Thursday This Is Your Spell – Prosperity Pouch

March 4, 2010 at 10:00 am (Incense, Magic, Money, Oils, pagan, prosperity, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Prosperity Pouch
unknown source

Ingredients:

  • Green or gold cloth and bag
  • Cinnamon
  • Patchouli
  • Mint
  • Basil
  • Money oil*, cinnamon oil, or heliotrope oil
  • 1 small cinnamon stick
  • Malachite
  • Pyrite
  • 1 Gold Candle
  • 1 Green candle
  • Prosperity incense**

Empower all objects. Carve a prosperity rune or symbol on the candles and dress them with any of the above oils. Visualize your goal as you dress them. Add a chant if you like.

"Wealth and money, come to me
I deserve prosperity."

Light the candles on your altar or place of magic. Place the empowered herbs in the bag and ask for the blessings of the Earth. Wave the bag through the incense smoke and ask for the blessings of Air. Pass the bag through the flame of each candle and ask for the blassings of Fire. Anoint the bag with any of the money drawing oils and ask for the blessings of Water. Hold the stones and tell them what they are to do. Explain their magical purpose. Add them to your pouch. Take the cinnamon stick and drip some green wax on one end and gold wax on the other. These are 2 traditional money drawing colors but can also be viewed as colors for the Goddess (Green) and the God (Gold). Ask for their blessing on your spell. Say:

"For the good of all
And with harm to none
This is my will
And it is done!

*Money Oil

  • 2 oz. clear oil base
  • 3 drams bayberry
  • 1/2 dram vetivert
  • dash of light musk
  • goldleaf flakes
  • bottle (green if possible)

Add goldleaf flakes to the bottle. This should be made on a Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday as the moon waxes in an Earth sign (Taurus, Virgo or Capricorn)

**Prosperity Incense

  • 1 part Frankincense
  • 1/2 part Cinnamon
  • 1/4 part Nutmeg
  • 1/2 part Balm

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Herbal Prosperity Spell

August 20, 2009 at 10:04 am (Herb, Incense, Mabon, Magic, Oils, pagan, prosperity, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Herbal Prosperity Spell
From The Dust Gully

Cast a magic Circle or get into a magic space. Bring with you the following:

  • Mabon oil*
  • 1 gold or yellow candle
  • 1 black candle
  • 2 tbs. Each:
    • yarrow
    • rosemary
    • marigold
  • 1 clear quartz crystal
  • 1 citrine
  • 1 thurible
  • Mabon incense**
  • 1 instant light charcoal
  • 1 – 4 inch square of paper
  • 1 – 4 inch square of yelllow fabric, or magic bag
  • gold or yellow cord

In a circle, anoint the candles with the Mabon oil. Hold the gold candle and charge it with words to bring prosperity. So mote it be. Charge the black candle to draw you all that is safe, correct, and granted by the Gods and Goddesses.
Place the candles in the holders and as you light them say:

This flame is the light of the God Mabon and the Mother Goddess Modron.

Light the charcoal. Put a pinch of Prosperity Incense*** on it.  Take the paper and write your spell, what ever it may be, what ever you may want. Repeat this out loud, speaking to Mabon and Modron. Thank them for the bounty they have given you in the past. Think of the Wheel of the Year that has come before, and be truly thankful for all you have been granted. Smudge the spell in the smoke of the incense by passing the paper through the rising smoke. Roll the spell and tie with some yellow thread or cord and set it aside. Place the fabric square or magic bag in front of you with some gold cord to tie it. Pick up your dried herbs and stone one by one. Hold them in your hands. Lift your hands and show them to the God and Goddess. Visualize the light of the God and Goddess striking the object. Place the herbs and stone in the bag, tie , and set aside. Snuff out your candles or let them burn. You may want to relight them at a time when you want to again cast the spell. Carry the spell and magic bag with you.

*Mabon Oil

  • hazelnut oil
  • almond oil
  • pinch marigold leaves
  • walnut shells, usually crushed or in pieces
  • pinch oak leaves
  • 1 acorn
  • 1 stone ruled by the sun (yellow topaz, citrine, cat’s eye, amber)

**Mabon Incense

  • 3 tbs. each
  • marigold
  • dried oak leaves
  • fern
  • passionflower
  • frankincense and myrrh
  • dried apple
  • yarrow
  • rosemary
  • bittersweet
  • wheat

Add:

  • 1 dram mabon oil
  • 1 tsp. of shiny gold glitter or piece of gold jewelry.

Mix well. Place in bowl or burn.

***Prosperity Incense

  • 1 part Frankincense
  • 1/2 part Cinnamon
  • 1/4 part Nutmeg
  • 1/2 part Balm

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This – Kinda – Lammas/Lughnassadh Incense Recipes

July 15, 2009 at 10:12 am (Air, Herbs, Incense, Lammas, Lughnasadh, Magic, pagan, Recipe, Wednesday, Witch)

Lammas/Lughnassadh Incense Recipes

Basic instructions to make your own incense can be found here

Lammas Incense

  • 1/4 part Broom
  • 1/2 part Oregano
  • 1/2 part Cinnamon
  • 1/2 part Meadowsweet
  • 1/4 part Frankincense
  • 1/2 part Sandalwood

Lughnasadh Incense

  • 2 parts Frankincense
  • 1 part Heather
  • 1 part Apple Blossoms
  • 1 part Blackberry Leaves

Late Summer Incense Recipe
This blend is useful when practicing any kind of dream magic, whether you seek answers to a question, prophetic dreams or desire to "venture forth" while sleeping. The formula contains herbs that open the gates to dreams as well as those that have sedative properties. In addition many of the ingredients are classically associated with Summer and the Fey.
Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbsp Sandalwood
  • 2 tsp Lavender
  • 2 tsp Mugwort
  • 2 tsp Chamomile
  • 1 tsp Thyme
  • 1 tsp Benzoin
  • pinch Oregano
  • 1/8 tsp Guar Gum

Finely powder all ingredients, and then add just enough warm water to give the blend a consistency reminiscent of modeling clay. Form into tall thin cones, the diameter of which should be no bigger than a pencil at the widest point. Also, tightly form the cone to avoid cracks. Cracks will get bigger as the cone dries and prevent the finished cone from burning. Allow them to dry in a cool environment and then enjoy.

Hot Summer Night Incense
from Sweet Rock Incense

Ingredients:

  • 1 part Musk
  • 1 part Golden Embers
  • 1 part Vanilla

Grind into powder, mix well, burn on charcoal.

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Thursday This is Your Spell – Has Been Interrupted for Beltane Associations

April 23, 2009 at 3:06 pm (Associations, Beltane, Colors, Decoration, Fae, Faery, Faery Furniture, Fairies, Fairy, Fire, Flowers, Herbs, Incense, Magic, May Day, pagan, Thursday, Witch)

Beltane Associations
Unknown source

Herbs: Honeysuckle, St. John’s Wort, Hawthorn, All flowers
Incense: Frankincense, Lilac, Rose
Colors: Green, Soft pink, Blue and Yellow
Decorations: Maypole, Strings of beads or flowers, Ribbons, Spring flowers
Foods: Dairy, Oatmeal Cakes, Cherries, Strawberries, Wine Punches, Green Salads

Tools and Ritual Components:

Incense – Frankincense, Rose and Bluebells make a lovely scent to appease the Fey and bring trust and purification to your gathering.
Ritual Soap – Thyme and Rose for balance and beauty, and to tempt the faerie folk into joining your celebration.
Anointing Oil – Lily of the Valley, a traditional May Day flower.
Ritual Cup – Woodruff Wine to banish negativity, or Red Clover Tea, a Victorian favorite for spring.
Altar Decorations – Ivy, Rose, and Hawthorn adorn the altar, while fresh Marigold petals form the outer circle. Garnet is a symbol of union and may be placed central to the altar for fidelity, and friendship.
Clothing – Crown yourself with a wreath of Ivy. Wear bright, lively colors, especially the green of the forest to honor life and vitality.
Cakes – By May, strawberries have come into season. Why not enjoy them with Victorian popovers and a little cream? It’s one way of thanking the Earth for her bounty. Candied Violets are also a traditional Victorian treat for this holiday.

* Nine Woods Used in The Belfire *

Birch – (Attributes: Protection of children, purification, creativity) Add to the fire to represent the Goddess or female principle.
Oak – (Attributes: All positive purposes, magic for men, fidelity) Add to the fire symbolizing the God or male principle.
Rowan, or mountain ash – (Attributes: Divination, healing, astral work, protection) Add to the fire as the Tree of Life. .
Willow – (Attributes: – Romantic love, healing, protection, fertility, magic for women) Sacred to Hecate, add willow to the fire as a celebration of death.
Hawthorn – (Attributes: Fertility, peace, prosperity, binding) As Tree of Purification and a Sacred faeries tree, add hawthorn to the Belfire for purity.
Hazel – (Attributes: Manifestation, spirit contact, protection, fertility) As Tree of wisdom, add hazel to the fire to gain wisdom.
Apple – (Attributes: Fertility. Tree of love) Add apple wood to the fire for the magic of love.
Vine – (Attributes: Faerie work, Joy, Exhilaration, Wrath, Rebirth) This is the Tree of joy so add vine to the fire for joy.
Fir – (Attributes: Strength, life and immortality, rejuvenation) As the Tree of Immortality, add fir to your Beltane fire for rebirth.

Sources:

A Victorian Grimoire by Patricia Telesco

Celtic Myth and Magick by Edain McCoy (link to the book online)

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Wednesday What Herb Isn’t Herbal Today :( – How to Become A Witch in Nine Easy Lessons

February 25, 2009 at 3:05 pm (Acceptance, Fun, Humor, Incense, Magic, pagan, Psychic, Wednesday, Witch)

For those who are a little slow on the uptake, this is humor

In the 1980’s it was fashionable to be interested in the New Age. This is now a dreadful faux pas within the alternative scene, and in order to be accepted in the 1990’s metaphysical social set, one must have an interest in Witchcraft or Paganism. Of course, you don’t have to actually belong to a coven in order to be thought of as a Witch, you can bluff your way into being accepted as a fully fledged Witch simply by knowing a few terms and dressing accordingly. This brings us to…

  • Rule # 1: Image is Everything. After all, what’s the good of being a Witch if nobody knows you are one? You must therefore wear black at all times. If possible, stay out of the sun until you become really pale, as this makes the effect even better. For women (and adventurous males) dark eyeliner and black nail polish can enhance this look. Also wear crystals and cheap occult paraphernalia at all times, and make sure that these are as gaudy and bizarre as possible, as this can only help your image. Wearing a pentacle around your neck is an absolutely necessary accessory – the bigger the better! Capes and cloaks are optional around town – it depends on how much of a visual impact you want to make, but either of these are also crucial apparel at any ritual or gathering that you may attend.
  • Rule # 2: Name Dropping is Good. Every serious student of The Craft (and I’m talking here about the term for Witchcraft, not macramé) knows the name Gerald Gardner. This man revitalized Witchcraft in the mid 1900’s with his book about the true history of The Old Religion (some have called this book pure fiction, but only those picky few who like books to be based on facts). Real Witches however, never let historical accuracy get in the way of their spiritual path, so in conversations with other Witches, quote his name as often as possible (in tones of awe) and you will always be rewarded with smiles of acceptance.
  • Rule # 3: Past Life Name Dropping is Even Better. Tell everyone about the past life memories that have been surfacing since you began studying the Black Arts. It is especially useful to remember a past lifetime as a Witch who was killed during the Inquisition, or at least recall a lifetime as a famous occultist. My past lives have included Aleister Crowley, Cagliostro, Mandrake the Magician, and most of the cast of "Bewitched".
  • Rule # 4: Behave Strangely. Never forget why it was that you wanted to become a Witch – yes, so that you have an excuse for strange behavior. Previously labeled eccentric behavior patterns can now be accepted by others if they have a reason to explain it, even if that reason for howling at full moons while naked is simply, "He/she is a Witch, that’s normal for them evidently." So, don’t let your friends down, behave strangely, you can get away with it now.
  • Rule # 5: Watch Occult Movies. Make sure that you watch the movie "Warlock" lots of times to perfect those soft landings after over-indulging with the flying ointments (read as mead and weed).
  • Rule # 6: Ready Yourself for Sex, Money and Power. Wasn’t this the other reason you were drawn to Witchcraft? In the past, adepts of the occult were known to possess charismatic, lusty and powerful personas – when people find out that you are a Witch, they may automatically assume (and therefore empower you) with these same qualities. This may sound pretty good, but unfortunately in today’s world, another group of people have become even more established within the realms of kinky sex sessions and unlimited power – yes, the politicians! Beware of this elitist group of power-brokers…they don’t want any competition to their manipulative monopoly over the gullible public – hence the laws against Witchcraft and divination that have remained unchanged for centuries. So, if calling yourself a High Priest doesn’t lead you to unlimited sex, money and power – or if it does, but you then find yourself as the target of political and legal harassment – you may
    have to put aside your cloak and broomstick and pick up a pin-stripe suit and a back-bench in Parliament. If you can’t beat them, try bribery, then if that doesn’t work…join them!
  • Rule # 7: Atmosphere is Essential. Your home must reflect your Witchy nature. Incense must burn continuously. It’s important that visitors see clouds of incense smoke billowing from a spluttering censer in the corner of your dim, dank and dusty home, so dismantle the smoke detectors and start collecting strange little bottles of exotic looking ingredients (use your imagination and label them with names like powdered bat’s eyes, or dried dragon’s gonads). And if you don’t like housework, you can explain that the layer of dust that covers your floors and furniture helps to neutralize the highly charged psychic energy that results from your magical spells, thereby protecting your home and possessions from electromagnetic disintegration.
  • Rule # 8: Be Patronizing to Christians. In social discussions don’t forget to make plenty of derogatory remarks about fundamentalist Christians, but remember to save your most biting comments for other Witches that you don’t get along with.
  • Rule # 9: Brag About Your Psychic Powers. Any self-respecting Witch will tell you that after their initiation to Witchcraft, their psychic powers awakened and their tarot cards (which they always carry with them) are now much easier to read (they now get something right once in a while). They will also tell you that they can now sense energy fields (in other words, they don’t bump into things as often as they used to). Follow this example and brag about the rapid development of your psychic abilities since your initiation. If asked about your initiation ceremony, simply state that you were sworn to secrecy about it, then quickly change the subject by mentioning your newly awakened ability to detect Ley-lines, but try to remember that a Ley-line is not a queue for the after-ritual orgy!

Now you know how to pass yourself off as a real Witch, so place that broomstick in a conspicuous corner (one that is not clouded by too much incense smoke); pull on those black clothes; give everyone that you meet a sinister look – and your social status will improve overnight. If you do all of this successfully, you may even find yourself with enough adoring acolytes so that you can start your own coven! Good luck and Blessed Be!

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions / recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Mabon Herbal Prosperity Spell

August 14, 2008 at 12:15 pm (Circle, Incense, Mabon, Magic, Oils, pagan, prosperity, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

*Mabon Herbal Prosperity Spell*

Cast a magic Circle or get into a magic space.

Bring with you the following:

  • Mabon Oil***
  • 1 Gold or yellow candle
  • 1 black candle
  • 2 tbs. each of yarrow, rosemary and marigold
  • 1 clear quartz crystal
  • 1 citrine
  • 1 thurible
  • Mabon incense****
  • 1 instant light ‘charcoal’
  • 1 four inch square of paper
  • 1 four inch square of yellow fabric or magic bag
  • gold or yellow cord

In a circle, anoint the candles with the Mabon oil. Hold the gold candle and charge it with words to bring prosperity. Charge the black candle to draw you all that is safe, correct, and granted by the Gods and Goddesses. Place the candles in the holders and as you light them say:

“This flame is the light of the God Mabon
and the Mother Goddess Modron.”

Light the charcoal. Put a pinch of Mabon Incense on it.
Take the paper and write your spell, what ever it may be, what ever you may want.
Repeat this out loud, speaking to
Mabon and Modron. Thank them for the bounty they have given you in the past.
Think of the Wheel of the Year that has come before, and be truly thankful for all you have been granted.
Smudge the spell in the smoke of the incense by passing the paper through the rising smoke.
Roll the spell and tie with some yellow thread or cord and set it aside.
Place the fabric square or magic bag in front of you with some gold cord to tie it. Pick up your dried herbs and stone one by one. Hold them in your hands. Lift your hands and show them to the God and Goddess. Visualize the light of the God and Goddess striking the object. Place the herbs and stone in the bag, tie, and set aside.
Snuff out your candles or let them burn. (You may want to relight them at a time when you want to again cast the spell. . .)
Carry the spell and magic bag with you.

***Mabon Oil
Ingredients:
4 drops rosemary oil
4 drops frankincense oil
2 drops apple oil
1 drop chamomile oil
almond oil base

****Mabon Incense
1 part Sandalwood,
1 part Cypress,
1 part Juniper,
1 part Pine,
1/2 part Oakmoss,
1/4 part Oak

This was found in my collection, but can also be found at The Dustgully

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This – Myrrh

August 13, 2008 at 11:45 am (Cleansing, Herb, History, Incense, Lore, Love Spell Reversal, Mabon, Magic, Myrrh, pagan, Protection, Spell, Wednesday, Witch)

The true myrrh is known in the markets as karam, formerly called Turkey myrrh. Also called Gum Myrrh Tree, Daran, Mirra Balsom Odendron, Commiphora Myrrha, Mirra, Morr-Didin, Didthin, and Bowl. It was first recognized about 1822 at Ghizan on the Red Sea coast, a district so bare and dry that it is called ‘Tehama,’ meaning ‘hell.’ Today, most of the internationally-traded myrrh and frankincense are produced in the southern Arabian peninsula (Oman, Yemen) and in northeast Africa (Somalia). Myrrh, traded throughout the Middle East at least since 1500 B.C., eventually came to China. There is mention of myrrh in a 4th century (A.D.) Chinese book that is no longer existent but is quoted directly in a later text. As in the Middle East, myrrh was used in China for making incense, and is so used even today. It is traditionally used in pharmaceutical products, including mouthwashes, gargles, and toothpaste; also used in dentistry.  It is also extensively used as fixatives and fragrance components in soaps, detergents, cosmetics, and perfumes, especially oriental types and heavy florals.

Myrrh has had spiritual significance since ancient times and was also adopted as medicines for physical ailments. It has been used from remote ages as an ingredient in incense, perfumes, etc., in the holy oil of the Jews and the famous incense of the Egyptians -  Kyphi – for embalming and fumigations. It was said to come from the tears of Horus, the flacon-headed sun god, and large quantities of Myrrh were needed for the Egyptian temples in particular. It was often used in general magic workings, especially those requiring it to be burned at night. It was also used for banishing, and for beverage flavoring. as well as being an ingredient of Metopian, an Egyptian medicinal ointment used to treat ulcers, and cuts in sinews and muscles. (It appeared in papyrus medicinal manuscripts dating back to Khufu’s reign [2,800 BCE].) Myrrh was burned to the god Ra at noon in ancient Egypt, and it also fumed in the temples of Isis (sacred to Isis, Adonis and Ra) – in fact, it was burned in ancient temples of Babylon, Greece, India, Rome and China. Myrrh was a revered funeral herb, burnt as an incense to honor the dead. When referring to myrrh, Westerners might immediately think of it’s historic importance in religion. The herb is best known through the story of the Three Wise Men (Magi) delivering gold, frankincense, and myrrh for the baby Jesus; not only was myrrh present at the birth of Christ – as one of the Magi’s three gifts – but at his death as well being also used to anoint Jesus’ body after the crucifixion.   This herb, valued like gold, was mentioned repeatedly in the Old Testament, in instructions to Moses about making incense and anointing oil, and in the Song of Solomon. It is thought to have been one of the materials used by the Queen of Sheba in her seduction of King Solomon.

As a wash it is good for spongy gums and ulcerated throats. It is an astringent and stimulant, and can be used as an expectorant in the absence of feverish symptoms, healing. In tonic  form it is a stomachic carminative, exciting appetite and the flow of gastric juice. In liquid form it is an astringent wash. Among it’s many uses are as anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-spasmodic, antiviral, fungicidal, sedative, and stimulant (especially pulmonary). In modern Chinese Materia Medica it is classified as an herb for vitalizing circulation of blood and is utilized for treating traumatic injury, painful swellings, masses, and other disorders related to stasis syndromes. It provides easing and healing  of amenorrhea, arthritis, asthma, athlete’s foot, bronchitis, colds, cough, cracked heels, cuts, diarrhea, dysentery, dyspepsia, eczema, flatulence, gingivitis, gum infections, hemorrhoids, hyperthyroidism, laryngitis, loss of appetite, mouth ulcers,  pyorrhea, ringworm, sore throat, and thrush. It provides positive results when used for tuberculosis, ulcers, voice loss, wasting degenerative disease, wounds, and wrinkles. It also calms sexual excitement and treats uterine disorders.

In Druid and Wiccan tradition, it has been used in healing incense, especially with frankincense. The essential oil can be added to blends designed to enhance spirituality and meditation, and is also used in healing mixtures. The oil cam also be used for purification, consecration of sacred and ceremonial objects, protection and hex-breaking, and is generally regarded as excellent for religious rituals of magic. It was also commonly used in charm bags. It is regarded as advisable to anoint one’s house with Myrrh every morning and evening as part of any protection ritual. Inhale the myrrh fragrance to awaken your awareness of the spiritual reality behind our everyday existence. Use prior to or during religious rituals. It calms fears and halts questions concerning the future. Inhale the myrrh fragrance with visualization to speed healing of the physical body. Use in ritual to heighten awareness of the energy flow in both worlds. It aids meditation, expands wisdom and remains an essential herb in rituals of death and dying, as well as helping those grieving to understand the mystery of death. Myrrh is useful for those working through sorrows and traumas of all kinds and is of unequaled value to those suffering from sexual abuse. Burn the herb and walk through the area you wish to cleanse, or use to purify and protect whatever your wish. Pass objects through the smoke to cleanse of negative energy. Burn during healing wishes.  Myrrh is used in magic for protection, peace, and exorcism. As an incense it can be used to deepen mediation and aid contemplation. Mixed with other magical herbs, it is a standard in magic enhancement – it increases the powers of other herbs when they are used in conjunction. It is rarely burned alone, but usually in conjunction with frankincense or other resins.

Myrrh (as herb or essential oil) may be used in as an ingredient or substitute for magic spells and formulas related to lunar matters (compassion, dreams, family, fertility, gardening, healing, love, peace, promoting sleep, prophecy, prophetic (or psychic) dreams), psychic awareness, sleep, and spirituality). Be careful about substitutions for preparations that will be ingested or come in contact with the skin. These substitutions do not apply to medical uses.

To reverse any love spell, etch or write your name and the name of your bewitched lover on the side of a white votive candle. On any night of the Waning Moon, anoint the candle with myrrh oil, light the candle, and recite a chant or poem reversing the love spell. Burn the entire candle (do not leave lit candles unattended). Let the remaining wax cool and harden. Wrap the leftover wax in white cloth (preferably silk), tie with a white ribbon, and toss into a body of (preferably running) water (such as a river or the ocean).

Sources:

Mountain Rose Herbs

Botanical.com A Modern Herbal

Teenwitch.com

Full Moon Herbs

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Monday Make A – Magical Scented Pine Cones

August 11, 2008 at 11:30 am (Children, Crafts, Incense, Kids, Mabon, Magic, pagan, Samhain, Witch, Witchlets, Yule)

* Magical Scented Pine Cones *
From
Yvonne Loveday
Create these talismans in a magical circle for use during the Mabon, Samhain, and Yule seasons. Frankincense and myrrh are particularly spiritual herbs which have been used in religious ceremonies for ages. When burned, frankincense releases powerful vibrations as well as banishes negativity and evil. It protects, consecrates, purifies, and exorcises. It
is attributed to the Sun. Myrrh purifies, lifts vibrations, and creates peace. It is used to intensify the power of any incense to which it is added. Myrrh is attributed to the Moon. The fact that these two herbs are associated to the Sun and Moon is highly appropriate as we enter the Mabon season, a time of balance. And as we enter the dark half of the year, these herbs work together to push back our fears and anxieties. These pine cones are burned in the fireplace or cauldron.

Materials:

  • 2×2-inch pine cones (about 24)
  • Frankincense powder (1/4 cup, approximately 2 ounces)
  • Myrrh powder (1/2 cup, approximately 4 ounces)
  • Gold Glitter (1.4 cup)
  • White Crafts Glue
  • Cellophane bags (available from florist or crafts supply store)
  • Shallow container, such as a shoe box lid
  • Gold filigree ribbon
  • Newspapers

Directions:

Rinse pine cones with water. Lay cones on an old cookie sheet and place in 300 degrees oven for one hour. Spread cones out on layers of newspapers and set aside to complete drying. Blend frankincense, myrrh, and glitter in a shallow container. Dab glue on tips of pine cone petals and on the bottom of the cone. Roll cone in mixture of powder and glitter. Set cones aside to dry. Package in a handful of dried cones in cellophane bags to give as gifts. Tie bag shut with gold filigree ribbon. Attach a label with a holiday greeting and instructions for using the pine cones:

Enjoy the aromatic incense the cones release when burned. Toss a cone or two onto hot embers, and inhale the earthy fragrance. Or, set the cones in a dish for a
more subtly fragrant decoration.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Monday Make A – Backyard Incense

August 4, 2008 at 10:48 am (Crafts, Home, Incense, Kids, Mabon, Magic, Monday, Witch, Witchlets)

* Kid Craft – Backyard Incense *
By Aunt Becky

Making things, creating objects from nothing, spending quality time with your children and friends, and just having fun: these are some of the most important things in life. Whether we realize it or not, it makes us who we are. Creation is physical, spiritual, primal, joyful, and relieves stress.

But most of all it’s just plain fun!
The kids are running around the house like banshees from the nether world chanting things that make no sense. They have painted themselves, the cat, and the bathroom. The dog is wearing your best ritual robes because “she needs to look pretty for the goddess, too!” And you are sitting in the corner trying to figure out how to explain to anyone who happens to stop by that children really do like being duct-taped to the wall. And no, those aren’t gags, they’re educational vocal learning devices.
It’s definitely time to get out of the house.
If your children are anything like the ones I have in my life, they have been trying to get into your altar box since they could crawl. And when caught, all they’d have to say for themselves was “It smells so good in there,” or “I didn’t know any better,” or “Those things are so pretty!” The more creative (and manipulative) children will come at you with “the pixie in the corner told me I could,” or “But I want to be magic, too!” Well, what can you say to that? I say, let them discover that their play can be just as magical as my altar box.
Go out into the back yard. Help them take cuttings of the grass, the roses that are done blooming, and any flowers that might be in the garden. Heck, maybe even throw in a handful of dirt. Depending on the trees you have in your area, maybe some bark, leaves or pinecones can be added to the mixture. Put all this stuff on a screen wrapped loosely in newspaper from your recycling bin. If you have one, put it in a dehydrator, otherwise put it in a warm oven (just heated by the pilot light) or just where it can sit in the sun. Let it dry a couple days until all parts are brittle. Now the really fun part: using a coffee grinder, a mortar and pestle, or even a rock on the sidewalk, let the kids grind all the stuff into a coarse powder.
This should keep them busy for a while.
Note from me***Children have an innate & much stronger “magicalness” than we, as adults do. If your witchlet is so inclined, this is a good opportunity to help them learn to imbue something with the energy they desire. As they are grinding/pounding, have them focus on calmness, or happiness, or whatever energy it is they would like to have the incense release when it is burned. This is a very simple, yet very magical thing, and is an easy beginner’s step down the pagan pathway****
This might sound a bit weird to you, and in truth there are some things that just aren’t meant to be burned together, but trial and error is the key here. After a few tries and some charcoal you’ll find you really have created an incense that smells like home. We had a lot of fun doing this on a camping trip a few summers back. The place we went to was really quite pretty and worth remembering, and when we were done the incense we made smelled just like we were sitting in the middle of the woods. It was like a memory in a jar.
A few things to remember:

  • Don’t pick in protected areas
  • Don’t pick a flower if there’s only one of them — leave enough to maintain the population
  • Ask permission if you’re on private property.
  • If you’re not familiar with the plants, don’t pick them without looking them up. I don’t have to tell you it’s a bad idea to pick poison oak for your incense!
  • If you’re picking bark from a tree, be sure to only take a little,respectfully, and be careful of damaging the tree.

Have a great time and Blessed Be.
–Aunt Becky (Excerpted from the now-defunct San Diego Pagan; September 17th, 1998)
***Side Note: If you can get this link to work, or if you know where this site is now located, please let me know! This has been in my collection for years, and when I tried the link I so carefully saved, I got a “Server Not Found” Message ” 
😦
Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This – Sage

July 23, 2008 at 11:31 am (Cleansing, Herb, Incense, Lammas, Magic, Sage, Wednesday, Witch)

Also called Garden Sage, Red Sage, Sawge (Old English), Salvia salvatrix, Narrow-leaved White Sage, Broad-leaved White Sage Sage is a perennial herb with grayish-green leaves that are slightly hairy. It is native to Spain and the Mediterranean coast, and is a member of the Salvia family. It is a variable species, and it’s flowers can be blue, pink, or white. It can be grown in containers and makes a nice container specimen. While sage has links to many cultures throughout the world, it is thought to have originated in Syria. From there it spread throughout the northern Mediterranean and then on to the rest of the world via the trade routes. With over 500 species, from colored varieties to dwarfs to non – flowering varieties, sage is grown throughout the world (almost anywhere there is good drainage and full sun). Most of the varieties are perennials, fast growers, require low moisture and are deer resistant, making them a favorite with gardeners and cooks  Sage can be used fresh, dried, or chopped and frozen in ice cube trays. It has a lemony, camphor-like, and slightly bitter taste and it is a very aromatic herb.
For thousands of years sage has been used for a variety of culinary and medicinal purposes, and over the past 2,000 years or so has been recommended by herbalists to treat just about every known condition, from snakebite to mental illness. In fact, in medieval times the French called the herb toute bonne, which means, “all is well”. It has been used in connection with sprains, swelling, ulcers, and bleeding. As a tea, sage has been administered for sore throats and coughs. Herbalists have also used this herb for rheumatism, menstrual bleeding, strengthening the nervous system, improving memory, and sharpening the senses. Even today, in many European countries sage is used medicinally as a gargle for sore throat and inflammation of the mouth and gums. Clinical studies also indicate that the substance found in sage oil may also offer antibacterial, anti-fungal, and antiviral effects, explaining much of its medicinal activity. In Germany, sage herb is commonly used for upset stomach and excessive sweating, and one German study has found that drinking a sage infusion reduced blood sugar levels in people with diabetes, but only when they took the infusion on an empty stomach.  In England, sage is used for some symptoms of menopause. Sage has traditionally been used to promote menstruation, and there are some studies that indicate it may indeed help stimulate uterine contractions; pregnant women should not consume highly concentrated forms of sage, although using it as a culinary spice has not been shown to have this effect. Recent laboratory studies support the use of sage to guard against infection-it has demonstrated an ability to fight against several infection-causing bacteria. As far back as ancient Greek and Roman times, healers advocated sage for a variety of ailments. Charlemagne ordered that it be grown in his royal gardens. Arab physicians in the 10th century went so far as to claim that sage extended life to the point of immortality. Even the genus name of the plant, Salvia, comes from the Latin meaning “to cure.”
For sore throats, try mixing a Sage tea with apple cider vinegar and salt for gargling. Sage is reported to have moisture-drying properties, and can be used as an antiperspirant. It can also be used as a compress on cuts and wounds. Clinical studies have also shown that it can lower blood sugar in cases of diabetes. Try making capsules out of dried leaves as a substitute for teas for internal use. As an astringent, Sage can be used as a refreshing after-shave, and there is some indication that an infusion of it can be used to subtly color silver hair. As with many of the other herbs, Sage can also be tried in a tea for digestive problems and flatulence.
In an exciting new study done in 2003, English scientists at Newcastle and Northumbria found that Sage oil extracts in capsule form produced markedly improved memory function in test subjects, and it is very possible that Sage may protect a key chemical destroyed in the brain by Alzheimer’s disease. Better yet, no side effects whatsoever were reported by participants. Although studies are not complete at this time, this is very promising research and should be followed by anyone who has or is caring for someone with Alzheimer’s. Like two other culinary herbs, rosemary and thyme, sage helps guard against depletion of the brain’s concentration of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that is crucial to proper brain function. A combination of ginkgo biloba, sage, and rosemary may help prevent or slow the development of Alzheimer’s.
Very few side effects have been reported from the consumption of sage leaves; however, those using more concentrated forms of this herb, such as tea or extracts, may experience inflammation of the lips and lining of the mouth. This inflammatory response is probably due to a toxic chemical in sage called thujone. In very large amounts, thujone has been shown to cause convulsions. Concentrated sage oil is toxic and its use should be restricted to aromatherapy. Incidentally, you will often see Sage medicines advertised as Clary Sage. This is just another form of Sage that originates in the Mediterranean but has the same medicinal properties as the other sages.
Sage’s usefulness goes beyond the confines of the medicine cabinet and the kitchen. Because of its aromatic oils, it is frequently used in making soaps and perfumes. Native Americans utilize sage for spiritual purification ceremonies in the form of smudge sticks. These are branches of white sage (Salvia apiana) which have been cut into lengths about one foot long, bound together and dried. For the ceremony, they are lit and left to smolder, producing a rich, aromatic smoke.
Purification, Cleansing Sage is used in magic for wisdom, psychic awareness, long life and protection. As secondary aspects, spells for money use sage. But, by far, its most potent aspect is wisdom and learning. Sage is often bundled tightly into smudge sticks and burned as a scent. Sage was associated with immortality and longevity by the ancients. It was also credited with increasing mental capacity. Eat the fresh leaves (in moderation) for both these purposes. Today, Sage is believed to be a purifier and a healing herb. It can be made into a tea to promote healing, and can be burned to rid a room of negative energy.
Sage is bound to Jupiter and Air. It is believed that if you place some Sage (or burn it) near an object belonging to someone in need of healing, that healing will take place more quickly. It is also said that the condition of the Sage plant itself in your garden is an indication of your prosperity. Sage is useful in magic relating to immortality, longevity, wisdom, protection, prosperity. White sage leaves are widely used as a cleansing herb, to purify the mind, body and also to purify the atmosphere & to dispel negativity. It is also used to purify sacred items. Often carried in a charm bag or even a pocket to ensure personal and spiritual safety. It is said that those who eat sage become immortal in both wisdom and years. Sage is used in wish manifestations and to attract money. Smolder to promote healing and spirituality. Use in healing and money spells. Use as incense during sacred rituals — walk the smoke to the four corners of the room to repel and rid negative energies and influences. Especially good when moving into a new home. Heals wounds, aids digestion, eases muscle and joint pain, colds and fever.
To burn the sage — just place a small amount in a heat proof container into which you have put a charcoal disc light it, then direct the smoke around your body and the space you wish to cleanse You can also use a “smudging feather” or your hand to direct the smoke. You could even have ago at making your own smudge sticks. Which are easy to do and very rewarding to make. Never leave lit smudge unattended and care should be used when extinguishing and disposing of the ashes.
Sources:
Joelle’s Sacred Grove

Alchemy Works

Sally’s Place

The Magick Moon

Vitaminstuff

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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