Wednesday What Herb Is This (kinda…) – Natural Sun Care

June 16, 2010 at 9:38 am (Beauty, Herb, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Sun, Wednesday, Witch)

After Sun Lavender Remedy
source unknown

Ingredients:

  • 5 drops tea tree
  • 11 drops lavender
  • 3 ounces distilled water

Combine tea tree with lavender oil for a soothing after sun skin treatment. Place the mixture in a bottle with a spray atomizer attachment and mist skin whenever cooling relief is needed. Be sure to follow the application with a moisturizer.

Cool as a Cucumber Soak
by Renee Rouleau, From Self Magazine 1/90

Ingredients:

  • 6 large cucumbers, skin removed, pureed in a blender
  • 2 cups powdered milk
  • 2 tsp dried lavender flowers, if available (do not use Lavender Oil)

Cucumbers & milk are anti-inflammatory, and this works on sunburn. Mix the ingredients and pour into a clean bottle. Apply directly to skin or add 1 cup oft he mixture to a lukewarm bath and soak for 20 minutes.

Sunburn and Itchy Skin Bath Vinegars
Copyright by Nerys Purchon (AKA Ravenna Morgan)

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups (500 ml) vinegar
  • Lavender flowers
  • 1 tablespoon (20 ml) glycerin

Put the mixed herbs (see recipes below) into a large jar, cover with warm cider vinegar then with a vinegar proof lid. Stand in hot sun or other warm place (such as a crock pot) for 24 hours. Strain the vinegar, add more fresh herbs and repeat the above process. Repeat once more if very strong vinegar is desired.

To use: Pour 1/2 cup (125 ml) in the bath after the bath has been drawn, mix well with the water. Stay in the bath for 15-20 minutes to obtain the full effect, or add 2 teaspoons (10 ml) to 1 cup (250 ml) water as a facial skin toner, aftershave or after shower splash, or use neat as a deodorant, or use 1 tablespoon to 1 cup warm water as a hair rinse.

Natural Sunscreen
From Herbs for Health and Healing by Kathi Keville.

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz sesame oil
  • 2 oz aloe vera gel
  • 1 tsp vitamin E oil
  • 24 drops lavender essential oil

Combine ingredients. Shake well before using. Remember, this will not provide total sun protection.

Soothing Summer Body Spray Recipe
From
Pioneer Thinking

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon witch hazel
  • 1 teaspoon lemon essential / fragrance oil
  • 1 teaspoon cucumber essential / fragrance oil
  • 1 cup water

For a refreshing cool feeling, make an after shower spray by combining all the ingredients. Place in a pump spray bottle.Note: Don’t use if you have sensitive skin, the lemon may irritate it.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This – Scented Oils And Their Magical Powers

February 24, 2010 at 10:33 am (Associations, Herb, Herbs, Lore, Magic, Oils, Ostara, pagan, Wednesday, Witch)

Scented Oils And Their Magical Powers

It has long been one of man’s beliefs that different scents affect us on many levels including the spiritual One of the main reasons for perfumes and colognes is this belief. Here is a brief list of properties in part from a list distributed by Connections Candles, a company that makes candles and sells them at metaphysical gatherings.

  • Acacia: Possessing high spiritual vibrations, this oil is worn to aid meditation and to develop psychic powers. Some also use it to anoint their altars, censers, and candles.
  • All-Spice: Very vitalizing. Gives added determination and energy, excellent for convalescents. Anoint daily.
  • Almond: Almond oil, the symbol of wakefulness to the Egyptians, is used in prosperity rituals (anointing candles, money, etc.) and also added to money incenses.
  • Anise: A boon to clairvoyance, it is often added to a ritual bath preceding any attempt at divination. It is also worn during divinatory rituals.
  • Apple: Peace of mind, relaxation, love, wisdom.
  • Apple Blossom: Wear to promote happiness and success. Anoint candles during love rituals. Add to bath to aid relaxation.
  • Basil: The scent of basil causes sympathy between two people so wear to avoid major clashes. It creates harmony of all kinds. Prostitutes used to wear it in Spain to attract business.
  • Bayberry: Anoint green candles for prosperity in the home. Brings "luck to your home and gold to your pocket." A magnetic oil to be worn by men.
  • Benzoin: This oil brings peace of mind. It is used in purification ceremonies. A drop or two smoldering on a charcoal block will effectively clear the area with billowing clouds of smoke.
  • Bergamot: Used in protective rituals and also in drawing prosperity. Wear on the palm of each hand.
  • Camphor: Wear to strengthen psychic powers. Also anoint yourself when you have decided to break off with a lover, or when they have done so with you and you find it hard to let go.
  • Carnation: This is an oil of power. It is used as an energy restorer after exertion, as an aid to healing, and in consecration ceremonies. Should be worn when extra energy for a ritual is desired.
  • Cedar: Instills confidence, protection from misery and misfortune.
  • Cinnamon: A high-vibration oil, used for personal protection. It is also a sexual stimulant in the female. Added to any incense, it increases its powers. Mixed with powdered sandalwood, it makes an incense suitable for all religious or spiritual magic. Good for meditation, illumination, and so on.
  • Cinquefoil: Protective, strengthens the five senses. Also "five lucks"- love, money, health, power and wisdom, so is often used to anoint amulet and charm bags.
  • Citronella: Attracts friends and customers, protection from insects.
  • Clove: An aphrodisiac, worn to attract lovers. Inhaled, the oil helps memory and eyesight. Protects from hostile negative forces
  • Coriander: A love oil used to anoint candles.
  • Cumin Seed: Brings peace and harmony to the home. Anoint all doorways once a week just before sunrise when the household is asleep ad all is quiet.
  • Cyclamen: Worn to ease childbirth by the expectant mother. Also used in love and marriage spells.
  • Cypress: An oil of blessing, consecration and protection. It is a symbol of the Earth-element, as well as of death. When attending a funeral of a friend or loved one, wear this oil so that you will be uplifted by the meaning of death as the doorway to but another life. It also effectively screens out the negative vibrations of the mourners. Wear on Samhain to become aware and remember those who have passed on.
  • Eucalyptus: A healing oil, very useful in recuperation after long illnesses. Cures colds with daily application to the throat, forehead and wrists, and by adding it to healing baths. Also used for purifications. Promotes healing of depression
  • Frankincense: One of the most sacred of all oils, used to anoint magical tools, the altar, etc. A strong purifier used in exorcisms, purification rituals, and blessings. Frees one of obsessions and destructive habits, brings spiritual blessings
  • Gardenia: Wear to attract love. A powerful feminine magnetic oil. Protective.
  • Ginger: A tropical aphrodisiac. Induces passion.
  • Heliotrope: High spiritual vibrations, drenched with the energies of the Sun. Aids in clairvoyance assists meditation, protects from physical harm.
  • Honeysuckle: An oil of the mind, it promotes quick thinking and is often used as a memory aid by dabbing on the temples. Also used in prosperity rituals. Aids in understanding non-physical realities, sharpens intuition, brings prosperity
  • Hyacinth: Brings peace of mind to the mentally disturbed
  • Hyssop: Increases finances, and is added to the bath to create a purifying atmosphere. An excellent oil to wear during all types of magical rituals.
  • Jasmine: Symbol of the Moon, and of the mysteries of the night. Jasmine oil is used to attract love. The scent helps one relax, sleep, and also facilitates childbirth. It is sometimes used for meditation and general anointing purposes. This is a purely spiritual oil. Cleanses the aura, stimulates creativity and originality
  • Lavender: Used in healing and purifying rituals, and also to arouse sexual desire in men. Prostitutes wore it extensively to advertise their trade and to attract customers. Frees one from emotional stress, brings inner calm and peace, gives increased awareness, brings stability and permanence, good for headaches
  • Lemon: Evokes protective spirits.
  • Lemon Grass: An aid to the psychic powers. Wear on the forehead. Spiritualists and mediums use it, for it helps make contact with spirits.
  • Lilac: Induces Far Memory, the act of recalling past lives. It is also useful in inducing clairvoyant powers in general. Brings peace and harmony, draws good spirits, helps decision making, and improves memory.
  • Lotus: The sacred oil of the ancient Egyptians, lotus oil has a high spiritual vibration and is suitable for blessing, anointing, meditation, and as a dedicatory oil to your God(s). It is also used in healing rituals. One who wears lotus oil is sure of good fortune and much happiness.
  • Magnolia: An excellent oil for meditation and psychic development. It also brings peace and harmony.
  • Melilot: Fights depression, or what the old Witches used to call melancholy.
  • Mimosa: Used in healing rituals, and also in producing prophetic dreams. Anoint the forehead before retiring.
  • Mint: Used in prosperity spells, and to increase one’s business. Anoint wallets, etc.
  • Musk: The universally accepted "sex scent". It is also worn to purify and to gain courage. Instills self assurance, confidence and strength. It is a magnetic oil, worn with equal success by both sexes.
  • Myrrh: A purification, protection and hex-breaking oil. Possesses a high vibratory rate, making it excellent for the more religious rituals of magic. Anoint the house every morning and evening as part of any protection ritual. Guards against evil, brings peace, assists in understanding personal sorrow.
  • Narcissus: "Stupidfyer". This oil brings peace and harmony, soothes the nerves and relaxes the conscious mind. A "narcotic" type oil.
  • Neroli: Magnetic women’s oil. Rubbed between the breasts to attract men, or onto the temples to give peace.
  • Nutmeg: This oil is rubbed onto the temples and the third eye to help in meditation and to induce sleep. It is protective as well.
  • Orange: Brings harmony, raises power.
  • Orange Blossom: To make a person in the mood for marriage, wear this oil. many women add it to their daily baths to build up their attractiveness. Sometimes known as mantrap.
  • Orris Root: Attracts the opposite sex. Douse your clothes with the oil.
  • Patchouly: A very powerful occult oil, one of the magnetic oils to be worn by men. It attracts women. Also wards off negativity and evil, gives peace of mind, and is very sensual.
  • Peony: A lucky scent for all who need customers, success in business, or good fortune.
  • Peppermint: Used to create changes within one’s life. Also used to relax and allow one to unwind
  • Pine: Cleanses, ends useless recriminations.
  • Rose: The love oil. Unconditional love, peace, harmony, tranquility. Used in all love operations, added to baths, and to induce peace and harmony. Take a handful of rose buds, place them in a silver goblet. Pour one dram rose oil over them. Let soak for a week. After this, on a Friday night, burn them over the charcoal to infuse your house with loving vibrations. This is an excellent "peace" incense, and can be done regularly to ensure domestic tranquility.
  • Rose Geranium: Oil of protection. Anoint window sills, doors of house. Wear on self. Also imparts courage to the wearer. An excellent oil to use to bless a new home or apartment. A few drops on a charcoal block will release its powerful vibrations throughout the entire house. Also used to anoint censers.
  • Rosemary: A very vitalizing oil, rosemary is used in healing rituals and also to promote prudence, common sense, and self assurance. It aids mental powers when rubbed onto the temples. It is also protective and is used much like Rose Geranium. Rub onto the temples to ease pain of headache and in all healing rituals.
  • Rue: To break up negativity and curses, anoint a sprig of dried rue with this oil. Tie up in a red bag and carry for protection. Add nine drops of the oil to the bath every night for nine nights in succession during the waning moon to break a spell that has been cast against you. Salt may be added to the bath as well.
  • Saffron: Wear to aid in the development of clairvoyant powers.
  • Sage: Powerful clearing and cleansing, removes negative energy.
  • Sandalwood: Protective, very healing, this oil is used to anoint. It also aids one in seeing past incarnations. Try anointing the forehead to promote the Sight. calms the mind.
  • Sesame: Gives hope to one who is sick, discouraged or lonely.
  • Sweet Pea: One of the most beautiful of all scents, sweet pea oil is worn to attract strangers of all kinds, some of whom may become lovers or friends. Wear as a personal oil.
  • Spikenard: Wear during rituals to the ancient deities of Egypt, also to anoint sacred objects, such as altars, tools, etc.
  • Sweetgrass: Invokes spiritual blessings, aids transformation.
  • Tuberose: Mistress of the Night, as it is also known, is an excellent aphrodisiac. Promotes peace and also aids in psychic powers. Men wear it to attract women. Very much a physical oil.
  • Vanilla: A vitalizing oil, said to be sexually arousing in women. Use as an energy restorer. Sometimes used to gain extra power during magical ceremonies.
  • Vervain: Assists in obtaining material objects. It also stimulates creativity. Aids those who desire success in the performing and creative arts.
  • Violet: The oil is used in love operations and is sometimes sexually exciting. However, many people can’t stand the fragrance of the violet, for some curious reason. Once thought to be sacred to the Fairy Queen. Very healing, added to baths.
  • Wisteria: The door between the world of men and the realm of the Gods, the passport to higher consciousness and existence, and to bring illumination. Wear only when in complete serenity.
  • Ylang-Ylang: Makes its wearer irresistible to the opposite sex. Also soothes the problems of married life. Can help in finding a job. If worn to interviews you will be much calmer and more impressive to the interviewer. Sometimes called "Flower of Flowers."

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb – kinda – The Magick of Houseplants

February 17, 2010 at 10:41 am (Associations, Flowers, Garden, Herb, Home, Magic, Ostara, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

The Magick of Houseplants
by
Elizabeth Farrell

Garden Witchery is a wonderful way for Pagans of any belief to connect with the element of earth. All plants have their own special energies and magickal influences, but this article will focus primarily on houseplants. Because space can be limited for many Pagans and Witches, keeping houseplants or a small indoor garden in the home can offer various types of assistance in daily spiritual work.

Besides being naturally connected with the element of earth, the energy of each plant is also connected to its own individual element, is ruled by one of the planets and has either feminine or masculine energy. For example, Lavender is a masculine plant ruled by Mercury and its element is Air. These connections, or correspondences, are the backbone of ritual and spell work but they are also handy to know about when it comes to strengthening or softening the energy in your home.

Different types of plants need different care, so it’s a good idea to do a little research into the proper care of a plant when you purchase it. Also keep in mind that some plants are toxic in nature and should be kept well out of the reach of children and pets. For instance, English Ivy is highly toxic in nature and is best not kept in a house with young children. If you are in doubt about a plant’s toxicity, call your local plant nursery to ask for information.

The following is a list of common plants that you may wish to keep in your home, their magickal correspondences and energies.

Aloe:

  • Gender- feminine
  • Planet-Moon
  • Element-water

The sap of the Aloe Vera plant is well known for its ability to soothe minor burns and insect bites but this plant also has properties that are magick in nature. It helps to ward off negativity and is good to work with in protective/healing rituals and spells. Aloe is also said to be of assistance in preventing household accidents and its energy is especially useful in the kitchen area.

Crocus:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet- Venus
  • Element- water

Helps to nurture love and peaceful visions. When placed next to your bed it can help promote peaceful and creative dreams.

Cacti:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet-Mars
  • Element- fire

All Cacti are protective in nature and can absorb negativity. They also help to protect against intrusions of any kind and burglaries.

Cyclamen:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Venus
  • Element-water

Cyclamen is good for use in love and fertility spells and helps to promote passion.

Fern:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet- Mercury
  • Element-air

Keeping potted ferns in your home or on your patio helps to encourage protection and health. The fern is a favorite of fairies and carrying or wearing a sprig of a fern frond is said to aid in finding treasure.

Ivy:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Saturn
  • Element-water

Ivy, in all its varieties, is a plant that brings protection, fertility and faithfulness. A sacred plant in Wicca, it is often associated with the Holly tree.

Orchid:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Venus
  • Element-water

Romantic in nature, the orchid is often used for love charms and spells. It can also help to enhance psychic powers and creative visions.

Venus Flytrap:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet- Mars
  • Element-fire

The Venus Flytrap is a good love attractant and can also be kept in the home for protection.

Lily:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Moon
  • Element-water

Protective in nature, the lily promotes happiness, love, harmony and peace. Can be very toxic so be sure to keep all lily plants away from children and pets.

Use your own intuition when it comes to finding the right plants for your home and how to arrange them. Also, by communicating with the plants you currently have in your home, you can find the kind of magick and energy that your plants have to offer you.

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb is This – Wild Thyme

February 10, 2010 at 10:30 am (Cleansing, Colds, Fertility, Folklore, Herb, Magic, Ostara, pagan, prosperity, Protection, Psychic, Wild Thyme, Witch)

Wild Thyme

Latin name: Thymus vulgaris
Origin: Morocco
Associations: Venus, Feminine, Water
Powers: Healing, Health, Sleep, Love, Psychic Powers & Purification
Element: Air
Main magical uses: clairvoyance, cleansing, consecration, courage, divination, dreams, exorcism, faeries, happiness, healing, love, money, prevents nightmares, protection, psychic development, purification
Other magical uses: compassion, confidence, contacting other planes, grieving, magic, meditation, Midsummer, passion, release, renewal, rituals for the dead, Summer rituals, wishing
Lore: Thyme has strong ties to faery lore. Paul Beyerl pairs it with pearls.

The name Thyme, in its Greek form, was first given to the plant by the Greeks as a derivative of a word which meant ‘to fumigate,’ either because they used it as incense, for its balsamic odor, or because it was taken as a type of sweet-smelling herb. Others derive the name from the Greek word thumus, signifying courage, the plant being held in ancient and mediaeval days to be a great source of invigoration, its cordial qualities inspiring courage. Lady Northcote (in The Herb Garden this link will take you to what I THINK is the book referenced…) says that among the Greeks, Thyme denoted graceful elegance; ‘to smell of Thyme’ was an expression of praise, applied to those whose style was admirable. It was an emblem of activity, bravery and energy, and in the days of chivalry it was the custom for ladies to embroider a bee hovering over a sprig of Thyme on the scarves they presented to their knights. In the south of France, Wild Thyme is a symbol of extreme Republicanism, tufts of it being sent with the summons to a Republican meeting.

Magickal Uses: Thyme is burned to attract good health and is also worn for this purpose. It is also used in healing spells. Placed beneath the pillow, Thyme ensures restful sleep and a pleasant lack of nightmares. Worn, Thyme aids in developing psychic powers, and women who wear a sprig of Thyme in their hair make themselves irresistible. Thyme is also a purifactory herb; the Greeks burned it in their temples to purify them and so Thyme is often burned prior to magical rituals to cleanse the area. In spring a magical cleansing bath composed of marjoram and Thyme is taken to ensure all the sorrows and ills of the past are removed from the person. Thyme can also be carried and smelled to give courage and energy.

Thyme is associated with fairies and wearing a sprig of Wild Thyme, or essential oil of Thyme, is said to help one to see fairies. To see the fey, pick flowers from a patch of Wild Thyme where the little folk live and place the flowers on your eyes. If you place sprigs of Thyme on your closed eyes and sleep upon a fairy mound, this will also supposedly guarantee your seeing fairies. Dried, powdered Thyme, sprinkled on doorsteps and windowsills, is an invitation to the fae into your home. Wild Thyme, gathered from the side of a fairy mound, is especially potent for use in fairy magic.

Thyme incense or herb is appropriate for burning in love spells. Thyme is believed to be lucky in two different ways, for protection and cleansing and to bring about an increase in money. We are told that when using thyme as a protective curio to stop nightmares, folks burn it on charcoal and breathe the smoke, but the best known use of thyme is in money drawing spells. Thyme is an ingredient in Three Jacks and King Oil, used by Gamblers to draw money-luck. Some people plant thyme in their gardens, saying that as it grows, their money will increase. Others take a dollar bill, fold it around thyme leaves fold it again to make a packet, tie it up with green thread, and bury the packet in the middle of a Crossroads on the night of the Full Moon. Add it to the magical-cleansing bath of springtime, along with marjoram, to remove all sorrows and ills of winter. Add a thyme infusion to the bath regularly to ensure a constant flow of money.

When worn it will help psychic powers develop, and if worn be a woman in her hair, it will make her irresistible. Thyme can be a valuable incense to protect against dangerous creatures, insects and reptiles. Thyme carries with it the magic of light and is an excellent choice for those who take themselves too seriously. Practitioners can work with Thyme to increase their courage, giving them the power to meet that which confronts them. It can also be used to keep a light heart when working hard to achieve one’s goals. Gather Thyme with marigolds, marjoram and wormwood for love divination on Saint Luke’s Day. Attracts loyalty, affection, and the good opinion of others. Wear a sprig to ward off unbearable grief or provide strength and courage when needed. Burn or hang in the home for banishing, purification, and to attract good health for all occupants. Use in cleansing baths prior to working candle magic. Use in dream pillows to ward off nightmares and ensure restful sleep.  Place in a jar and keep in the home or at work for good luck. A place where wild thyme grows will be a particularly powerful energy center on earth.

When attending a funeral, wear a sprig of thyme to repel the negativity of the mourners. It is worn or added to the ritual cup to aid in communicating with the deceased. (It also helps one see Otherworldly entities.) Essence of Thyme is used for cosmetics and rice powder. It is also used for embalming corpses. Wild Thyme collected on Midsummer Day in Bohemia was used to fumigate trees on Solstice as a fertility charm, to make them grow well. Burn Thyme and the other eight sacred Midsummer herbs (betony wood (or basil), chamomile, fennel (or lavender), lemon balm (or dianthus), mullein, rue, St. John’s wort, and Vervain) in the midsummer fire or in a cauldron on your altar to have your Litha spells have extra punch. When you add the Thyme, be sure to say:

"I give Thyme to the fires of rebirth for activity and energy"

The antiseptic properties of Thyme were fully recognized in classic times, there being a reference in Virgil’s Georgics to its use as a fumigator, and Pliny tells us that, when burnt, it puts to flight all venomous creatures. In modern times, thyme is used for sore throat and diarrhea. It is also used to stimulate the appetite. and help soothe stomach and intestinal ailments . Thyme tea will arrest gastric fermentation. It is useful in cases of wind spasms and colic, and will assist in promoting perspiration at the commencement of a cold, and in fever and febrile complaints generally.

The dried flowers have been often used in the same way as lavender, to preserve linen from insects.

Sources:

Windspirit’s Wanderings
Lady Hawke
Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magickal Herbs

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This – Basil

January 20, 2010 at 10:36 am (Associations, Basil, Brid, Bride, Brighid, Brigit, Herb, Herbs, Imbolc, Magic, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

Basil has been called "the Witches Herb" for centuries. Basil has been used for exorcism, protection, in "flying ointments", and love potions. "Where Basil grows, no evil goes!" and "Where Basil is, no evil lives," goes the old adages. Basil, given as a gift, will bring good luck to a new home. Sprinkled around the house, it wards off evil. Soak it in water for three days and sprinkle the water at your doorstep to bring money and success, drive away evil, and have a happy family. add this to the water for scrubbing and cleansing the floors and walls. AFTER moving in, and regularly dried Basil should be sprinkled on the kitchen floor and swept out the door. If possible a basil plant should be planted near the home (or inside in a pot) to bring protection and good fortune to everyone who lives inside. If you have a job interview coming up, you can sprinkle this outside of the building where you hope to be employed (careful though if someone sees you it won’t help your job prospects very much!).

To increase love in the home, use it in cooking or keep some in an open bowl in the kitchen and replace it each week. Mixed in a bath with love herbs (such as red clover, rose buds, catnip, gentian, damania, lavendar, cubebs, and juniper berries ), it increases affection in the family. Basil also protects from evil. Mix with rosemary and rue for a cleansing and protective bath. Pour the water into your bathwater, and rest in the water for 20 minutes allowing the essence of the herb to coat you to provide protection from negative energy.

Imbolc is the traditional time of year for initiations and the initiate should have been taking daily tonics of basil for at least the last two weeks. It is given now to prepare the innerself for initiation to bring fortitude. In situations where you feel you will need protection, steep a teaspoon of fresh basil in one cup of boiling water. Let the basil steep for 5-10 minutes, than strain the herbs from the water. 

Basil oil rubbed on a green candle before burning will attract wealth. The incense smoke is beneficial for the same, as well as for banishing, exorcising and  protection.

 

Oil of basil helps fight colds, coughs, cramps, fever, anxiety, and much more. Basil is a stimulating and antidepressant oil which relieve can mental fatigue, clear the mind, and improve concentration. It is an expectorant and antiseptic, used for all types of chest infections. It’s also good for congested sinuses, chronic colds, head colds and whooping cough. The antispasmodic and carminative properties of basil help to relieve abdominal pains, indigestion, and vomiting. It works well on tired muscles, especially in massage oil used after hard physical work or strenuous exercise, it also eases arthritis and gout. It is reputed to be one of the best nerve tonics among all essential oils. Forget the Prozac, Basil can be used for the relief of depression – but over use will cause depression. Avoid if pregnant. Good for respiration conditions, such as Asthma and Bronchitis. As it has an effect upon Adrenal Cortex it can be effective with allergies. Sweet Basil is great for aiding concentration and sharpening the senses.

 

Basil has been known and grown since ancient times. Back in the first century AD, the Greek physician Dioscorides believed basil dulled the sight and produced "wind." According to Gerard in his Herbal published in England in the 1600s, the smell of basil was "good for the heart and for the head." Gerard also advised that the juice of the plant was good against headaches, if it were drunk with wine, and was useful in clearing up diseases of the eye. In Italy, a pot of basil on your balcony means you are ready to receive suitors. In India, the herb is dedicated to Vishnu and is given to the dead to help ensure their entrance to the afterlife. Prostitutes used to wear it in Spain to attract business. believed to have derived its name form the Basilisk, the fabulous dragon-like creature that was deadly to anyone who looked at it. This may have spawned the old belief that Basil begot scorpions. Some claimed it bred scorpions and that scorpions would be found beneath a pot where basil grew—a belief that arose, perhaps, from the prevalence of scorpions in some of the tropical regions of Asia and Africa, where basil originated, and their predilection for warm, dark places. Gerard wrote that those who were stung by a scorpion would feel no pain if they had eaten basil. Culpepper, a contemporary of Gerard, suggested in his Herbal that basil would draw out the poison of venomous beasts, wasps or hornets. Basil made its way to Europe by the Middle Ages and to England and America in the mid-17th century, where it was used mainly medicinally. It was not until the 19th century that basil became the ever-present component of herb gardens that it is today. Basil is also very important in Asia and Asian cuisines. The range of basils available is the result of the variability of the species, basilicum. The species contains a natural diversity of fragrances and colors; plant breeders have selected for and improved on these different traits.

Growing From Seed
Whether you sow seeds indoors or out, remember that basil does not like cold
or even cool, weather. Sow the seeds outdoors when day and night temps reach about 55 to 60 degrees. When sown or transplanted at the right time, basil is one of the easiest herbs to grow successfully.

Starting Basil Indoors
Plan to sow seeds 4 to 6 weeks before the date of your average last frost in
spring. Basils do not need a long time to grow large enough to transplant to the garden.

  • Fill a shallow container, or flat, or individual 2- to 21/4-inch pots with
    a commercial seed-starting mix. Moisten the mix and let it drain.
  • Sow the seeds in rows in a flat or two to three seeds per pot. Cover the
    seeds with about 1/4 inch of the mix. Press the mix down lightly and spritz
    the surface with water to moisten it and settle the seeds.
  • To keep the mix from drying out while the seeds are germinating, cover the
    containers with sheets of clear plastic wrap, or place each in a plastic bag
    and close it with a twist-tie.
  • Set the containers in a warm location; the growing medium should be at
    about 70-75 degrees F (21-23 degrees C). Seedlings will emerge in 4 to 7 days. When they do, remove the plastic covering and place the containers in bright light or direct sun in a south-facing window or a fluorescent light
    garden. Give the containers a quarter turn every few days so the plants grow straight instead of leaning towards the light source.
  • Keep the mix evenly moist by watering from the bottom: Set the containers
    in a sink filled with a couple of inches of water until beads of moisture
    appear on the surface. A liquid fertilizer at one half the recommended rate
    can be given to seedlings to promote healthy plants.
  • When the seedlings are about 2 inches tall and have at least two pairs of
    true leaves, transplant those in flats to individual pots. Thin those
    started in small pots to one per pot by snipping off all but the strongest
    looking one with a scissors. It is not necessary to transplant purple-leaved
    basils, such as `Dark Opal’ and `Purple Ruffles’, if you sow them about
    1/2-1 inch apart.
  • If young plants become tall and spindly, the growing tip can be pinched to
    encourage branching and compact growth. Some of the smaller basils, such as `Spicy Globe’, have a naturally branching habit and do not need to be
    pinched.

Sowing Directly in the Garden.
Sow seeds in the garden when the soil has warmed up to about 55 to 60 degrees day and night temperatures. Sow the seeds about 1/2 inch deep in good garden soil; if you cover the seeds with less soil, they may float to the surface after a heavy rain. Basil germinates readily, therefore you do not need to sow thickly. You can sow the seeds in rows or in groups; drop two to three seeds in each hole for the latter. Keep the seedbed moist until germination occurs. When the seedlings have at least two pairs of true leaves and are 2 to 3 inches tall, thin them to stand 10 to 30 inches apart, depending on the species or cultivar. Begin pinching out the growing tips for compact growth when the seedlings are 3 to 4 inches tall.  To have an uninterrupted supply of fresh basil, most gardeners sow basil seed several times during the growing season. The National Garden Bureau recommends sowing basil seed every 3 to 4 weeks to harvest fresh leaves for culinary uses.

Garden Uses
Basil is as ornamental as it is edible. Put it in a traditional herb garden, in the vegetable plot in the center of a bed of red- and green-leaf lettuces or edging a bed of tomatoes. Use both the green- and purple-leaved varieties in borders; the latter are especially beautiful with perennials such as coral bells (Heuchera `Palace Purple’), Sedum `Vera Jameson’, fountain grass (Pennisetum), dusty miller, and blue Salvia farinacea. Both combine well with annuals, such as dwarf or medium-height snapdragons, nicotiana, French marigolds, and petunias.

With its natural round shape, the dwarf basil `Spicy Globe’ makes a wonderful edging for any type of garden: perennial, rose, or herb. Try the old-fashioned technique of keeping flies away by planting basils around a patio or in containers on a deck.

Taking Care of Basil
Like most herbs, basils do not require much maintenance. In sandy or infertile soil, fertilize basil plants for continuous growth. If you amended the soil with organic matter, you may not need to fertilize basil. Basil plants need about an inch of water a week. Water, if rain does not provide for the plant’s needs.
Although the flower spikes are attractive, it is recommended to cut them off
as they deplete the plants’ energy resulting in fewer leaves. The leaves have the best flavor—the most essential oils—when they are harvested before the plants flower. Cut whole stems rather than individual leaves, especially if you want to use the leaves as a garnish because they bruise easily. Cutting whole stems is a tasty way of creating a bushy, compact plant: Cut just above a pair of lower leaves; the plant will produce new shoots at that point.

Growing in Containers
Basils are excellent herbs to grow in containers because they add such attractive colors and textures to the plantings. They look good in pots or
window boxes in full sun. A container of basil by the back door or on a deck
provides easy access for harvesting! The container should have drainage holes in the bottom or sides. Fill it with a soilless mix, which is more lightweight than garden soil and is also free of diseases and weed seeds. It is easy to provide nutrients all season by incorporating a controlled-release fertilizer in the mix before planting. With mixed plantings, place most basils near the center of containers or at the ends of window boxes. Use dwarf basils to edge a container planting or on their own in smaller, 8-inch pots, and place the pots around a larger planter, marching up steps, or along a walk. Basils combine well with other herbs and with annuals.

Plant basils at the same level as, or just slightly deeper than, they were growing in their original pots. Water the container well after planting. Keep the plants evenly moist through the growing season; the roots of any plants in a container cannot reach down or out in search of available moisture. Smaller containers will require more frequent watering than large ones. If you plant in a window box, remember that overhanging eaves may prevent rain from reaching the plants. Because it can overwinter in the soil, don’t plant basil in the same location every year. Avoid excessive watering and provide proper drainage  

From Garden to Kitchen 
One of the most useful herbs – a key ingredient for many Italian and Indian
dishes and great when fresh in salads. The ‘fresh-from-the-garden’ taste is
far tastier than the dried variety.
Basil complements many kinds of dishes and combines well with other herbs, whether used fresh or dried. The flavor and appearance of the leaves are best fresh. Many gardeners are unable to eat their fresh, homegrown tomatoes without fresh basil and a dash of premium olive oil. Freshly harvested basil leaves added to mesclun or lettuce salads liven up the flavors. Pesto is another favorite use for basil. Create the classic pesto sauce, a combination of basil, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts, and freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

Whip up basil butter. Cream together one stick of unsalted butter and 1-3
tablespoons of dried, crushed basil or 2-6 tablespoons of fresh, minced basil. Place in a covered container or roll into a cylinder-shape and refrigerate for at least an hour before using.

Make basil vinegar to use in salad dressings. Heat vinegar (any type) in an enamel pan; pour it into a bottle and add several sprigs of basil. Let set for 2 weeks before using.

If you have any basil left at the end of the growing season consider drying the leaves. To dry basil, cut the entire plant and hang on a string in a well ventilated room. When dry, just pluck the leaves from the stems and store in airtight jars out of direct light.

Windowsill Plants
It is easy to bring container-grown plants inside, but you can also pot up a few plants from the garden. Cut them back rather severely—to about 3-4 inches tall—so they will put out new growth when they become acclimated to the indoor environment. Grow them on the sunniest windowsill you have, preferably with a southern exposure, or put them in a light-garden. Keep the soil evenly moist and fertilize them once a month.
Because basils are so easy to grow from seed, however, the National Garden
Bureau recommends it is just as simple to sow fresh seed indoors at the end
of the outdoor growing season. Pot the seedlings into individual 4- to 6-inch containers and enjoy fresh basil all winter harvested from your windowsill.

Special thanks to Eleanore Lewis as the author of one of the source articles
Sources: National Garden Bureau
Herb-Magic

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This (kinda…) – Planting Magical Gardens

January 13, 2010 at 11:06 am (Associations, Decoration, Dragon, Dragons, Garden, Herb, Herbs, Magic, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

Planting Magical Gardens
From
Magical Gardens : Myth, Mulch & Marigolds
By Patricia Monaghan

Tender shoots, sleeping seeds,
Gentle Devas,
Watch over this garden,
Make it fertile, make it green,
Make it bloom.

All gardens are magical-and all gardeners are magicians. With the wizardry of earth and seed, the gardener transforms the world into a place of beauty, power, and healing. This year, acknowledge the connection between gardening and magic deliberately by creating a sacred space dedicated to your craft. Perhaps it will be a small space filled with significant plants and symbols-one to admire from your window-or it might be a larger space, big enough for meditations, invocations, and general witching work. Your garden might be dedicated to a deva or divinity; it might recall an ancient ritual or myth in its selection and placement of plants. Your dreams and traditions will tell you how to build your own Witches’ garden. Here are a few ideas to inspire you.

A Witches’ Pentacle Garden

The pentacle, the witch’s symbol, makes a simple shape for a garden of mixed perennial and annual flowers. To construct such a garden, find a sunny spot of any size and dig out a circular bed. Within it, "draw" a pentacle by stringing twine among five posts, set equally distant around the circle. This will create a central pentagon. Fill it with plants whose names express your craft: "Diana"; the "daylillies" named "Merry Witch" and "Wicked Witch", "Witch’s Thimble" and "Moon Witch"; and "Magic Lilies", whose flowers bolt surprisingly directly from the ground, to bloom with extravagant fragrance.

Plant the arms of your starry pentacle with light-green chamomile around a filling of darker-green mint; then place round clumps of Dianthus "Essex Witch" at each point of the star. Surround this whole design with a circle of green parsley, and densely plant dainty sweet alyssum as the pentacle’s background. Your pentacle is now ready to shine back at the night’s stars-and at you.

A Two-Headed Flower Dragon

Dragons in the garden? Why not? As symbols of the element of water, dragons should be welcome among your flowers. Try constructing a garden in the shape of a two-headed dragon, called an amphisbaena. Use a hose to outline a circle. Making a opening in the circle, create an inner circle offset from the first, forming snaky "dragon heads" at the entry. Then build a scaly back at the thickest part of the circle, with two trellises planted with "Magic Dragon" roses and separated by several feet. Opposite, make eyes with dwarf Japanese holly called "Green Dragon"; surround them with the ground-covering liriope called "Silver Dragon", which will form a soft hair to offset the dragon’s eyes.

A band of perennial creeper "Dragon’s Blood" sedum forms the belly of your dragon. Behind it and before the trellises, establish drifts of "False Dragonhead". Finally, on the outer edges of the garden, plant the scaly surge called "Jade Dragon". Between the trellises, place a bench, then add porcelain pots with dragon designs at its sides. Your garden will never thirst with such a protector guarding it.

Central Africa was terrorized by the mokelembembe, Ethiopia by the dragon of Silene, Italy by the tatzelworm, France by the peluda and tarasque. In Scandinavia, Fafnir struck fear into hearts while England was terrorized by the Mordiford wyvern and the Lambton worm. Dragons and dragon deities are found in the mythology of every continent, from Australia (where the bunyip reigns) to subarctic Canada (where we find tales of dragon-whales). Sea lizard, dragonet, basilisk, amphipter, pyrali, sirrush – these are some of the names given to this fierce and often fearsome figure. Its form is almost as variable as its name, for it appears winged and wingless, serpentine and footed, with a huge tail or none at all. Whatever its form, however, the dragon is acknowledged the world over. The culture to which the dragon has been most symbolically important is that of China, where ancient emperors reserved to themselves the right to display the image of the riveted dragon, while their attendants could claim only the forted.

Ancient China saw the dragon as a complex creature with the head of a camel, eyes of a demon, horns of a stag, a cow’s ears, a snake’s neck and a clam’s belly. Its feet were those of tigers, its claws those of eagles, and its 117 scales are those of a fish – 81 of them beneficial, 36 malignant. A creature of earth, water, sky, the dragon’s special role was as intermediary between and among these parts of the cosmos. A Chinese dragon lived an incredibly long time. Perhaps 3,000 years passed from the time one hatched from its multicolored egg to its impressive maturity. The dragon passed through many stages, living as a water snake when young, then growing a carp’s head and becoming a fish for almost a thousand years. It took another 500 years to grow the stag’s horns on its head. Lastly, its branching wings thrust out – taking more than a thousand years to do so. Once Mature, a dragon could take on one of many possible tasks. The ti-lung protected streams and rivers. The fu-ts’ang lung guarded treasure. The yu lung helped mortals pass examinations. A few were given especially important tasks, such as that of the Yellow Dragon of the River Lo, which unveiled the trigrams of the I Ching to humankind.

In Europe, the dragon appears as a powerful creature with whom combat is the ultimate test for a hero. While some claim the dragon is a symbol of evil, less dualistic thinkers have interpreted the dragon’s mythic role as that of ‘guardian at the gates’, protecting spiritual secrets from those not strong enough, or not yet ready, to understand them. Thus St. George, slaying the dragon, becomes an image of a hero conquering his own weaknesses and fears in order to enter a greater spiritual initiation, rather than an emblem of right’s might.

Why a dragon garden? Why invite this fierce being to your doorstep? There are two reasons to consider adding dragon energy to your garden. Firstly is the dragon’s connection with the forces of underground power, especially underground water. Secondly is the dragon nature of gardening itself, for in encountering the willful ways of our gardens, we encounter the lessons our spirit needs to learn. Every gardener is, to some extent, St. George slaying the demons of pride and grandiosity, of carelessness and excessive control. A dragon garden thus makes visible the soul’s struggle with itself that is the essence of conscious gardening. In welcoming the dragon into our gardens, we honor the generations of gardeners who have struggled with the energies of the earth and learned from that struggle.

A Spiral of Trees

It is especially appropriate to center a dragon garden on trees, for these long-lived woody plants have symbolic meanings similar to the dragon itself; the tree, like the dragon, is a being of many levels. Its hidden roots are deep underground and its trunk points upward into the sky. Like the dragon, the tree partakes of the three levels; below, middle earth and above. Spiraling in to its central tree, a stunning dragon’s eye pine, this garden grove should be placed in a sunny, open part of your property. As the shrubs and trees mature, they will provide substantial shade as well as a secret meditation spot where you can encounter your own dragon energy.

You will need a space that is between forty and fifty feet in diameter to make both trees and gardener happy. Place this garden where you wish to eliminate an unattractive view, where you wish to provide more privacy, or where you want a deeply shaded retreat for oppressively hot days. Note that this, unlike most of the gardens in this book, requires a warm climate, most of the trees are not hardy beyond zone six. The tree that forms the center of this spiral-pathed garden grows to a significant height, perhaps sixty feet within twenty years. The trees and shrubs that spiral out from it diminish in height to small shrubs at the garden path’s entry. Thus, as you follow the short path into the garden, you have a sense of entering a forest of increasing depth and mystery. At the spiral’s center, place a bench or several rustic chairs to encourage meditation and conversation. Although this garden will take a decade for its unique character to emerge, it will become a favorite haunt for residents and visitors as it grows into its full majesty.

The garden is shaped in a spiral, a reference both to the spiraling kundalini energy of the dragon and to the shape these mythic creatures often assume in Asian art, their tails stretching out from their circled bodies. The garden’s central tree is the unusual dragon’s-eye pine, named for its long needles banded with red and green rings. Next to it are two tall, bluish columns of Chinese Dragon spruce with unusual purplish gray bark. Spiraling beyond are three pyramidal Black Dragon Japanese cedars, whose bright green growing tips dot the dark older foliage. Next, comes three evergreen Japanese holly of the variety called Black Dragon; these mounding shrubs bear dark green clustered leaves on intricately twisting branches. Three Dragon azaleas will grow to five feet tall, bearing masses of brilliant red flowers in mid spring; their dense evergreen foliage provides privacy at the opening to the garden. Finally, two tiny Green Dragon Japanese holly form the dragon’s tail.

Around this tree spiral, plan drifts of three plants: Dragon Claw and Marbled Dragon ivy, the first with waxy deep cut leaves, the second with white veined multi-toned leaves; and Silver Dragon liriope, a magnificent variegated lily-turf groundcover whose spikes of lavender flowers will brighten the path in late summer. Draw the groundcovers out at least two feet beyond the last holly bush, bringing the dragon’s tail to as sharp a point as possible. Once the plantings are in, pave the path with cedar chips or other natural material. A stone or paved path is inappropriate to the feeling of a forest glade that you are striving to create. As the pines and spruce mature, they will add their litter to the pathways, creating a more natural ambiance.

The Artemisia Glade

The common garden plant artemisia is said to have so delighted the wildwood goddess Artemis that she named it after herself. In her honor, establish a little glade of her favorite flower. Find a narrow area with good Sun, then fill it with drifts of the silver-leafed plants. Given Artemis’ penchant for wilderness, be sure to avoid regimented rows! Begin by establishing focal points with tall "Artemisia lactiflora" (white mugwort). Then add sculptural accents with fragrant "Artemisia California montara" (California sagebrush), a gracefully cascading mounding shrub that will grow to two feet tall. Opposite, place "Artemis fiffolia", a small native shrub with airy, feathery foliage. Finally, fill in the remaining sections near the pathways with Artemisias "Silver Mound" and "Canescens", both smallish perennials which, once established, create attractive mounds of silvery gray, feathery foliage.

Artemisias, once established, thrive and expand. You may find gardener friends with older Artemisia beds which they are willing to divide. You might substitute some of the above suggestions with gift plants of similar heights and shapes. You can’t really mismatch Artemisias; the family demands similar culture and location, and the varieties of related foliage will be invariably pleasing.

Other Ideas

There are endless ideas for gardens based in myth and magic. Try a red garden for Mars, or a white one for the Moon. Build a zodiac garden with herbs for each planet. Divide the yard according to the wheel of the year, and create plantings for each festival. Place sculptures and symbols among the plants. Your garden is a magical place already. Let yourself make it even more so!

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This – Marigold

September 2, 2009 at 10:49 am (Associations, Autum Equinox, Herb, Mabon, Magic, pagan, Wednesday, Witch)

Marigold

Latin name: Calendula officinalis
Common names: Calendula, Husband’s Dial, Holigold, Marybud, Caltha
officinalis, Golds, Ruddes, Mary Gowles, Oculus Christi, Pot Marigold,
Marygold, Fiore d’ogni mese, Solis Sponsa.
Parts Used: Flowers, herb, leaves.
Herbal uses: Marigold is chiefly used as a local remedy. It is useful in the
treatment of chronic ulcer, varicose veins, and jaundice. A Marigold flower,
rubbed on the affected part, is a remedy for the pain and swelling caused by
the sting of a wasp or bee. A lotion made from the flowers can be used for
sprains and wounds. The leaves can eaten as a salad and a yellow dye has
also been extracted from the flower, by boiling.
Associations: Marigold is associated with the sun and the element of fire.
Magickal uses: Magical attributes include prophesy, legal matters, the
psychic, seeing magical creatures, love, clairvoyance, dreams, business or
legal affairs and renewing personal energy. Be sure to gather your Marigolds
for magickal workings at noon. A fresh Marigold flower can be worn to court
for a favorable outcome of a trial. If you place Marigold in your mattress,
you will have prophetic dreams… and if you place it under your mattress it
will make whatever you dream come true. Since the Marigold embodies the sun,
it can make a person more attractive and confident. Add Marigold to your
bath water to make this happen. A vase of fresh and bright Marigolds in a
room brings a renewed surge of life to those in the room!

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Herbal Prosperity Spell

August 20, 2009 at 10:04 am (Herb, Incense, Mabon, Magic, Oils, pagan, prosperity, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Herbal Prosperity Spell
From The Dust Gully

Cast a magic Circle or get into a magic space. Bring with you the following:

  • Mabon oil*
  • 1 gold or yellow candle
  • 1 black candle
  • 2 tbs. Each:
    • yarrow
    • rosemary
    • marigold
  • 1 clear quartz crystal
  • 1 citrine
  • 1 thurible
  • Mabon incense**
  • 1 instant light charcoal
  • 1 – 4 inch square of paper
  • 1 – 4 inch square of yelllow fabric, or magic bag
  • gold or yellow cord

In a circle, anoint the candles with the Mabon oil. Hold the gold candle and charge it with words to bring prosperity. So mote it be. Charge the black candle to draw you all that is safe, correct, and granted by the Gods and Goddesses.
Place the candles in the holders and as you light them say:

This flame is the light of the God Mabon and the Mother Goddess Modron.

Light the charcoal. Put a pinch of Prosperity Incense*** on it.  Take the paper and write your spell, what ever it may be, what ever you may want. Repeat this out loud, speaking to Mabon and Modron. Thank them for the bounty they have given you in the past. Think of the Wheel of the Year that has come before, and be truly thankful for all you have been granted. Smudge the spell in the smoke of the incense by passing the paper through the rising smoke. Roll the spell and tie with some yellow thread or cord and set it aside. Place the fabric square or magic bag in front of you with some gold cord to tie it. Pick up your dried herbs and stone one by one. Hold them in your hands. Lift your hands and show them to the God and Goddess. Visualize the light of the God and Goddess striking the object. Place the herbs and stone in the bag, tie , and set aside. Snuff out your candles or let them burn. You may want to relight them at a time when you want to again cast the spell. Carry the spell and magic bag with you.

*Mabon Oil

  • hazelnut oil
  • almond oil
  • pinch marigold leaves
  • walnut shells, usually crushed or in pieces
  • pinch oak leaves
  • 1 acorn
  • 1 stone ruled by the sun (yellow topaz, citrine, cat’s eye, amber)

**Mabon Incense

  • 3 tbs. each
  • marigold
  • dried oak leaves
  • fern
  • passionflower
  • frankincense and myrrh
  • dried apple
  • yarrow
  • rosemary
  • bittersweet
  • wheat

Add:

  • 1 dram mabon oil
  • 1 tsp. of shiny gold glitter or piece of gold jewelry.

Mix well. Place in bowl or burn.

***Prosperity Incense

  • 1 part Frankincense
  • 1/2 part Cinnamon
  • 1/4 part Nutmeg
  • 1/2 part Balm

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This – Rose

August 19, 2009 at 10:45 am (Associations, Autum Equinox, Colors, Herb, Mabon, Magic, pagan, Rose, Wednesday, Witch)

ROSE

Latin name: Rosaceae
Common names: A Rose by any other name would still be a Rose.
Some General Rose Information: More than 10,000 kinds of Roses are known to
be in cultivation but only three types of ‘Rose’ odors are recognized (those of the Cabbage Rose, the Damask Rose and the Tea Rose ). However because of how many hybrid rose types there are, every gradation of odor is possible.
Parts used: flowers, hips.
Herbal uses: Rose petals are known for their mild astringency and tonic value, but they are today mostly used to impart their scent to other pharmaceutical preparations. When Rose petals are used as a medicine they are used to treat stomatitis and pharyngitis. Honey of Roses can be made from clarified honey and fluid extract of Roses and is popular for treating sore throats and ulcerated mouths. Rose Vinegar, prepared by steeping dried Rose petals in distilled vinegar, can be used to treat headaches. Two French liqueurs also have Rose petals as one of the chief ingredients. Ointment of Rose-water, commonly known as Cold Cream, is used as a soothing, cooling application for chapped hands or face and minor skin abrasions. Rosehips are a good source of vitamin C and a tea can be made of them which is good for treating colds and flu.
Associations: Rose is associated with the element of water and with Venus,
and is known as a ‘Goddess Herb’.
The Deities that Rose are associated with are: Venus, Hulda, Demeter, Isis, Eros, Cupid, and Adonis.
Magical uses: Rose is known as *the* herb of love. Add Rose bud petals to
bath water to conjure up a lover. Put red Rose petals in a red velvet bag and pin this under your clothes to attract love – or you can wear Rosehips as beads to bring love to you. Rose oil and Rose incense are both used in love spells. If you wash your hands with Rose water before mixing love potions, the potions will be stronger. Rose is also good when used in healing rituals and spells. Burn Rose Petals in your bedroom before going to sleep and this will guarantee you a good nights sleep. Roses are loved by the fey so you can plant Roses in your garden to attract fairies. Wild Roses are best for this purpose and you need to say the following spell as you plant your baby Rose bush:

"I ask a fairy from the wild,
To come and tend this wee rose-child.
A babe of air she thrives today,
Root her soul in the Goddesses’ good clay.
Fairies make this twig your bower,
By your magic shall time see her flower!"

Different color Roses have different meanings so you can use Roses to give
someone a message magically. These are what the different Rose colors mean:

  • Red – I love you
  • White – I love you not
  • Yellow – I love another
  • Moss – I admire you from afar
  • Pink – My love for you is innocent
  • Orange – I love you vigorously
  • Amethyst – I will love you forever
  • Wild – I love you because you are fair and innocent

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb is This – Thistle

August 5, 2009 at 10:04 am (Ancestors, Associations, Folklore, Herb, History, Lore, Mabon, Magic, pagan, Wednesday, Witch)

Thistle

There are many different varieties of Thistle so these are a few of the best
known ones…
Latin names:

  • Holy Thistle – Carbenia benedicta
  • Milk Thistle – Silybum Marianum

Common names:

  • Holy Thistle – Blessed Thistle;
  • Milk Thistle – Marian Thistle, Our Lady’s Thistle

Part used:

  • Holy Thistle – herb;
  • Milk Thistle – Whole herb, root, leaves, seeds and hull.

Herbal uses: The Holy Thistle can be used as a liver tonic and also is useful in migraine headache relief. It can be made into a salve for canker sores and warts. The Milk Thistle is also a liver tonic but is also useful in helping cure depression. It is used in Germany for curing jaundice. The decoction when applied externally is said to have proved beneficial in cases of cancer. Thistle was also said to cure "bitings of mad dogs and venomous beasts."

Associations: Thistles are associated with the planet of Mars and with the
element of fire. Milk Thistle is associated with the Virgin Mary (Milk Thistle gets its name from the white veins in its leaves. Legend has it that one day Mary stopped to feed the Holy Child, and was so tired from her long ride that she fell asleep. The babe was also soon slumbering, and some drops of milk escaped from Her Breast, and fell upon a Thistle, which forever bears the imprint of this accident.) The Thistle is also associated with Scotland and is in fact the nation’s national emblem (When Scotland was ravaged by Viking invaders, the attacking Vikings crept up upon the sleeping Scots – unfortunately the Vikings stepped in Thistles with their barefeet and their cries of pain woke up the Scots who were able to fight off the attackers).
Magical uses: Thistle has great value in protection spells and also is used to bring spiritual and financial blessings. If Thistle is thrown into a fire, it will protect the thrower from being struck by lightning during summer storms. Thistle can be carried in an amulet bag for joy, energy,
vitality, and protection – in fact men who carry Thistle become better lovers! A shirt with Thistle woven into the cloth will protect the wearer from evil spirits. Thistle can be burned as an incense for protection and also to counteract hexing. Thistle powder can also be added to ritual baths to give added protection. Thistle can be grown in the garden to ward of those dreaded vegetable thieves, and a bowl of fresh Thistle will give off such good strengthening energies that it is the perfect thing to have in a
sickroom. Thistle is a wonderful material to use to make magic wands for spirit conjuring and magical walking sticks. In England, the wizards of old were said to select the tallest thistle and use it as a wand or walking stick. For a Witchling child, a thistle wand would be good because it might protect him or her from giving in to peer pressure. If you have a dream about Thistle this is a good thing because Thistles are good omens in dreams. Boil some thistle, then remove it from heat and lie or sit beside it as the steam rises. Listen carefully, and you should be able to get the spirits to answer your questions.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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