Thursday This Is Your Spell – Midsummer Marigold Endurance Spell

June 17, 2010 at 9:43 am (Flowers, Garden, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Midsummer Marigold Endurance Spell
Unknown author

Write your birth-sign on a small stone in permanent pen. In a large flower pot, place the stone at the bottom. Plant a marigold on top, placing seven stones around the plant. As you work, chant:

"Sing me the song of seasons
Show me the sun’s delight
Open my heart for you radiance
Lead me towards the light."

The marigold is the flower of endurance that always turns its face toward the sun, following its path through the sky. This ritual will give you endurance.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday his Is Your Spell – Midsummer’s Day Herb Gathering Spell

May 27, 2010 at 9:41 am (Associations, Blessing, Garden, Herbs, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Midsummer’s Day Herb Gathering Spell
From Pagan’s Palace – Now Gone 😦

Midsummer’s Day is a traditional time for Witches in all parts of the world to gather herbs from their gardens or from the wild to use in potions, dream pillows, poppets, and other forms of spellcraft. To be recited on Midsummer’s Day, thrice before and thrice after gathering your herbs for magickal workings:

"Herbs of magick, herbs of power,
Root and bark, leaf and flower,
Work for me when charms are spoken,
Potions brewed and curses broken!"

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A – Plant an Elemental Garden

May 10, 2010 at 9:19 am (Air, Associations, Earth, Fire, Garden, Herbs, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, Monday, pagan, Plants, Spring, Water, Witch)

Plant an Elemental Garden
From About.com

If you’re a Pagan or Wiccan who’s into gardening, you might want to consider planting an elemental garden. The four classical elements are often associated with Pagan and Wiccan spirituality, so why not incorporate them into your gardening? Litha is a great time to work on your garden, so if you haven’t gotten out there digging in the dirt yet, now’s your chance! The sun is at its peak, the earth is nice and warm, and plants are growing all around. Move some of your existing plants (or put some new ones in) and create an elemental garden. By connecting different parts of your garden with the four elements, you can add a little bit of magic into your life each year. Here’s how to get started.

Before you plant anything, you’ll need to figure out how much space you have to work with. Ideally, you’ll want to make your elemental garden in a circle. To make a circle in your yard, figure out first where you want the center to be. Mark the center by driving a temporary stake into the ground. Next, figure out what diameter you want the circle to be. Using a piece of string tied to the top of the stake, walk around in a circle, marking the perimeter. You can do this with birdseed, a handful of dirt, or anything else you like. Once you’ve marked your circle, till up the soil. Although it’s good exercise to use a shovel, it’s also backbreaking work. If you’ve got a large space to cover, you may want to invest in a good rototiller.

Once you’ve tilled up the soil, figure out which way is north. You can do this easily with a compass, or if you know where the sun rises and sets, it shouldn’t be too hard to determine which way is east and which is west. After you’ve figured out your directions, divide your circle into quadrants, so that each direction has one quarter of the circle. Mark your spaces with stones. You can either use small ones, (don’t just throw away the ones you dig up!), or you can use large pavers

Each of the four directions is associated with an element. North is connected to Earth, East to Air, South to Fire and West to Water***. To plant your elemental garden, figure out which plants are connected with those particular elements – and this will vary depending on where you live. For example, Earth is associated with stability and security. Why not plant some herbs there that carry the same associations? Bryony, cinquefoil, honeysuckle, and pennyroyal * are all related to Earth.

For the East section of your garden, which is tied into the themes of Air, use plants connected with inspiration, wisdom and knowledge. Sage, marjoram, mugwort and members of the mint family are perfect for this quarter of the circle. In the South, select plants related to the passionate qualities of Fire, such as basil, betony, rosemary and rue. Finally, the West quadrant is where your Water-related plants should go – hyssop, yarrow, chamomile and ivy will do well in this section.

* Be cautious when selecting plants for your garden, and be sure to do your research. Some forms of pennyroyal are toxic and can cause miscarriage in pregnant women, and can be potentially fatal if ingested by small children.

As you dig a hole for each plant, you may wish to add a blessing. Get your hands in the dirt, dig in, and feel the soil. Thank the Earth for the gift it’s going to give you. As you place the plant or seeds in the hole, you might want to offer something like:

May the gods smile upon this plant,
bringing it strength and long life.

Or, you may prefer to offer a specific blessing for each quadrant – for the South section, offer a blessing of Fire, for the West, a blessing of Water, and so on. In some traditions, it’s popular to smudge the garden or perform some other purification rite after planting – after all, a garden is a sacred space.

If you’re going to spend any time in your elemental garden – and you’ll need to, if you don’t want your plants to die – it’s not a bad idea to add accessories that make you feel at home. It doesn’t have to be fancy, but you might want to consider some of the following:

  • Statues of the gods of your tradition
  • A gazing ball
  • A fountain or other water feature
  • A fire bowl
  • A small altar
  • A bench or chair for meditation
  • Wind chimes or bells
  • A prayer pole or decorative flag

To tie in the accessories to the elemental theme, consider a Water feature in the South corner, a small brazier to the West, a pile of stones in the North, or a decorative flag on the East portion. Any of these will be perfect for bringing you closer to the elements in your garden. Make your garden a place where you can sit and reflect, and it will indeed be a spiritual and magical place!

Do you live in an apartment or dorm room, or some other location with limited space? Don’t worry – you can still grow things! Container gardening makes it a breeze. Use flower pots, hanging baskets, or other items arranged in a group of four to create your elemental garden. You can even paint them with colors or symbols associated with the four cardinal directions. If you’re really strapped for space, use one container with four plants in it. For more ideas, be sure to visit our Container Gardening site at About.com.

***Note from Dawtch – I have said this numerous times, but just in case there’s a new reader out there, my PERSONAL associations are different – North is Air, East is Earth. For more of my views, you can go here.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A – Creating a Bee House

April 12, 2010 at 9:47 am (Beltane, Children, Crafts, Flowers, Garden, Kids, Monday, pagan, Witch, Witchlets)

Creating a Bee House
Found at Proud to be Pagan

Besides bees that nest in hives of thousands, some bees prefer to live alone. Bumble bees and carpenter bees are just two examples of bees which love to nest in holes. You can help these wonderful pollinating creatures by building an easy bee house.
You will need:

  • block of wood 6x6x6 inches
  • a drill with a 3/16 inch bit
  • an eye screw
  • some string

You will need an adult to help you with the drilling. Drill about 12 holes in random places on one side of the block 5 inches deep. These will be the individual bee houses. Be sure that the holes are drilled at just a slight upward angle to prevent the rain from coming in. Screw the eye screw into the very center of the top of the bee house and tie a piece of short heavy string to it. Hang your bee house in a tree where you think the bees would be safe from the elements. As the wood ages it will turn a nice gray color and blend in with the surroundings. Your bees will return again and again to visit your house and stay around to pollinate your gardens.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Friday Form A Circle – Celli Laughing Coyote’s Beltane – A Solitary Ritual

March 26, 2010 at 9:45 am (Ancestors, Beginnings, Circle, Earth, Friday, Garden, Magic, pagan, Plants, Ritual, Solitary, Witch)

Celli Laughing Coyote’s Beltane – A Solitary Ritual
by Celli Laughing Coyote
Found at
Tarna’s Mystic Realm

 

This can be done indoors or outdoors, please choose your plant accordingly. This is a good time to do your yearly tree planting also.

Needed:

  • altar set up
  • crystal
  • feather
  • tobacco or sage
  • fertilizer
  • tree
  • plant or seeds
  • some soil and a pot or prepared ground
  • water
  • a pan or basin of some sort – if you are inside in an area that is big enough to do some repotting and watering.

Pre-wet the potting soil so you don’t need to do much watering or dig hole for plant or tree. Cast circle in the usual way, Then say:

"I have come here to nurture and replenish our Mother, the Earth, by planting and caring for one of her children. So I show my love of her and Humanity. I have come here to bring forth a new life unto our Mother’s and Father’s service. For the greatest of blessings is service."

Smudge plant, crystal, potting soil and any fertilizer, feather and anything that will be placed into the soil/hole. Then meditate with the crystal for a few moments upon the purpose of this ritual. Then: (substitute your own deities if you wish), add small amount of soil to pot and say:

"Grandfather Eagle, Bless this Child of Earth with clean air for growth."

Place feather in pot/hole and say:

"Grandmother Rabbit, Bless this Child of Earth with passion for growth."

Place ash from smudge holder in hole [make sure it is out]. Then place plant in pot with dirt about 1/2 the way up and say:

"Grandfather Bear, Bless this Child of Earth with sufficient water for growth."

Pour Water into hole – save some water for the end of the ritual, and say:

"Grandmother Buffalo, Bless this Child of Earth with sufficient food for growth."

Place fertilizer in hole or pour a little more water in if it is the kind that you mix with water. Say:

"Great Spirit, Bless this Child of Earth with your protection."

Place Tobacco/sage in hole. Say:

"Mother Earth, Bless this Child of Earth with your Nurturing Love."

Place what Crystal in hole. Say:

"Ancestors and Totem Spirit, Bless this Child of Earth with growth and your Guidance."

Place the extra smudging sage in hole. Fill in the pot with dirt. If you have a song or poetry say it at this time. pour the rest of the water over the plant (please don’t drown the plant in water) and say:

"Blessed Be!"

Bless and eat your cakes and wine. If your plant is outdoors give your offerings to the plant – if it is indoors or in a pot just leave a crumb and a drop and take the rest outdoors. Cake tends to have sugars in it and it could cause mildew or encourage bugs to live in your plants. Close your circle as usual.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Green Abundance Drink

March 16, 2010 at 9:54 am (Blessing, Cooking, Garden, Magic, pagan, prosperity, Tuesday, Witch)

Green Abundance Drink
by Patricia Telesco
from
A Witch’s Beverages & Brews

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup diced broccoli
  • 4 Brussels sprouts
  • 1 sprig parsley
  • 1 cup tomato juice (or 2 whole tomatoes)
  • 2 stalks celery
  • 3 scallions
  • 1 cup asparagus
  • 1 cup alfalfa sprouts
  • salt and pepper to taste

First, make sure to clean your ingredients under warm water. If possible, buy organically grown fruits and vegetables to eliminate the ingestion of pesticides. Remove all leaves, seeds, rinds, and bruised parts before putting the  components in your blender/juicer. With the exception of potatoes, fruits and vegetables are predominantly juiced raw to obtain the highest content of nutrients. The all the remains is pulping the ingredients thoroughly with your equipment. If you don’t want pulpy lumpy juice, run the mixture through a sieve when done. To recycle the left over pulp, put it in an equal portion of hot water and bring to a low rolling boil for an hour and strain again. This juice will not be as high in vitamins as the first extraction, but it will use your components economically. Be sure to refrigerate any unused portions. The remaining pith can be composted.

An alternative means of recycling pulp is to make fruit and vegetable wines out of it. In this instance you will be substituting an equal amount of pulp in place of whatever fruit or vegetable the recipe calls for.

Consider making this recipe during a waxing moon and stirring it clockwise so that abundance grows.

Asparagus was thought to be one of Julius Caesar’s favorite foods, contributing to his strength, and celery was used in Rome to prevent hangovers. In this case, the color of the beverage is a rich green to help encourage growth or improved finances. Visualize your need while you drink!

Magickal Associations: Abundance, good fortune, success.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Wednesday What Herb – kinda – The Magick of Houseplants

February 17, 2010 at 10:41 am (Associations, Flowers, Garden, Herb, Home, Magic, Ostara, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

The Magick of Houseplants
by
Elizabeth Farrell

Garden Witchery is a wonderful way for Pagans of any belief to connect with the element of earth. All plants have their own special energies and magickal influences, but this article will focus primarily on houseplants. Because space can be limited for many Pagans and Witches, keeping houseplants or a small indoor garden in the home can offer various types of assistance in daily spiritual work.

Besides being naturally connected with the element of earth, the energy of each plant is also connected to its own individual element, is ruled by one of the planets and has either feminine or masculine energy. For example, Lavender is a masculine plant ruled by Mercury and its element is Air. These connections, or correspondences, are the backbone of ritual and spell work but they are also handy to know about when it comes to strengthening or softening the energy in your home.

Different types of plants need different care, so it’s a good idea to do a little research into the proper care of a plant when you purchase it. Also keep in mind that some plants are toxic in nature and should be kept well out of the reach of children and pets. For instance, English Ivy is highly toxic in nature and is best not kept in a house with young children. If you are in doubt about a plant’s toxicity, call your local plant nursery to ask for information.

The following is a list of common plants that you may wish to keep in your home, their magickal correspondences and energies.

Aloe:

  • Gender- feminine
  • Planet-Moon
  • Element-water

The sap of the Aloe Vera plant is well known for its ability to soothe minor burns and insect bites but this plant also has properties that are magick in nature. It helps to ward off negativity and is good to work with in protective/healing rituals and spells. Aloe is also said to be of assistance in preventing household accidents and its energy is especially useful in the kitchen area.

Crocus:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet- Venus
  • Element- water

Helps to nurture love and peaceful visions. When placed next to your bed it can help promote peaceful and creative dreams.

Cacti:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet-Mars
  • Element- fire

All Cacti are protective in nature and can absorb negativity. They also help to protect against intrusions of any kind and burglaries.

Cyclamen:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Venus
  • Element-water

Cyclamen is good for use in love and fertility spells and helps to promote passion.

Fern:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet- Mercury
  • Element-air

Keeping potted ferns in your home or on your patio helps to encourage protection and health. The fern is a favorite of fairies and carrying or wearing a sprig of a fern frond is said to aid in finding treasure.

Ivy:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Saturn
  • Element-water

Ivy, in all its varieties, is a plant that brings protection, fertility and faithfulness. A sacred plant in Wicca, it is often associated with the Holly tree.

Orchid:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Venus
  • Element-water

Romantic in nature, the orchid is often used for love charms and spells. It can also help to enhance psychic powers and creative visions.

Venus Flytrap:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet- Mars
  • Element-fire

The Venus Flytrap is a good love attractant and can also be kept in the home for protection.

Lily:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Moon
  • Element-water

Protective in nature, the lily promotes happiness, love, harmony and peace. Can be very toxic so be sure to keep all lily plants away from children and pets.

Use your own intuition when it comes to finding the right plants for your home and how to arrange them. Also, by communicating with the plants you currently have in your home, you can find the kind of magick and energy that your plants have to offer you.

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This (kinda…) – Planting Magical Gardens

January 13, 2010 at 11:06 am (Associations, Decoration, Dragon, Dragons, Garden, Herb, Herbs, Magic, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

Planting Magical Gardens
From
Magical Gardens : Myth, Mulch & Marigolds
By Patricia Monaghan

Tender shoots, sleeping seeds,
Gentle Devas,
Watch over this garden,
Make it fertile, make it green,
Make it bloom.

All gardens are magical-and all gardeners are magicians. With the wizardry of earth and seed, the gardener transforms the world into a place of beauty, power, and healing. This year, acknowledge the connection between gardening and magic deliberately by creating a sacred space dedicated to your craft. Perhaps it will be a small space filled with significant plants and symbols-one to admire from your window-or it might be a larger space, big enough for meditations, invocations, and general witching work. Your garden might be dedicated to a deva or divinity; it might recall an ancient ritual or myth in its selection and placement of plants. Your dreams and traditions will tell you how to build your own Witches’ garden. Here are a few ideas to inspire you.

A Witches’ Pentacle Garden

The pentacle, the witch’s symbol, makes a simple shape for a garden of mixed perennial and annual flowers. To construct such a garden, find a sunny spot of any size and dig out a circular bed. Within it, "draw" a pentacle by stringing twine among five posts, set equally distant around the circle. This will create a central pentagon. Fill it with plants whose names express your craft: "Diana"; the "daylillies" named "Merry Witch" and "Wicked Witch", "Witch’s Thimble" and "Moon Witch"; and "Magic Lilies", whose flowers bolt surprisingly directly from the ground, to bloom with extravagant fragrance.

Plant the arms of your starry pentacle with light-green chamomile around a filling of darker-green mint; then place round clumps of Dianthus "Essex Witch" at each point of the star. Surround this whole design with a circle of green parsley, and densely plant dainty sweet alyssum as the pentacle’s background. Your pentacle is now ready to shine back at the night’s stars-and at you.

A Two-Headed Flower Dragon

Dragons in the garden? Why not? As symbols of the element of water, dragons should be welcome among your flowers. Try constructing a garden in the shape of a two-headed dragon, called an amphisbaena. Use a hose to outline a circle. Making a opening in the circle, create an inner circle offset from the first, forming snaky "dragon heads" at the entry. Then build a scaly back at the thickest part of the circle, with two trellises planted with "Magic Dragon" roses and separated by several feet. Opposite, make eyes with dwarf Japanese holly called "Green Dragon"; surround them with the ground-covering liriope called "Silver Dragon", which will form a soft hair to offset the dragon’s eyes.

A band of perennial creeper "Dragon’s Blood" sedum forms the belly of your dragon. Behind it and before the trellises, establish drifts of "False Dragonhead". Finally, on the outer edges of the garden, plant the scaly surge called "Jade Dragon". Between the trellises, place a bench, then add porcelain pots with dragon designs at its sides. Your garden will never thirst with such a protector guarding it.

Central Africa was terrorized by the mokelembembe, Ethiopia by the dragon of Silene, Italy by the tatzelworm, France by the peluda and tarasque. In Scandinavia, Fafnir struck fear into hearts while England was terrorized by the Mordiford wyvern and the Lambton worm. Dragons and dragon deities are found in the mythology of every continent, from Australia (where the bunyip reigns) to subarctic Canada (where we find tales of dragon-whales). Sea lizard, dragonet, basilisk, amphipter, pyrali, sirrush – these are some of the names given to this fierce and often fearsome figure. Its form is almost as variable as its name, for it appears winged and wingless, serpentine and footed, with a huge tail or none at all. Whatever its form, however, the dragon is acknowledged the world over. The culture to which the dragon has been most symbolically important is that of China, where ancient emperors reserved to themselves the right to display the image of the riveted dragon, while their attendants could claim only the forted.

Ancient China saw the dragon as a complex creature with the head of a camel, eyes of a demon, horns of a stag, a cow’s ears, a snake’s neck and a clam’s belly. Its feet were those of tigers, its claws those of eagles, and its 117 scales are those of a fish – 81 of them beneficial, 36 malignant. A creature of earth, water, sky, the dragon’s special role was as intermediary between and among these parts of the cosmos. A Chinese dragon lived an incredibly long time. Perhaps 3,000 years passed from the time one hatched from its multicolored egg to its impressive maturity. The dragon passed through many stages, living as a water snake when young, then growing a carp’s head and becoming a fish for almost a thousand years. It took another 500 years to grow the stag’s horns on its head. Lastly, its branching wings thrust out – taking more than a thousand years to do so. Once Mature, a dragon could take on one of many possible tasks. The ti-lung protected streams and rivers. The fu-ts’ang lung guarded treasure. The yu lung helped mortals pass examinations. A few were given especially important tasks, such as that of the Yellow Dragon of the River Lo, which unveiled the trigrams of the I Ching to humankind.

In Europe, the dragon appears as a powerful creature with whom combat is the ultimate test for a hero. While some claim the dragon is a symbol of evil, less dualistic thinkers have interpreted the dragon’s mythic role as that of ‘guardian at the gates’, protecting spiritual secrets from those not strong enough, or not yet ready, to understand them. Thus St. George, slaying the dragon, becomes an image of a hero conquering his own weaknesses and fears in order to enter a greater spiritual initiation, rather than an emblem of right’s might.

Why a dragon garden? Why invite this fierce being to your doorstep? There are two reasons to consider adding dragon energy to your garden. Firstly is the dragon’s connection with the forces of underground power, especially underground water. Secondly is the dragon nature of gardening itself, for in encountering the willful ways of our gardens, we encounter the lessons our spirit needs to learn. Every gardener is, to some extent, St. George slaying the demons of pride and grandiosity, of carelessness and excessive control. A dragon garden thus makes visible the soul’s struggle with itself that is the essence of conscious gardening. In welcoming the dragon into our gardens, we honor the generations of gardeners who have struggled with the energies of the earth and learned from that struggle.

A Spiral of Trees

It is especially appropriate to center a dragon garden on trees, for these long-lived woody plants have symbolic meanings similar to the dragon itself; the tree, like the dragon, is a being of many levels. Its hidden roots are deep underground and its trunk points upward into the sky. Like the dragon, the tree partakes of the three levels; below, middle earth and above. Spiraling in to its central tree, a stunning dragon’s eye pine, this garden grove should be placed in a sunny, open part of your property. As the shrubs and trees mature, they will provide substantial shade as well as a secret meditation spot where you can encounter your own dragon energy.

You will need a space that is between forty and fifty feet in diameter to make both trees and gardener happy. Place this garden where you wish to eliminate an unattractive view, where you wish to provide more privacy, or where you want a deeply shaded retreat for oppressively hot days. Note that this, unlike most of the gardens in this book, requires a warm climate, most of the trees are not hardy beyond zone six. The tree that forms the center of this spiral-pathed garden grows to a significant height, perhaps sixty feet within twenty years. The trees and shrubs that spiral out from it diminish in height to small shrubs at the garden path’s entry. Thus, as you follow the short path into the garden, you have a sense of entering a forest of increasing depth and mystery. At the spiral’s center, place a bench or several rustic chairs to encourage meditation and conversation. Although this garden will take a decade for its unique character to emerge, it will become a favorite haunt for residents and visitors as it grows into its full majesty.

The garden is shaped in a spiral, a reference both to the spiraling kundalini energy of the dragon and to the shape these mythic creatures often assume in Asian art, their tails stretching out from their circled bodies. The garden’s central tree is the unusual dragon’s-eye pine, named for its long needles banded with red and green rings. Next to it are two tall, bluish columns of Chinese Dragon spruce with unusual purplish gray bark. Spiraling beyond are three pyramidal Black Dragon Japanese cedars, whose bright green growing tips dot the dark older foliage. Next, comes three evergreen Japanese holly of the variety called Black Dragon; these mounding shrubs bear dark green clustered leaves on intricately twisting branches. Three Dragon azaleas will grow to five feet tall, bearing masses of brilliant red flowers in mid spring; their dense evergreen foliage provides privacy at the opening to the garden. Finally, two tiny Green Dragon Japanese holly form the dragon’s tail.

Around this tree spiral, plan drifts of three plants: Dragon Claw and Marbled Dragon ivy, the first with waxy deep cut leaves, the second with white veined multi-toned leaves; and Silver Dragon liriope, a magnificent variegated lily-turf groundcover whose spikes of lavender flowers will brighten the path in late summer. Draw the groundcovers out at least two feet beyond the last holly bush, bringing the dragon’s tail to as sharp a point as possible. Once the plantings are in, pave the path with cedar chips or other natural material. A stone or paved path is inappropriate to the feeling of a forest glade that you are striving to create. As the pines and spruce mature, they will add their litter to the pathways, creating a more natural ambiance.

The Artemisia Glade

The common garden plant artemisia is said to have so delighted the wildwood goddess Artemis that she named it after herself. In her honor, establish a little glade of her favorite flower. Find a narrow area with good Sun, then fill it with drifts of the silver-leafed plants. Given Artemis’ penchant for wilderness, be sure to avoid regimented rows! Begin by establishing focal points with tall "Artemisia lactiflora" (white mugwort). Then add sculptural accents with fragrant "Artemisia California montara" (California sagebrush), a gracefully cascading mounding shrub that will grow to two feet tall. Opposite, place "Artemis fiffolia", a small native shrub with airy, feathery foliage. Finally, fill in the remaining sections near the pathways with Artemisias "Silver Mound" and "Canescens", both smallish perennials which, once established, create attractive mounds of silvery gray, feathery foliage.

Artemisias, once established, thrive and expand. You may find gardener friends with older Artemisia beds which they are willing to divide. You might substitute some of the above suggestions with gift plants of similar heights and shapes. You can’t really mismatch Artemisias; the family demands similar culture and location, and the varieties of related foliage will be invariably pleasing.

Other Ideas

There are endless ideas for gardens based in myth and magic. Try a red garden for Mars, or a white one for the Moon. Build a zodiac garden with herbs for each planet. Divide the yard according to the wheel of the year, and create plantings for each festival. Place sculptures and symbols among the plants. Your garden is a magical place already. Let yourself make it even more so!

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Scarecrow Magic

August 27, 2009 at 10:30 am (Autum Equinox, Garden, Mabon, Magic, Moon, pagan, Plants, Protection, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Scarecrow Magic

Many of us have those fun garden scarecrows – or we may have made our own – in our gardens. These can be enchanted for abundance or protection. You will need your own scarecrow, ideally make one – it can even be a fairy! (but it doesn’t matter if shop bought,) place in your garden.

Do the first spell at a waxing moon for pulling protection to you, or during a waning moon to banish negativity/prowlers. Do at sunset or sun rise. Go to the scarecrow and say three times:

‘Made from straw and old rag clothes
This scarecrow will see more than we know
Ward my garden and protect me, too
Under midnight stars and skies of blue .’

Place your dominant hand on its head and say:

‘By the magic of the harvest this spell is spun
As I will, so mote it be, and let it harm none ‘

For abundance, again do at sunrise or set. Stand beside your scarecrow & say:

‘Jack in the straw bless this garden of mine
By the powers of fire, water, earth, air, and divine
These elements abundance will surely bring
Spin around us now in a multi-colored ring ‘

Visualize the element’s colors spinning around you and the scarecrow as you chant softly over and over

‘Earth, Air, Fire and Water’

holding out your hands, palm up. See it spinning faster and faster, from your ankles up and down, slowly raise your hands to shoulder height raising the energy up with you, when you feel you have raised enough, send it out with a toss of your hand. Crouch on the ground and place hands in soil to ground and center, saying:

‘My magic encircles this space above and below
I ground this spell into the Earth,
May it yield abundance, joy and love
So mote it be ”

Stand up and brush soil off hands….

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb is This – Headaches

August 12, 2009 at 10:53 am (Chamomile, Folklore, Garden, Headache, Healing, Herbs, Lore, Mabon, Magic, Mugwort, Oak, pagan, Pain Killers, Rue, Sage, Wednesday, Witch, Wormwood)

Headaches seem to be pretty frequent here lately, so with that in mind, here is what I have as far as headache remedies…

Fresh hellbore pressed against the forehead is said to stop a headache.

Lavender placed in a bath or on a warm cloth and breathed in, can cure headaches, even migraines.

To relieve a headache lay down with some rue placed on the forehead.

To cure a headache, stick a mugwort leaf up your nose.

Oregano has not been extensively studied medicinally, but is safe for consumption and is reported to be effective in treating headache

The Onondagas steeped pennyroyal leaves and drank the tea to cure headaches.

Rub geranium onto the temples to ease pain of headache

Willow and Oak, can help with headaches.

A decoction of angelica roots or seeds will aid an upset stomach, and relieve insomnia and headaches (one teaspoon plant to one cup water).

Rosemary is a good ingredient for teas treating flu, stress, and headaches.

Catnip tea (flavored with mint) gets rid of bad headaches (and relieves sore aching bones due to colds and flu. )

Cayenne is said to prevent heart attacks and also helps with depression and headaches.

Thyme is useful as a headache reducer Use both the leaves and flowers. This tea works best for headaches when taken cold.

Valerian promotes relaxation while counteracting the effects of insomnia, anxiety, nervousness, headaches, premenstrual syndrome and menstrual cramping

Rose Vinegar, prepared by steeping dried Rose petals in distilled vinegar, can be used to treat headaches.

Sage can be used as a tea to aid in digestion, and to relieve the discomfort of measles, dizziness, colds, fever, and headaches.

Holy Thistle can be used as a liver tonic and also is useful in migraine headache relief.

It is said that cucumber peel if bound around the head will cure a headache.

The ancient Egyptians used wormwood for headaches.

Headache Tea Recipe
Ingredients:

  • Lavender
  • Chamomile
  • Rosemary
  • Mint

Put a pinch each of lavender, chamomile, rosemary, and mint in a coffee
filter, and then place it in your coffee maker. Alternately, place the mixture
in a tea ball and leave it in a mug with enough water for one serving. Brew.
Within about 15 minutes to a half hour of drinking this mix, you should be
feeling quite tired and less sore. Be sure to have a comfortable place to
sleep, and your headache will disappear.

This is from The Herbal Home Remedy Book by Joyce Wardwell

Calming teas, such as catnip, lemon balm, lavender, rose petal and violet.

Rub the temples, use an infusion or ointment made from lavender, peppermint, thyme, or ginger.

A daily drink of ginger has been shown to be nearly as effective at preventing migraines as powerful prescription drugs, with none of the debilitating side effects. Ginger oil can be rubbed onto the temples during early warning signs to thwart the oncoming migraine completely.
To relieve pressure, soak your feet in a hot footbath with ginger or peppermint added to it. The bath draws the blood away from the head to the heat and provides a measure of relief.

This is a natural painkiller and is good for migraine headaches.

Ingredients:

  • ! tbsp Stinking Iris
  • 1 pt water

Chop Stinking Iris and add to 1 pt of water. Boil gently for 15 minutes. Strain. Take up to 3 tbsp. per day. Has a slight laxative effect so you may want to weaken it further.

Skullcap blend –
This is very good for nervous headaches.

  • 1 c. dried skullcap
  • 1 c dried sage
  • 1 c dried peppermint.

To use, pour 1 c. boiling water over 1 tsp. of herb mixture. Cover and let steep 10 minutes. Strain and sweeten. Drink warm as needed. Skullcap is especially effective in dispelling headaches. It relaxes the whole system and is non-addictive.

Soothing bath for Tension Headaches –

  • 1 Oz. mugwort
  • 1 oz valerian
  • 1 oz chamomile
  • 1 oz agrimony

Add to 1 pt of boiling water. Allow to simmer for 30 minutes. Strain and add to bath water. Very good for aching muscles.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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