed a powerful beer made from honey and Heather. And for centuries the heather flowers have also been a special beverage to the bee, who in return creates delightful Heather honey! Its stones are amethyst, peridot, and amertine – and it is a feminine herb.

The herb is sacred to many Goddesses: Isis, Venus-Erycina, Uroica, Garbh Ogh, Cybele, Osiris, Venus, Guinevere, and Butes among them. White Heather was considered unlucky by Scottish loyalists because of its connection with the banishment of Bonny Prince Charles. Haether is the home to a type of Fey called Heather Pixies. Like other Pixies, the Heather Pixies have clear or golden auras and delicate, translucent wings. But these faeries are attracted specifically to the moors and to the Heather which covers them. They are not averse to human contact, but they don’t seek them out. They have a pranksterish nature.

Magickal Usage: Heather is sacred to the Summer Solstice. Heather is used for magick involving maturity, consummation, general luck, love, ritual power, conjuring ghosts, healing, protection, rain-making and water magick.

Charms made with Heather can be worn or carried as protection against danger, rape and other violent crimes. This flower represents good fortune and Heather can also be carried as a lucky charm. It was believed that wearing the blossom associated with your month of birth would bring exceptionally good luck – therefore people born in the month of Heather (August) should carry White Heather, for even better luck throughout the year.

Legend has it that a gift of white Heather brings luck to both the giver and the receiver, whereas red Heather is said to have been colored by heathens killed in battle by Christians, so is less lucky. Heather is associated with secrets from the Otherworld.

A sprig of white Heather placed in a special place of silence and meditation has the power to conjure ghosts, ‘haints’ or spirits. After picking a piece of white Heather at midnight, place it in a glass of river water in the darkest corner of your home. Sit and think of a departed loved one and it is said that the loved one’s shadow will visit you. Heather is said to ignite faery passions and open portals between their world and our own. Heather represents solitude because it thrives in wide open spaces, and Faeries who enjoy living in such undisturbed places are said to feast on the tender stalks of Heather.

The Fey of this flower are drawn to humans who are shy. Heather is useful for Solitary healing work (going within). Heather, if used along with Mistletoe, creates powerful healing medicine in both spiritual and physical aspects.

Heather can be used at Midsummer to promote love – carry red Heather for passion or white Heather for cooling the passion of unwanted suitors. If you give someone a gift of Heather it means: ‘Admiration’. A charm bag filled with Heather can be carried for decreasing egotism or self-involvement. As a water herb, Heather is very useful in weather magick. When burned outdoors with Fern, the herbal smoke of Heather attracts rain. Bouquets of Heather and Fern can also be dipped in water to call rain.

***Document Copyright © 99, 00, 01,02 by Sarah Nunn (Sarah the SwampWitch). This document can be re-published and shared only as long as no information is lost or changed, credit is given to the author, and it is provided or used without cost to others. Other uses of this document must be approved in writing by Sarah Nunn.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A – Pressed Flowers Crafts

April 26, 2010 at 9:28 am (Beltane, Children, Crafts, Decoration, Flowers, Kids, Magic, Monday, pagan, Witch)

Pressed Flowers Crafts
From
Hearth & Home Witchery

With dried pressed flowers you can make placemats, note cards, bookmarks and more! To press flowers, be sure they are rid of any excess water. Lay between the pages of old phone books and cover with heavier books (or if you have big heavy books use two sheets of paper on each side of the flowers to prevent any damage to the book’s pages.) Make sure the book is covered with a few more books for added weight. Let sit untouched for two weeks, if flowers are not completely dry then let sit another week.

Needed:

  • various spring blooms and greenery, dry and pressed*
  • heavy card stock,poster board
  • contact paper
  • glue
  • scissors
  • markers
  • glitter, paint, other doodads for decorating

For the placemat: Cut posterboard to average placemat size (about 12"X 16"), glue flowers to poster board if you want (helps to keep them in place for later), let dry. Decorate as desired. Cut 2 equal lengths of contact paper that are slightly larger than the posterboard (so it overlaps about an inch on each side). Carefully unpeel a section of contact paper and with the help of a friend or parent, carefully center over the top and press onto decorated posterboard. Press out all air bubbles. then apply the second sheet to the back. Press out all air bubbles and seal the edges. Trim if needed.

For bookmark, follow the directions for placemat only cut your card stock or poster board bookmark sized (about 2"x 5").

For Notecards

Needed:

  • Tweezers
  • Flowers and Leaves (You can also use herbs)
  • White absorbent paper
  • Note Cards
  • Construction paper (Optional)
  • White Glue
  • Toothpick

Choose flowers that are a good size for your work. The best ones are simple flowers with few petals such as pansies, buttercups, Queen Anne’s lace. (This is especially true for beginners, until you get more confidence to try more elaborate blossoms and greenery.) Pick your flowers after the dew has dried, usually late morning. After you have selected your flowers and greenery and picked them, its time to press them. Remove all the stems from the flowers. Spread the blossoms and leaves in a single layer on a sheet of white absorbent paper. Place a second sheet of paper on top and place heavy objects such as books on top. Leave for about 2 weeks.

Now that your blooms and greenery are dried its time to get creative! Its a good idea to arrange your flowers and greens on paper before you glue. Be gentle though as some flowers or leaves can be brittle. Next, take a pair of tweezers and pick up a leaf that you want for the background. Using a toothpick dipped in white glue apply a small amount to the back of the leaf. Place on white note paper. Continue this process until you have placed all the leaves you want onto your card. Next, glue on all the major focal flowers. Glued the same way as the greenery. Once this is done, add all of the accent flowers.

Now that your pressed flower arrangement is completed you can write you quotes, poetry etc under the flowers, or you just leave blank for a simple but beautiful look. To protect your cards cover them with clear self-adhesive contact paper. Press contact paper down firmly to make sure it sticks to the flowers, greenery and card. For extra color glue finished card onto construction paper.

Editor’s Note:

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A – Creating a Bee House

April 12, 2010 at 9:47 am (Beltane, Children, Crafts, Flowers, Garden, Kids, Monday, pagan, Witch, Witchlets)

Creating a Bee House
Found at Proud to be Pagan

Besides bees that nest in hives of thousands, some bees prefer to live alone. Bumble bees and carpenter bees are just two examples of bees which love to nest in holes. You can help these wonderful pollinating creatures by building an easy bee house.
You will need:

  • block of wood 6x6x6 inches
  • a drill with a 3/16 inch bit
  • an eye screw
  • some string

You will need an adult to help you with the drilling. Drill about 12 holes in random places on one side of the block 5 inches deep. These will be the individual bee houses. Be sure that the holes are drilled at just a slight upward angle to prevent the rain from coming in. Screw the eye screw into the very center of the top of the bee house and tie a piece of short heavy string to it. Hang your bee house in a tree where you think the bees would be safe from the elements. As the wood ages it will turn a nice gray color and blend in with the surroundings. Your bees will return again and again to visit your house and stay around to pollinate your gardens.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Dandelion Muffins

March 30, 2010 at 9:11 am (Beltane, Cooking, Dandelion, Flowers, Magic, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Witch)

Dandelion Muffins
Recipe taken from Native Harvests (author unknown)
and The Dandelion Celebration by Peter Gail

Ingredients:

  • 2 c flour
  • 2 t baking powder
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 c dandelion flower petals
  • 1/4 c vegetable oil
  • 1/4 c honey
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 1 1/2 c milk

Combine flour, baking powder, salt & flower petals. In separate bowl, combine oil, honey, egg & milk. Mix liquids with dry ingredients, stir just to moisten. Spoon into oiled muffin tins and bake in a 400 degree oven for 20-25 minutes.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Wednesday Whatever – ***ADULT CONTENT****Beltane to Midsummer – The Season of Love

March 24, 2010 at 9:43 am (Bedroom, Beltane, Earth, Fertility, Flowers, Life, Love, Magic, pagan, Spring, Witch)

Beltane to Midsummer – The Season of Love
by Judy Harrow Found at Proteus Coven

Beltane is one of our most sacred festivals. Beltane is lusty, bawdy, even vulgar. Joyous, raunchy Beltane, while the life energy is still rising, and nearing its peak, is the happiest day of our ritual year. Beltane is for lovers. Go on, get sweaty with your sweetie. It’s not just permissible, it’s an act of worship to the most high Gods.

Is this about sex? You betcha! Is this about procreative sex, the sacred union of male and female to bring forth new life? Sure is! Is this only about procreative sex? Hell, no! All acts of love and pleasure are Her rituals. Procreative heterosex is just one kind of sex. Sex itself is just one happy possibility. Another equally-blessed way to celebrate Spring is to take your favorite niece to ride a carousel.

During happy, flowery May and June, play with your best friends. Too often, in our lives, we give our closest attention to the problem areas. As much as you can, give that a rest. There are other seasons for the heavy confrontations, the working through of old issues, the processing of the process. For now, just take some time to enjoy – and reinforce – all those loves and friendships that are working (and possibly dust off a few that have been neglected while you greased various squeaky wheels.)

The spring winds may also move you to offer random acts of kindness and senseless beauty to total strangers. That’s fine, follow your bliss. Here are some ways to enjoy love and pleasure during the extravagant late Spring:

  • Let love and pleasure overflow from deep within yourself. Spend an evening in long, slow masturbation. Clean and adorn your bedroom as though you were expecting your favorite lover. You may even want to buy new bed-linens. Take a long, slow, scented bath. Anoint yourself with your favorite essential oil or perfume. (Caution: always test first for allergies. Many essential oils are corrosive or toxic if applied without dilution in a carrier oil. Try 1:3 in olive oil or canola.) Do exactly what you like, and also experiment to discover more things you like. Do not rush. Try to do this once a week during the season of love.
  • Have you noticed that Mother’s Day and Father’s Day both fall within this season? By all means, celebrate your birth parents and grandparents and enjoy what your children do for you. Many of us also have elders and mentors who are not blood kin, in and out of the Craft. Acknowledge them as well.
  • Send a surprise gift to someone you love or respect. They will find it so much more remarkable now, far away from Yule’s frenzy.
  • Try a trust walk. In this, one person is blindfolded, and then guided by one or more other people. They keep the blindfolded person safe, but that’s just the start of what they do. They also guide the person to delightful experiences that do not require sight. This works well as a coven activity, but it’s equally intense if done among lovers in their own special place.
  • Have sex with your lover(s). Lots of it. Try a new position. Do it on a different piece of furniture. Go to a sex toy store together and giggle a lot. Or go separately and surprise each other with what you bring home. Have sex again. Slower. More. Lovingly bathe and massage each other. Make foreplay an art form. Make love.
  • Please make your sex both joyful and safe for all parties. Consensus, consideration and respect should never be passed over in the throes of passion.
  • Take a child to the zoo, or the circus, or just go fly a kite! It’s important for parents, who work so hard to support and teach their children, to also enjoy those kids. Go out and play! This may be even more important for those of us who are not parents. We don’t see our nephews, nieces, godkids every day. We need some exposure to the wonder and innocence of childhood.
  • Sometime, when you’re home before your spouse or lover, greet them with flowers, candles, wine and yourself in a very sexy outfit.
  • Is there a friend you’ve been missing? Perhaps you moved, changed jobs, changed covens? Now you have to make a conscious effort to see each other and, well, you know how busy and stressed most of us are. Pick up the phone. Schedule a get-together if you can. At least, send a note or a card. Let him or her know how you feel.
  • In a trusting group, try a "tribal love feast." These are the rules: everyone bring finger food to share (be liberal, chocolate pudding is finger food). Set out the food picnic-style on a cloth on the floor. Recline on cushions. Nobody may put food into their own mouth. Nobody may put food into the same mouth twice. No talking. (The group decides in advance whether this may or may not develop into group sex. It doesn’t have to.)
  • Work through the Masters and Johnson sensate focus exercises with your lover(s). If you don’t know what these are, find out.
  • Go to a really good, substantial movie or play with a friend, or a small group. Or agree to read the same substantial book. Afterwards, talk about it. Rediscover your pleasure in the exchange of ideas, the working of another mind.
  • Spend some time with close friends and lovers without speaking. Perhaps go for a walk in a beautiful place, stopping frequently to point out lovely sights, textures or sounds. Or listen (and stretch, move and dance) to music without lyrics. Or cook a meal together in silence, feeling into the tastes, smells and textures of the food (choose the menu and shop in advance). Experiment with doing this with one other person at a time, or with your coven or other small and trusted group.

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Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Wednesday Whatever – You Call It Easter, We Call It Ostara

March 10, 2010 at 10:53 am (Ancestors, Associations, Children, Eggs, Eostre, Fae, Fertility, Flowers, Folklore, History, Kids, Lore, Magic, Ostara, pagan, Wednesday, Witch, Witchlets)

You Call It Easter, We Call It Ostara
by Peg Aloi Originally published on Witchvox

Try this sometime with your children or a young niece, nephew or cousin: on the day of the Vernal or Autumnal Equinox, just a few moments before the exact moment of the equinox, go outside with a raw egg. Find a reasonably level place on the sidewalk or driveway. For a few moments just before and just after the equinox, you can balance the egg upright (wider end down) by simply setting it down on the ground. No kidding! It will stand up all by itself. Kids love this, and most adults are amazed and delighted, too. This little "trick" brings together two of the most potent aspects of this holiday: the balancing of the earth’s gravity midway between the extremes of light and dark at Winter and Summer Solstice; and the symbolism of the egg.

The egg is one of the most notable symbols of Easter, but, as someone who was raised Catholic and who was never told exactly why we colored eggs at Easter, or why there was a bunny who delivered candy to us, or why it was traditional to buy new clothes to wear for church on Easter Sunday, I always wondered about this holiday. As with many of the seemingly unrelated secular symbols and traditions of Christmas (what do evergreen trees, mistletoe, reindeer and lights have to do with the birth of Christ? You might wanna read "You Call It Christmas, We Call It Yule" for an exploration of these connections), Easter too has adapted many ancient pagan symbols and customs in its observance.

Easter gets its name from the Teutonic goddess of spring and the dawn, whose name is spelled Oestre or Eastre (the origin of the word "east" comes from various Germanic, Austro-Hungarian words for dawn that share the root for the word "aurora" which means " to shine"). Modern pagans have generally accepted the spelling "Ostara" which honors this goddess as our word for the Vernal Equinox. The 1974 edition of Webster’s New World Dictionary defines Easter thus:

"orig., name of pagan vernal festival almost coincident in date with paschal festival of the church; Eastre, dawn goddess; 1. An annual Christian festival celebrating the resurrection of Jesus, held on the first Sunday after the date of the first full moon that occurs on or after March 21.

"The Vernal Equinox usually falls somewhere between March 19th and 22nd (note that the dictionary only mentions March 21st, as opposed to the date of the actual Equinox), and depending! upon when the first full moon on or after the Equinox occurs, Easter falls sometime between late-March and mid-April.

Because the Equinox and Easter are so close, many Catholics and others who celebrate Easter often see this holiday (which observes Christ’s resurrection from the dead after his death on Good Friday) as being synonymous with rebirth and rejuvenation: the symbolic resurrection of Christ is echoed in the awakening of the plant and animal life around us. But if we look more closely at some of these Easter customs, we will see that the origins are surprisingly, well, pagan! Eggs, bunnies, candy, Easter baskets, new clothes, all these "traditions" have their origin in practices which may have little or nothing to do with the Christian holiday.

For example, the traditional coloring and giving of eggs at Easter has very pagan associations. For eggs are clearly one of the most potent symbols of fertility, and spring is the season when animals begin to mate and flowers and trees pollinate and reproduce. In England and Northern Europe, eggs were often employed in folk magic when women wanted to be blessed with children. There is a great scene in the film The Wicker Man where a woman sits upon a tombstone in the cemetery, holding a child against her bared breasts with one hand, and holding up an egg in the other, rocking back and forth as she stares at the scandalized (and very uptight!) Sargent Howie.

Many cultures have a strong tradition of egg coloring; among Greeks, eggs are traditionally dyed dark red and given as gifts. As for the Easter egg hunt, a fun game for kids, I have heard at least one pagan teacher say that there is a rather scary history to this. As with many elements of our "ancient history," there is little or no factual documentation to back this up. But the story goes like this: Eggs were decorated and offered as gifts and to bring blessings of prosperity and abundance in the coming year; this was common in Old Europe. As Christianity rose and the ways of the "Old Religion" were shunned, people took to hiding the eggs and having children make a game out of finding them. This would take place with all the children of the village looking at the same time in everyone’s gardens and beneath fences and other spots. It is said, however, that those people who sought to seek out heathens and heretics would bribe children with coins or threats, and once those children uncovered eggs on someone’s property, that person was then accused of practicing the old ways. I have never read any historical account of this, so I cannot offer a source for this story (though I assume the person who first told me found it somewhere); when I find one, I will let you know! When I first heard it, I was eerily reminded of the way my own family conducted such egg hunts: our parents hid money inside colorful plastic eggs that could be opened and closed up again; some eggs contained pennies, some quarters and dimes and nickels, and some lucky kids would find a fifty-cent piece or silver dollar! In our mad scramble for pocket change, were my siblings and cousins and I mimicking the treacherous activities of children so long ago?

Traditional foods play a part in this holiday, as with so many others. Ham is the traditional main course served in many families on Easter Sunday, and the reason for this probably has to do with the agricultural way of life in old Europe. In late fall, usually in October, also known as the month of the Blood Moon, because it referred to the last time animals were slaughtered before winter, meats were salted and cured so they would last through the winter. Poorer people, who subsisted on farming and hunting, would often eat very sparingly in winter to assure their food supply would last. With the arrival of spring, there was less worry, and to celebrate the arrival of spring and of renewed abundance, they would serve the tastiest remaining cured meats, including hams. This also marked a seasonal end to eating cured foods and a return to eating fresh game (as animals emerged from hibernation looking for food), and no longer relying on stored root vegetables, but eating the young green plants so full of the vitamins and minerals that all living beings need to replenish their bodies in spring. Modern pagans can observe these same customs by eating the fresh greens and early vegetables abundant now: dandelion greens, nettles, asparagus, and the like.

There are some Witches who believe that fasting at the Equinox is very healthy and magical: it clears away all the toxins stored over winter, when we eat heavier foods to keep warm, and can create an altered state of consciousness for doing Equinox magic. By eliminating all the "poisons" from our diets for a few days (including sugar, caffeine, alcohol, red meats, dairy products, refined foods), and eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, we not only can shed a few pounds and improve the appearance of our hair and skin, but also improve our health over the long term. The overall benefit to health from an occasional cleansing fast helps strengthen our immune system, making our bodies more resistant to illness, and help us feel more alert and energetic. Try it! Be sure to "break" your fast slowly,! reintroducing your normal foods one at a time, instead of going from several days of fruits, grains and herbal tea to a feast of steak, potatoes and chocolate cake! The breaking of the fast can be incorporated into the cakes and wine portion of your ritual, or at the feast many Witches have afterwards.

Speaking of food, another favorite part of Easter for kids, no doubt, is that basket of treats! Nestled in plastic "grass" colored pink or green, we’d find foil wrapped candy eggs, hollow chocolate bunnies, jelly beans, marshmallow chicks (in pink, yellow or lavender!), fancy peanut butter or coconut eggs from Russell Stover, and of course our Mom always included one of the beautiful ceramic eggs she painted by hand. Like that other holiday where children are inundated with sugar (Hallowe’en), no one seems to know precisely where, when or how this custom began. And why are the baskets supposedly brought by a bunny???

There are some modern Witches and pagans who follow traditions that integrate the faery lore of the Celtic countries. It is customary to leave food and drink out for the fairies on the nights of our festivals, and it is believed that if the fairies are not honored with gifts at these times, they will work mischief in our lives. Certain holidays call for particular "fairy favorites." At Imbolc/Oimelc (February 2nd), for example, we leave gifts of dairy origin, like cheese, butter or fresh cream. At Lammas/Lughnasa (August 1st) we leave fresh grains or newly-baked bread. At Samhain, nuts and apples are traditional. And at Ostara, it is customary to leave something sweet (honey, or mead, or candy) – could this be connected to the Easter basket tradition? Perhaps a gift of sweets corresponds to the sweet nectar gathering in new spring flowers?

To refer again to The Wicker Man, the post office/candy shop where May Morrison works (she is the mother of Rowan Morrison, the young girl who is supposedly missing and who Sargent Howie has come to Summerisle to find) offers a large selection of candies shaped like animals. When Sargent Howie says "I like your rabbits" Mrs. Morrison scolds him saying "Those are hares! Lovely March hares, not silly old rabbits!" And when Howie goes to dig up the grave of Rowan Morrison (who it turns out is neither dead nor missing) he finds the carcass of a hare, and Lord Summerisle tries to convince him that Rowan was transformed into a hare upon her death. Clearly this is an illustration of the powerful association with animals that many ancient cultures have (Summerisle being a place where time has seemingly stood still and where the pagan pursuit of pleasure and simple agricultural ways define the way of life).

The forming of candy into the shape of rabbits or chicks is a way to acknowledge them as symbols; by eating them, we take on their characteristics, and enhance our own fertility, growth and vitality. For clearly the association of rabbits with Easter has something to do with fertility magic. Anyone who has kept rabbits as pets or knows anything about their biology has no question about the origin of the phrase "f**like a bunny." These cute furry creatures reproduce rapidly, and often! Same with chicks, who emerge wobbly and slimy from their eggs only to become fluffy, yellow and cute within a few hours. The Easter Bunny may well have its origin in the honoring of rabbits in spring as an animal sacred to the goddess Eastre, much as horses are sacred to the Celtic Epona, and the crow is sacred to the Morrigan. As a goddess of spring, she presides over the realm of the conception and birth of babies, both animal and human, and of the pollination, flowering and ripening of fruits in the plant kingdom.

Sexual activity is the root of all of life: to honor this activity is to honor our most direct connection to nature. At Beltane (April 31st-May 1st), pagans and Witches honor the sexual union of the god and goddess amid the flowers and fruits that have begun to cover the land; but prior to that, at Ostara, we welcome the return of the spring goddess from her long season of dormant sleep. The sap begins to flow, the trees are budding, the ground softens, ice melts, and everywhere the fragrance and color of spring slowly awakens and rejuvenates our own life force. I have always thought this had a lot to do with the tradition of wearing newly-bought or made clothes at Easter, in pastel spring colors.

Wearing such colors we echo the flowering plants, crocus, lilac, forsythia, bluebells, violets and new clothes allow us to feel we are renewing our persona. How many of us feel sort of "blah" after winter ends? Along with the fasting practice mentioned earlier, this is a time for many of us to create new beginnings in our lives: this can apply to jobs, relationships, living situations, lifestyle choices. But since the Equinox is such a potent time magically, and often falls in the period when Mercury is Retrograde, starting a new endeavor at this time can be problematic if we do not take care. One good way to avoid catastrophe is to engage in small, personally-oriented rites or activities: a new haircut, a new clothing style or make-up, a new exercise program, the grand old tradition of spring cleaning, a new course of study: all of these are relatively "safe" ways to begin anew without risking the weirdness and unpredictability of Mercury Retrograde. This is a very powerful time to do magic, not only because of the balancing of the earth’s energies, but because of the way our own beings echo the earth’s changes. We are literally reborn as we emerge from our winter sleep, ready to partake of all the pleasures of the earth, and to meet the challenges we will face as the world changes around us daily. As we greet and celebrate with our pagans brothers and sisters of the Southern Hemisphere (for whom the Vernal Equinox more closely resembles the beginning of autumn, in physical terms!), we remember that Spring is not only a season; it is a state of mind.

Blessed Be in the Season of Spring! Go Forth and Flower!

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb – kinda – The Magick of Houseplants

February 17, 2010 at 10:41 am (Associations, Flowers, Garden, Herb, Home, Magic, Ostara, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

The Magick of Houseplants
by
Elizabeth Farrell

Garden Witchery is a wonderful way for Pagans of any belief to connect with the element of earth. All plants have their own special energies and magickal influences, but this article will focus primarily on houseplants. Because space can be limited for many Pagans and Witches, keeping houseplants or a small indoor garden in the home can offer various types of assistance in daily spiritual work.

Besides being naturally connected with the element of earth, the energy of each plant is also connected to its own individual element, is ruled by one of the planets and has either feminine or masculine energy. For example, Lavender is a masculine plant ruled by Mercury and its element is Air. These connections, or correspondences, are the backbone of ritual and spell work but they are also handy to know about when it comes to strengthening or softening the energy in your home.

Different types of plants need different care, so it’s a good idea to do a little research into the proper care of a plant when you purchase it. Also keep in mind that some plants are toxic in nature and should be kept well out of the reach of children and pets. For instance, English Ivy is highly toxic in nature and is best not kept in a house with young children. If you are in doubt about a plant’s toxicity, call your local plant nursery to ask for information.

The following is a list of common plants that you may wish to keep in your home, their magickal correspondences and energies.

Aloe:

  • Gender- feminine
  • Planet-Moon
  • Element-water

The sap of the Aloe Vera plant is well known for its ability to soothe minor burns and insect bites but this plant also has properties that are magick in nature. It helps to ward off negativity and is good to work with in protective/healing rituals and spells. Aloe is also said to be of assistance in preventing household accidents and its energy is especially useful in the kitchen area.

Crocus:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet- Venus
  • Element- water

Helps to nurture love and peaceful visions. When placed next to your bed it can help promote peaceful and creative dreams.

Cacti:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet-Mars
  • Element- fire

All Cacti are protective in nature and can absorb negativity. They also help to protect against intrusions of any kind and burglaries.

Cyclamen:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Venus
  • Element-water

Cyclamen is good for use in love and fertility spells and helps to promote passion.

Fern:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet- Mercury
  • Element-air

Keeping potted ferns in your home or on your patio helps to encourage protection and health. The fern is a favorite of fairies and carrying or wearing a sprig of a fern frond is said to aid in finding treasure.

Ivy:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Saturn
  • Element-water

Ivy, in all its varieties, is a plant that brings protection, fertility and faithfulness. A sacred plant in Wicca, it is often associated with the Holly tree.

Orchid:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Venus
  • Element-water

Romantic in nature, the orchid is often used for love charms and spells. It can also help to enhance psychic powers and creative visions.

Venus Flytrap:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet- Mars
  • Element-fire

The Venus Flytrap is a good love attractant and can also be kept in the home for protection.

Lily:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Moon
  • Element-water

Protective in nature, the lily promotes happiness, love, harmony and peace. Can be very toxic so be sure to keep all lily plants away from children and pets.

Use your own intuition when it comes to finding the right plants for your home and how to arrange them. Also, by communicating with the plants you currently have in your home, you can find the kind of magick and energy that your plants have to offer you.

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This is Your Spell (and Herbal Info) – A Witch’s Garden Grimoire

June 18, 2009 at 10:16 am (Associations, Flowers, Garden, Healing, Herbs, Litha, Lore, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Plants, Spells, Tuesday, Witch)

A Witch’s Garden Grimoire
Unknown source

Midsummer and Gardening go so well together that doing herbal spells is a natural for this Sabbat. This Grimoire contains many herbal charms and spells for many different uses.

Wishing Spells and Charms

  • Calendula: Sprinkle dried bits of this flower under the bed. Makes all dreams come true and protects the sleeper from evil.
  • Dandelion: Sew tightly in a red flannel bag and wear around the neck to make wishes come true.
  • Huckleberry Leaves: Burn in the bedroom before going to sleep to make all dreams come true within seven days.
  • Job’s Tears: As you count out seven seeds, concentrate on a wish you have in mind. Carry these seven seeds with you at all times for seven days and your wish should have come true before the week is gone
  • Lavender: Place some Lavender under your pillow just before retiring and think about your wish. If you dream about anything at all connected with the wish this means that it will come true.
  • Lotus Root: Mark one side of the root Yes and the other side No and then make your wish as you toss the root into the air. You will then know if your wish was meant to be.
  • Spearmint: Write your wish on a piece of paper and wrap in a few Spearmint leaves. Place these in a red cloth and sew it up with red thread. Keep it in a safe and secret place. By the time the scent is gone your wish should have come true. If not, this means that it probably won’t for a long time to come.

Love Spells and Charms

  • Caraway: Protection, Passion. Add to love sachets and charms to attract a lover (physical sense) Carry the seeds to strengthen memory. Especially powerful to Gemini’s.
  • Corn Flowers: Sprinkle in the area where you and your mate argue the most. It is purported that it will help to alleviate discord and strife.
  • Damiana: Let some soak in a glass of wine for three hours. Thereafter sprinkle a small bit outside your front and back doors. Do this faithfully each day for 21 days, and it is said that before long your wandering lover will return to you.
  • Dill Seed: Add a few grains to bath water before going out to meet a person of the opposite sex. Said to make one irresistible.
  • Laurel: Worn by brides to guarantee a long and happy union.
  • Marjoram: To attract a husband, put a little in the corners of each room in your house. Remove and renew about once a month.
  • Orris Root: A love root, carried to attract the opposite sex and to make them love you dearly.
  • Rosemary: Give a special friend a sachet filled with Rosemary. This is supposed to induce warm feelings in another.
  • Skullcap: Supposedly if you place a wee bit in your lover’s shoes it will make that person unaffected by the charms of others.
  • Spikenard: Brew into a tea and wet the picture of a loved one with the water so they will never leave you.
  • Sweet Bugle: Crush a handful and place under your mattress to attract new lovers and possibly marriage prospects.

Protection Spells and Charms

  • Angelica: (root) Protection, Exorcism. Grow in gardens as a protection, Carry the root with you as an amulet. Burn the dried leaves in exorcism rituals.
  • Anise: Protection, Purification. A good, general cleansing bath is made with a handful of Anise seeds and a few Bay leaves. A pillow of Anise keeps away nightmares.
  • Ague Weed: This can be mixed with any incense and burned to break the power of a hex that has been placed on you.
  • Basil: Purification, Protection, Love, Money. Add to money incense, put a pinch of Basil in four corners of you home at the start of each season to bring prosperity your way. It is said that if you grow Basil in your garden, yell and scream at it, to make a strong plant.
  • Bay Leaves: One in the corner of each room of a house is believed to protect all who dwell there, as well as the house itself. If you carry it on your person it is reputed to protect against witchcraft.
  • Bladderwrack: To be carried by the traveler as a protection, especially when traveling by water.
  • Blood Root: Place on windows and doorways to protect against curses and evil spirits from entering.
  • Cinquefoil: Take an egg and cut a small hole in one end. Drain the contents and let the shell dry. Then stuff the shell with Cinquefoil and reseal the hole with tape. As long as this egg is kept in the home it will be protected from evil forces.
  • Clover: Soak one tablespoonful in one cup of vinegar for three days. Then strain and sprinkle the vinegar in each corner of every room. All alien spirits will leave the premises.
  • Elm Bark: To eliminate slander against you bury some in a box along with a piece of paper that contains the name of the individual who is speaking adversely about you.
  • Pearl Moss: Sprinkle this across the front doorway of the home to only allow good spirits to enter (this actually works well in conjunction with the below Sulphur one).
  • Sulphur: Burn at midnight near your back door to ward off evil.

Good luck, Prosperity and Employment Spells and Charms

  • Alfalfa: Kept in the home to protect the owner against poverty.
  • Basil: Soak a heaping teaspoonful in a pint of water. This water is then sprinkled in a place of business to attract money and success. If you have a job interview coming up, you can sprinkle this outside of the building where you hope to be employed (careful though – if someone sees you it won’t help your job prospects very much!).
  • Cascara Sagrada: Used to help win court cases when brewed into a strong tea and sprinkled around the bed the night before a court appearance.
  • Chamomile: Brew and use as a hand wash before playing card games or gambling.
  • Dragon’s Blood Reed: Carry in your purse or pocket for good luck. Here’s a new one on me – supposedly if you place it under your mattress it aids in curing impotency.
  • Galangal Root: One of these carried to court is said to make the judge/jury feel favorably inclined toward you.
  • Irish Moss: Ah, me friends, ’tis said that if one places this under the carpets in their home that it will bring vast fortune.
  • John The Conqueror Root: Just before going out to play a game of chance, wash your hands in water in which it has been boiled.
  • Little John: Place one in Holy water to bring good luck to everything you attempt.
  • Low John Root: It is said that if one wraps money around this root the money will multiply threefold.
  • Silver Leaf: A potent good luck charm when kept in the home.
  • Tonka Beans: Carry with you in a red flannel bag to attract good fortune and financial success. Particularly helpful before a business negotiation or job interview.
  • Violets: Sprinkle some petals in the corners of your home. It is said to invite positive entities that can assist with healing and bringing money and luck unto you.

Health Spells and Charms NOTE: Illness should be treated by a medical professional! None of these are meant to replace the advice, treatment or medication prescribed by a qualified physician. However, it can’t hurt to use them with the proper medical treatment.

  • African Ginger: Place under the pillow to cure a sore throat.
  • Ash Tree Leaves: Place one tablespoonful of leaves in a bowl of water and leave it in the bedroom overnight while sleeping. In the morning it should be tossed out and then redone each night. Allegedly this will help to prevent illness.
  • Betony: Strengthens the body when worn as an amulet.
  • Caraway Seed: Place some in a small, white bag and sew with white thread. Hide in the crib or bed of a child (this means tape it under the bed so there is no possible way a youngster has access to it!) to keep the child free from illness.
  • Coriander: Carry the seeds in a small bag to ward off disease and migraines.
  • Dill Seed: Tie some in a cloth and smell to help cure hiccups
  • Dog Grass: Sprinkle around the house to overcome depression. Do this for seven days and hopefully you will no longer despair.
  • Eucalyptus: Said to protect against colds if stuffed into the pillow one sleeps on.
  • Holy Herb: Use in bath water if you feel your sickness has been caused by a hex.
  • Masterwort: When sprinkled in shoes it is supposed to prevent tiredness and weakness. Mixed with oil and rubbed on the neck should help alleviate neck pain.
  • Mustard Seed: Carry with you at all times a few grains in a small bag, wallet or purse to guard against injury.
  • Quince Seed: When a few are carried in a red, flannel bag it will protect the wearer from physical attacks and harm.
  • Rose Buds: Place around sprains and bad bruises to help them heal quicker.
  • Rue: To relieve a headache lay down with some placed on the forehead. Wear at night next to the heart to regain health from minor illnesses.
  • Rosemary: Holding some while reading or completing tasks is said to improve memory.
  • Thyme: Burn in the home to attract good health to all occupants.
  • Valerian: This sewn into the pillow is supposed to calm nerves and bring about peaceful sleep.
  • Vervain: Worn as an amulet, Vervain is noted for its healing powers in curing fevers and poisoning.

Misc. Spells and Charms

  • Bay Leaves: Protection, clairvoyance, purification, healing. Burn the leaves to induce visions. Wear as an amulet to ward off negativity. Burn and scatter on the floor to purify area. Make a dream pillow of Bay, and put under your bed pillow to induce inspiration and prophetic dreams. For the best power do this with the full moon in Scorpio.
  • Catnip: Chewed by warriors for fierceness in battle. Large dried leaves are powerful markers in magical books. Give to your familiar (cat) to create a psychic bond with the animal.
  • Chamomile: Meditation, relaxation Prosperity. Use in prosperity charms to draw money. Burn as a relaxation incense for meditation. Make a tea with one tablespoon of Chamomile to 8 oz of water, and drink to relax or induce sleep
  • Cinnamon: Prosperity, Passion, Healing. Use in spells for prosperity. Will stimulate and excite the passions of the male. Mix with Myrrh for a good general propose incense. Tie 3 Cinnamon sticks together with a green ribbon and hang on front door of business to bring customers. Lowers blood sugar.
  • Dragons Blood: Energy, Protection, purification. You will know if you have the real thing, if it burns pinkish/red smoke. Put a pinch in with your magical tools, to keep unwanted eyes away
  • Elder Flowers: Sacred to the White Lady and midsummer solstice. The Druids used it to both bless and curse. Burn at Beltane to comfort the Fairies.
  • Frankincense (tears): Burn to raise vibrations, to purify your Magical working area. Burn during sunrise rituals of all kinds. Mix with Cumin for a powerful protective incense useful for all general workings. There is nothing that smells like it, soapy, sensual and the smoke is thick and white.
  • Hops: Wonderful in healing sachets and incenses. A pillow of the dried fruit like buds, helps bring on sleep. String a bunch of the fresh buds and hang in bedroom of sick person, for improvement in health
  • Juniper Berries: Used with Thyme in Druid incense for visions. Juniper berries strewn at the door discourages thieves. The mature berries can be strung and hung in the house to attract love. Crush berries in a mortar to release their pine filled aroma.
  • Lavender Flowers: Love, purification. Used in love sachets and incense. Put 2 handfuls of  Lavender Flowers into a square of cheese cloth and tie with a purple ribbon. Use this aromatic washcloth in place of your usual one. Lavender was thrown into Midsummer fires by witches as a sacrifice to the ancient Gods. Also used as an insect repellent.
  • Life Everlasting Flowers: Purify, protection. Use in charm bags to keep young. Burn at Midsummer to honor the maiden. Bundle flowers with white ribbons and put under pillow to give sweet dreams.
  • Mandrake (Mayapple): Place in the home for a powerful protective charm.The roots are used in image magic, as the American version (Mayapple) and the European version, resemble the limbs of humans.
  • Marigold: Magical attributes include prophesy, legal matters, the psychic, seeing magical creatures, love, clairvoyance, dreams, business or legal affairs and renewing personal energy. Be sure to gather your Marigolds for magical workings at noon. A fresh Marigold flower can be worn to court for a favorable outcome of a trial. If you place Marigold in your mattress, you will have prophetic dreams… and if you place it under your mattress it will make whatever you dream come true. Since the Marigold embodies the sun, it can make a person more attractive and confident. Add Marigold to your bath water to make this happen. A vase of fresh and bright Marigolds in a room brings a renewed surge of life to those in the room. The leaves can be eaten as a salad and a yellow dye has also been extracted from the flower, by boiling.
  • Mistletoe: Protection, love. Wear as a protective amulet. A good anti-lightning charm.Extinguishes fires. Hang Mistletoe and kiss the one you want, hence Kissing under the Mistletoe.
  • Mugwort: Clairvoyance, Scrying, Protection. Rub this herb on Magic Mirrors and Crystal Balls to strengthen their powers. Add to scrying, lairvoyance and divination incenses. Use 3 tablespoons to 1\2 gallon spring (or rain) water to cleanse your Magical Mirrors, crystals and stones. It is used in magic as a love divining herb. To experience interesting dreams that are said to reveal one’s future, stuff a pillow with about a pound of this herb and sleep on it. The Indians used a decoction of the leaves for colds, bronchitis, rheumatism, and fever, and a poultice for wounds. The fresh juice is used to ease the itch of poison oak. To cure a headache, stick a leaf up your nose.
  • Myrrh: Myrrh is used in magic for protection, peace, exorcism, healing, consecration, blessing, meditation and heightening spirituality. As an incense Myrrh can be used to help deepen mediation and to aid contemplation. Myrrh can be used in any ritual to the Goddess Isis, since Myrrh is a Goddess plant of the moon’s sphere and is sacred to Isis. Myrrh can also be burned so that its smoke can purify and protect an area, and the smoke can also be used to consecrate and bless objects like rings, amulets, and ritual tools.
  • Passionflower: Passionflower has uses in protection and love magic. When Passionflower is used, it calms and brings peace to the home. You can sprinkle dried or fresh Passionflower over the doorsteps of your house or apartment to keep harm away. If you carry some of the herb in an amulet bag, you will make friends easier since it will work to increase your personal charisma making you more attractive and more likable. Place Passionflower in a dream pillow and it will help you get a good nights sleep. Place it in power bundles and use in love spells to attract love. You can also burn it as an incense to promote understanding.
  • Pennyroyal: Put in the shoes to prevent weariness. Add to summer incenses and to prevent getting lost in the woods. Tie it to your bedpost to keep mosquitoes away. It is said to make one more aware and alert, and increase brain power. Brings peace between husband and wife when kept in a small bowl on a table or a dresser in the home. Carry Pennyroyal when traveling by water and never know the pangs of seasickness.
  • Rose: Rose is known as the herb of love. Add Rose bud petals to bath water to conjure up a lover. Put red Rose petals in a red velvet bag and pin this under your clothes to attract love – or you can wear Rosehips as beads to bring love to you. Rose oil and Rose incense are both used in love spells. If you wash your hands with Rose water before mixing love potions, the potions will be stronger. Different color Roses have different meanings so you can use Roses to give someone a message magically. These are what the different Rose colors mean:
    • Red: love you
    • White: I love you not
    • Yellow: I love another
    • Moss: I admire you from afar
    • Pink: My love for you is innocent
    • Orange: I love you vigorously
    • Amethyst: I will love you forever
    • Wild: I love you because you are fair and innocent
  • Rosemary: Wear a chaplet of Rosemary to aid in the memory. A good protective sachet for boat and ship passengers. Make a fresh wreath of rosemary for protection, hang in the home. Burn Rosemary and Juniper for a recuperation incense. Use for remembrance in Samhain rituals.
  • Sage: Burn to purify a ritual area or magical tools. Used as a main ingredient in smudge sticks and herb bundles. Put in with Tarot cards or Runes to protect and keep clean. Sage is used for fertility, longevity, wishes, wisdom, protection, money attraction, purification, healing, and health magic. Sage that is being gathered for magical use should not be cut with a metal knife or athame. It is said that if you eat Sage you will become more wise and also immortal. Sage is often an herb used at handfastings since it will help bring about a long life and domestic virtue for the happy couple. Sage can be added to almost any healing spell. A good healing amulet may be made by putting a clove of Garlic, a bit of Eucalyptus and Cinnamon, two pinches of Sage and one pinch of Saffron into a small blue bag. This bag can then be worn or carried to promote healing.
  • St. Johns Wort: Noted for its calming effect, valuable for nervous disorders such as insomnia, depression and bedwetting. The oil has remarkable soothing and healing action when rubbed into painful joints and strained muscles. Celtic tradition held that the druids wore it in battle for invincibility. Burn to exorcise negative spirits. Make a tea with 1 tablespoon to 8 oz of water, for a strong antidote for depression.
  • Thistle (Blessed): Thistle has great value in protection spells and also is used to bring spiritual and financial blessings. If Thistle is thrown into a fire, it will protect the thrower from being struck by lightning during summer storms. Thistle can be carried in an amulet bag for joy, energy, vitality, and protection – in fact men who carry Thistle become better lovers! Thistle can be burned as an incense for protection and also to counteract hexing. Thistle powder can also be added to ritual baths to give added protection. Thistle can be grown in the garden to ward of those dreaded vegetable thieves, and a bowl of fresh Thistle will give off such good strengthening energies that it is the perfect thing to have in a sickroom. Thistle is a wonderful material to use to make magic wands for spirit conjuring and magical walking sticks. In England, the wizards of old were said to select the tallest thistle and use it as a wand or walking stick.
  • Valerian: Love, Harmony. Use in love spells and to keep fighting couples together. Use in a bath sachet for a calming effect. Valerian has been used to treat nervous tension and panic attacks. Use 1 tablespoon to 8 oz water for a calming tea.
  • Wormwood: Throw onto fires on Samhain to gain protection from the spirits roaming the night. One of the major ingredients in Absinthe. Burn in incense to raise spirits.
  • Yarrow: Love, Clairvoyance. Used in love sachets and marriage charms, as it has the power to keep a couple together happily for seven years. Worn as an amulet it wards of negativity. A tea made of 1 tablespoon to 8 oz of water will enhance one’s powers of perception. Held in the hand it stops all fear. The beautiful flowers are a welcome addition to any magical altar. Yarrow has been nicknamed A Witch’s Best Friend.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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