Thursday This is Your Spell – Rose Spell For The Fey

May 20, 2010 at 9:20 am (Fae, Faery, Fairies, Fairy, Flowers, Litha, Love, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Plants, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Rose Spell For The Fey
Said to be from a 17th century work

Midsummer is a time when the Fey are out and about, so it seems like it would be a good time to try to attract some to your garden – if you want to. Roses attract the Faery to a garden. Their sweet scent will lure elemental spirits to take up residence close by. Roses can be used in Faery love spells. When performing the spell, sprinkle rose petals under your feet and dance softly upon them while asking the Faery for their blessing on your magic. Roses are loved by the fey so you can plant Roses in your garden to attract fairies. Wild Roses are best for this purpose and you need to say the following spell as you plant your baby Rose bush:

"I ask a fairy from the wild,
To come and tend this wee rose-child.
A babe of air she thrives today,
Root her soul in the Goddesses’ good clay.
Fairies make this twig your bower,
By your magic shall time see her flower!"

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Monday Make A – Plant an Elemental Garden

May 10, 2010 at 9:19 am (Air, Associations, Earth, Fire, Garden, Herbs, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, Monday, pagan, Plants, Spring, Water, Witch)

Plant an Elemental Garden
From About.com

If you’re a Pagan or Wiccan who’s into gardening, you might want to consider planting an elemental garden. The four classical elements are often associated with Pagan and Wiccan spirituality, so why not incorporate them into your gardening? Litha is a great time to work on your garden, so if you haven’t gotten out there digging in the dirt yet, now’s your chance! The sun is at its peak, the earth is nice and warm, and plants are growing all around. Move some of your existing plants (or put some new ones in) and create an elemental garden. By connecting different parts of your garden with the four elements, you can add a little bit of magic into your life each year. Here’s how to get started.

Before you plant anything, you’ll need to figure out how much space you have to work with. Ideally, you’ll want to make your elemental garden in a circle. To make a circle in your yard, figure out first where you want the center to be. Mark the center by driving a temporary stake into the ground. Next, figure out what diameter you want the circle to be. Using a piece of string tied to the top of the stake, walk around in a circle, marking the perimeter. You can do this with birdseed, a handful of dirt, or anything else you like. Once you’ve marked your circle, till up the soil. Although it’s good exercise to use a shovel, it’s also backbreaking work. If you’ve got a large space to cover, you may want to invest in a good rototiller.

Once you’ve tilled up the soil, figure out which way is north. You can do this easily with a compass, or if you know where the sun rises and sets, it shouldn’t be too hard to determine which way is east and which is west. After you’ve figured out your directions, divide your circle into quadrants, so that each direction has one quarter of the circle. Mark your spaces with stones. You can either use small ones, (don’t just throw away the ones you dig up!), or you can use large pavers

Each of the four directions is associated with an element. North is connected to Earth, East to Air, South to Fire and West to Water***. To plant your elemental garden, figure out which plants are connected with those particular elements – and this will vary depending on where you live. For example, Earth is associated with stability and security. Why not plant some herbs there that carry the same associations? Bryony, cinquefoil, honeysuckle, and pennyroyal * are all related to Earth.

For the East section of your garden, which is tied into the themes of Air, use plants connected with inspiration, wisdom and knowledge. Sage, marjoram, mugwort and members of the mint family are perfect for this quarter of the circle. In the South, select plants related to the passionate qualities of Fire, such as basil, betony, rosemary and rue. Finally, the West quadrant is where your Water-related plants should go – hyssop, yarrow, chamomile and ivy will do well in this section.

* Be cautious when selecting plants for your garden, and be sure to do your research. Some forms of pennyroyal are toxic and can cause miscarriage in pregnant women, and can be potentially fatal if ingested by small children.

As you dig a hole for each plant, you may wish to add a blessing. Get your hands in the dirt, dig in, and feel the soil. Thank the Earth for the gift it’s going to give you. As you place the plant or seeds in the hole, you might want to offer something like:

May the gods smile upon this plant,
bringing it strength and long life.

Or, you may prefer to offer a specific blessing for each quadrant – for the South section, offer a blessing of Fire, for the West, a blessing of Water, and so on. In some traditions, it’s popular to smudge the garden or perform some other purification rite after planting – after all, a garden is a sacred space.

If you’re going to spend any time in your elemental garden – and you’ll need to, if you don’t want your plants to die – it’s not a bad idea to add accessories that make you feel at home. It doesn’t have to be fancy, but you might want to consider some of the following:

  • Statues of the gods of your tradition
  • A gazing ball
  • A fountain or other water feature
  • A fire bowl
  • A small altar
  • A bench or chair for meditation
  • Wind chimes or bells
  • A prayer pole or decorative flag

To tie in the accessories to the elemental theme, consider a Water feature in the South corner, a small brazier to the West, a pile of stones in the North, or a decorative flag on the East portion. Any of these will be perfect for bringing you closer to the elements in your garden. Make your garden a place where you can sit and reflect, and it will indeed be a spiritual and magical place!

Do you live in an apartment or dorm room, or some other location with limited space? Don’t worry – you can still grow things! Container gardening makes it a breeze. Use flower pots, hanging baskets, or other items arranged in a group of four to create your elemental garden. You can even paint them with colors or symbols associated with the four cardinal directions. If you’re really strapped for space, use one container with four plants in it. For more ideas, be sure to visit our Container Gardening site at About.com.

***Note from Dawtch – I have said this numerous times, but just in case there’s a new reader out there, my PERSONAL associations are different – North is Air, East is Earth. For more of my views, you can go here.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Friday Form A Circle – Celli Laughing Coyote’s Beltane – A Solitary Ritual

March 26, 2010 at 9:45 am (Ancestors, Beginnings, Circle, Earth, Friday, Garden, Magic, pagan, Plants, Ritual, Solitary, Witch)

Celli Laughing Coyote’s Beltane – A Solitary Ritual
by Celli Laughing Coyote
Found at
Tarna’s Mystic Realm

 

This can be done indoors or outdoors, please choose your plant accordingly. This is a good time to do your yearly tree planting also.

Needed:

  • altar set up
  • crystal
  • feather
  • tobacco or sage
  • fertilizer
  • tree
  • plant or seeds
  • some soil and a pot or prepared ground
  • water
  • a pan or basin of some sort – if you are inside in an area that is big enough to do some repotting and watering.

Pre-wet the potting soil so you don’t need to do much watering or dig hole for plant or tree. Cast circle in the usual way, Then say:

"I have come here to nurture and replenish our Mother, the Earth, by planting and caring for one of her children. So I show my love of her and Humanity. I have come here to bring forth a new life unto our Mother’s and Father’s service. For the greatest of blessings is service."

Smudge plant, crystal, potting soil and any fertilizer, feather and anything that will be placed into the soil/hole. Then meditate with the crystal for a few moments upon the purpose of this ritual. Then: (substitute your own deities if you wish), add small amount of soil to pot and say:

"Grandfather Eagle, Bless this Child of Earth with clean air for growth."

Place feather in pot/hole and say:

"Grandmother Rabbit, Bless this Child of Earth with passion for growth."

Place ash from smudge holder in hole [make sure it is out]. Then place plant in pot with dirt about 1/2 the way up and say:

"Grandfather Bear, Bless this Child of Earth with sufficient water for growth."

Pour Water into hole – save some water for the end of the ritual, and say:

"Grandmother Buffalo, Bless this Child of Earth with sufficient food for growth."

Place fertilizer in hole or pour a little more water in if it is the kind that you mix with water. Say:

"Great Spirit, Bless this Child of Earth with your protection."

Place Tobacco/sage in hole. Say:

"Mother Earth, Bless this Child of Earth with your Nurturing Love."

Place what Crystal in hole. Say:

"Ancestors and Totem Spirit, Bless this Child of Earth with growth and your Guidance."

Place the extra smudging sage in hole. Fill in the pot with dirt. If you have a song or poetry say it at this time. pour the rest of the water over the plant (please don’t drown the plant in water) and say:

"Blessed Be!"

Bless and eat your cakes and wine. If your plant is outdoors give your offerings to the plant – if it is indoors or in a pot just leave a crumb and a drop and take the rest outdoors. Cake tends to have sugars in it and it could cause mildew or encourage bugs to live in your plants. Close your circle as usual.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Wednesday What Herb – kinda – The Magick of Houseplants

February 17, 2010 at 10:41 am (Associations, Flowers, Garden, Herb, Home, Magic, Ostara, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

The Magick of Houseplants
by
Elizabeth Farrell

Garden Witchery is a wonderful way for Pagans of any belief to connect with the element of earth. All plants have their own special energies and magickal influences, but this article will focus primarily on houseplants. Because space can be limited for many Pagans and Witches, keeping houseplants or a small indoor garden in the home can offer various types of assistance in daily spiritual work.

Besides being naturally connected with the element of earth, the energy of each plant is also connected to its own individual element, is ruled by one of the planets and has either feminine or masculine energy. For example, Lavender is a masculine plant ruled by Mercury and its element is Air. These connections, or correspondences, are the backbone of ritual and spell work but they are also handy to know about when it comes to strengthening or softening the energy in your home.

Different types of plants need different care, so it’s a good idea to do a little research into the proper care of a plant when you purchase it. Also keep in mind that some plants are toxic in nature and should be kept well out of the reach of children and pets. For instance, English Ivy is highly toxic in nature and is best not kept in a house with young children. If you are in doubt about a plant’s toxicity, call your local plant nursery to ask for information.

The following is a list of common plants that you may wish to keep in your home, their magickal correspondences and energies.

Aloe:

  • Gender- feminine
  • Planet-Moon
  • Element-water

The sap of the Aloe Vera plant is well known for its ability to soothe minor burns and insect bites but this plant also has properties that are magick in nature. It helps to ward off negativity and is good to work with in protective/healing rituals and spells. Aloe is also said to be of assistance in preventing household accidents and its energy is especially useful in the kitchen area.

Crocus:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet- Venus
  • Element- water

Helps to nurture love and peaceful visions. When placed next to your bed it can help promote peaceful and creative dreams.

Cacti:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet-Mars
  • Element- fire

All Cacti are protective in nature and can absorb negativity. They also help to protect against intrusions of any kind and burglaries.

Cyclamen:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Venus
  • Element-water

Cyclamen is good for use in love and fertility spells and helps to promote passion.

Fern:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet- Mercury
  • Element-air

Keeping potted ferns in your home or on your patio helps to encourage protection and health. The fern is a favorite of fairies and carrying or wearing a sprig of a fern frond is said to aid in finding treasure.

Ivy:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Saturn
  • Element-water

Ivy, in all its varieties, is a plant that brings protection, fertility and faithfulness. A sacred plant in Wicca, it is often associated with the Holly tree.

Orchid:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Venus
  • Element-water

Romantic in nature, the orchid is often used for love charms and spells. It can also help to enhance psychic powers and creative visions.

Venus Flytrap:

  • Gender-masculine
  • Planet- Mars
  • Element-fire

The Venus Flytrap is a good love attractant and can also be kept in the home for protection.

Lily:

  • Gender-feminine
  • Planet-Moon
  • Element-water

Protective in nature, the lily promotes happiness, love, harmony and peace. Can be very toxic so be sure to keep all lily plants away from children and pets.

Use your own intuition when it comes to finding the right plants for your home and how to arrange them. Also, by communicating with the plants you currently have in your home, you can find the kind of magick and energy that your plants have to offer you.

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This – Basil

January 20, 2010 at 10:36 am (Associations, Basil, Brid, Bride, Brighid, Brigit, Herb, Herbs, Imbolc, Magic, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

Basil has been called "the Witches Herb" for centuries. Basil has been used for exorcism, protection, in "flying ointments", and love potions. "Where Basil grows, no evil goes!" and "Where Basil is, no evil lives," goes the old adages. Basil, given as a gift, will bring good luck to a new home. Sprinkled around the house, it wards off evil. Soak it in water for three days and sprinkle the water at your doorstep to bring money and success, drive away evil, and have a happy family. add this to the water for scrubbing and cleansing the floors and walls. AFTER moving in, and regularly dried Basil should be sprinkled on the kitchen floor and swept out the door. If possible a basil plant should be planted near the home (or inside in a pot) to bring protection and good fortune to everyone who lives inside. If you have a job interview coming up, you can sprinkle this outside of the building where you hope to be employed (careful though if someone sees you it won’t help your job prospects very much!).

To increase love in the home, use it in cooking or keep some in an open bowl in the kitchen and replace it each week. Mixed in a bath with love herbs (such as red clover, rose buds, catnip, gentian, damania, lavendar, cubebs, and juniper berries ), it increases affection in the family. Basil also protects from evil. Mix with rosemary and rue for a cleansing and protective bath. Pour the water into your bathwater, and rest in the water for 20 minutes allowing the essence of the herb to coat you to provide protection from negative energy.

Imbolc is the traditional time of year for initiations and the initiate should have been taking daily tonics of basil for at least the last two weeks. It is given now to prepare the innerself for initiation to bring fortitude. In situations where you feel you will need protection, steep a teaspoon of fresh basil in one cup of boiling water. Let the basil steep for 5-10 minutes, than strain the herbs from the water. 

Basil oil rubbed on a green candle before burning will attract wealth. The incense smoke is beneficial for the same, as well as for banishing, exorcising and  protection.

 

Oil of basil helps fight colds, coughs, cramps, fever, anxiety, and much more. Basil is a stimulating and antidepressant oil which relieve can mental fatigue, clear the mind, and improve concentration. It is an expectorant and antiseptic, used for all types of chest infections. It’s also good for congested sinuses, chronic colds, head colds and whooping cough. The antispasmodic and carminative properties of basil help to relieve abdominal pains, indigestion, and vomiting. It works well on tired muscles, especially in massage oil used after hard physical work or strenuous exercise, it also eases arthritis and gout. It is reputed to be one of the best nerve tonics among all essential oils. Forget the Prozac, Basil can be used for the relief of depression – but over use will cause depression. Avoid if pregnant. Good for respiration conditions, such as Asthma and Bronchitis. As it has an effect upon Adrenal Cortex it can be effective with allergies. Sweet Basil is great for aiding concentration and sharpening the senses.

 

Basil has been known and grown since ancient times. Back in the first century AD, the Greek physician Dioscorides believed basil dulled the sight and produced "wind." According to Gerard in his Herbal published in England in the 1600s, the smell of basil was "good for the heart and for the head." Gerard also advised that the juice of the plant was good against headaches, if it were drunk with wine, and was useful in clearing up diseases of the eye. In Italy, a pot of basil on your balcony means you are ready to receive suitors. In India, the herb is dedicated to Vishnu and is given to the dead to help ensure their entrance to the afterlife. Prostitutes used to wear it in Spain to attract business. believed to have derived its name form the Basilisk, the fabulous dragon-like creature that was deadly to anyone who looked at it. This may have spawned the old belief that Basil begot scorpions. Some claimed it bred scorpions and that scorpions would be found beneath a pot where basil grew—a belief that arose, perhaps, from the prevalence of scorpions in some of the tropical regions of Asia and Africa, where basil originated, and their predilection for warm, dark places. Gerard wrote that those who were stung by a scorpion would feel no pain if they had eaten basil. Culpepper, a contemporary of Gerard, suggested in his Herbal that basil would draw out the poison of venomous beasts, wasps or hornets. Basil made its way to Europe by the Middle Ages and to England and America in the mid-17th century, where it was used mainly medicinally. It was not until the 19th century that basil became the ever-present component of herb gardens that it is today. Basil is also very important in Asia and Asian cuisines. The range of basils available is the result of the variability of the species, basilicum. The species contains a natural diversity of fragrances and colors; plant breeders have selected for and improved on these different traits.

Growing From Seed
Whether you sow seeds indoors or out, remember that basil does not like cold
or even cool, weather. Sow the seeds outdoors when day and night temps reach about 55 to 60 degrees. When sown or transplanted at the right time, basil is one of the easiest herbs to grow successfully.

Starting Basil Indoors
Plan to sow seeds 4 to 6 weeks before the date of your average last frost in
spring. Basils do not need a long time to grow large enough to transplant to the garden.

  • Fill a shallow container, or flat, or individual 2- to 21/4-inch pots with
    a commercial seed-starting mix. Moisten the mix and let it drain.
  • Sow the seeds in rows in a flat or two to three seeds per pot. Cover the
    seeds with about 1/4 inch of the mix. Press the mix down lightly and spritz
    the surface with water to moisten it and settle the seeds.
  • To keep the mix from drying out while the seeds are germinating, cover the
    containers with sheets of clear plastic wrap, or place each in a plastic bag
    and close it with a twist-tie.
  • Set the containers in a warm location; the growing medium should be at
    about 70-75 degrees F (21-23 degrees C). Seedlings will emerge in 4 to 7 days. When they do, remove the plastic covering and place the containers in bright light or direct sun in a south-facing window or a fluorescent light
    garden. Give the containers a quarter turn every few days so the plants grow straight instead of leaning towards the light source.
  • Keep the mix evenly moist by watering from the bottom: Set the containers
    in a sink filled with a couple of inches of water until beads of moisture
    appear on the surface. A liquid fertilizer at one half the recommended rate
    can be given to seedlings to promote healthy plants.
  • When the seedlings are about 2 inches tall and have at least two pairs of
    true leaves, transplant those in flats to individual pots. Thin those
    started in small pots to one per pot by snipping off all but the strongest
    looking one with a scissors. It is not necessary to transplant purple-leaved
    basils, such as `Dark Opal’ and `Purple Ruffles’, if you sow them about
    1/2-1 inch apart.
  • If young plants become tall and spindly, the growing tip can be pinched to
    encourage branching and compact growth. Some of the smaller basils, such as `Spicy Globe’, have a naturally branching habit and do not need to be
    pinched.

Sowing Directly in the Garden.
Sow seeds in the garden when the soil has warmed up to about 55 to 60 degrees day and night temperatures. Sow the seeds about 1/2 inch deep in good garden soil; if you cover the seeds with less soil, they may float to the surface after a heavy rain. Basil germinates readily, therefore you do not need to sow thickly. You can sow the seeds in rows or in groups; drop two to three seeds in each hole for the latter. Keep the seedbed moist until germination occurs. When the seedlings have at least two pairs of true leaves and are 2 to 3 inches tall, thin them to stand 10 to 30 inches apart, depending on the species or cultivar. Begin pinching out the growing tips for compact growth when the seedlings are 3 to 4 inches tall.  To have an uninterrupted supply of fresh basil, most gardeners sow basil seed several times during the growing season. The National Garden Bureau recommends sowing basil seed every 3 to 4 weeks to harvest fresh leaves for culinary uses.

Garden Uses
Basil is as ornamental as it is edible. Put it in a traditional herb garden, in the vegetable plot in the center of a bed of red- and green-leaf lettuces or edging a bed of tomatoes. Use both the green- and purple-leaved varieties in borders; the latter are especially beautiful with perennials such as coral bells (Heuchera `Palace Purple’), Sedum `Vera Jameson’, fountain grass (Pennisetum), dusty miller, and blue Salvia farinacea. Both combine well with annuals, such as dwarf or medium-height snapdragons, nicotiana, French marigolds, and petunias.

With its natural round shape, the dwarf basil `Spicy Globe’ makes a wonderful edging for any type of garden: perennial, rose, or herb. Try the old-fashioned technique of keeping flies away by planting basils around a patio or in containers on a deck.

Taking Care of Basil
Like most herbs, basils do not require much maintenance. In sandy or infertile soil, fertilize basil plants for continuous growth. If you amended the soil with organic matter, you may not need to fertilize basil. Basil plants need about an inch of water a week. Water, if rain does not provide for the plant’s needs.
Although the flower spikes are attractive, it is recommended to cut them off
as they deplete the plants’ energy resulting in fewer leaves. The leaves have the best flavor—the most essential oils—when they are harvested before the plants flower. Cut whole stems rather than individual leaves, especially if you want to use the leaves as a garnish because they bruise easily. Cutting whole stems is a tasty way of creating a bushy, compact plant: Cut just above a pair of lower leaves; the plant will produce new shoots at that point.

Growing in Containers
Basils are excellent herbs to grow in containers because they add such attractive colors and textures to the plantings. They look good in pots or
window boxes in full sun. A container of basil by the back door or on a deck
provides easy access for harvesting! The container should have drainage holes in the bottom or sides. Fill it with a soilless mix, which is more lightweight than garden soil and is also free of diseases and weed seeds. It is easy to provide nutrients all season by incorporating a controlled-release fertilizer in the mix before planting. With mixed plantings, place most basils near the center of containers or at the ends of window boxes. Use dwarf basils to edge a container planting or on their own in smaller, 8-inch pots, and place the pots around a larger planter, marching up steps, or along a walk. Basils combine well with other herbs and with annuals.

Plant basils at the same level as, or just slightly deeper than, they were growing in their original pots. Water the container well after planting. Keep the plants evenly moist through the growing season; the roots of any plants in a container cannot reach down or out in search of available moisture. Smaller containers will require more frequent watering than large ones. If you plant in a window box, remember that overhanging eaves may prevent rain from reaching the plants. Because it can overwinter in the soil, don’t plant basil in the same location every year. Avoid excessive watering and provide proper drainage  

From Garden to Kitchen 
One of the most useful herbs – a key ingredient for many Italian and Indian
dishes and great when fresh in salads. The ‘fresh-from-the-garden’ taste is
far tastier than the dried variety.
Basil complements many kinds of dishes and combines well with other herbs, whether used fresh or dried. The flavor and appearance of the leaves are best fresh. Many gardeners are unable to eat their fresh, homegrown tomatoes without fresh basil and a dash of premium olive oil. Freshly harvested basil leaves added to mesclun or lettuce salads liven up the flavors. Pesto is another favorite use for basil. Create the classic pesto sauce, a combination of basil, garlic, olive oil, pine nuts, and freshly grated Parmesan cheese.

Whip up basil butter. Cream together one stick of unsalted butter and 1-3
tablespoons of dried, crushed basil or 2-6 tablespoons of fresh, minced basil. Place in a covered container or roll into a cylinder-shape and refrigerate for at least an hour before using.

Make basil vinegar to use in salad dressings. Heat vinegar (any type) in an enamel pan; pour it into a bottle and add several sprigs of basil. Let set for 2 weeks before using.

If you have any basil left at the end of the growing season consider drying the leaves. To dry basil, cut the entire plant and hang on a string in a well ventilated room. When dry, just pluck the leaves from the stems and store in airtight jars out of direct light.

Windowsill Plants
It is easy to bring container-grown plants inside, but you can also pot up a few plants from the garden. Cut them back rather severely—to about 3-4 inches tall—so they will put out new growth when they become acclimated to the indoor environment. Grow them on the sunniest windowsill you have, preferably with a southern exposure, or put them in a light-garden. Keep the soil evenly moist and fertilize them once a month.
Because basils are so easy to grow from seed, however, the National Garden
Bureau recommends it is just as simple to sow fresh seed indoors at the end
of the outdoor growing season. Pot the seedlings into individual 4- to 6-inch containers and enjoy fresh basil all winter harvested from your windowsill.

Special thanks to Eleanore Lewis as the author of one of the source articles
Sources: National Garden Bureau
Herb-Magic

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb Is This (kinda…) – Planting Magical Gardens

January 13, 2010 at 11:06 am (Associations, Decoration, Dragon, Dragons, Garden, Herb, Herbs, Magic, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

Planting Magical Gardens
From
Magical Gardens : Myth, Mulch & Marigolds
By Patricia Monaghan

Tender shoots, sleeping seeds,
Gentle Devas,
Watch over this garden,
Make it fertile, make it green,
Make it bloom.

All gardens are magical-and all gardeners are magicians. With the wizardry of earth and seed, the gardener transforms the world into a place of beauty, power, and healing. This year, acknowledge the connection between gardening and magic deliberately by creating a sacred space dedicated to your craft. Perhaps it will be a small space filled with significant plants and symbols-one to admire from your window-or it might be a larger space, big enough for meditations, invocations, and general witching work. Your garden might be dedicated to a deva or divinity; it might recall an ancient ritual or myth in its selection and placement of plants. Your dreams and traditions will tell you how to build your own Witches’ garden. Here are a few ideas to inspire you.

A Witches’ Pentacle Garden

The pentacle, the witch’s symbol, makes a simple shape for a garden of mixed perennial and annual flowers. To construct such a garden, find a sunny spot of any size and dig out a circular bed. Within it, "draw" a pentacle by stringing twine among five posts, set equally distant around the circle. This will create a central pentagon. Fill it with plants whose names express your craft: "Diana"; the "daylillies" named "Merry Witch" and "Wicked Witch", "Witch’s Thimble" and "Moon Witch"; and "Magic Lilies", whose flowers bolt surprisingly directly from the ground, to bloom with extravagant fragrance.

Plant the arms of your starry pentacle with light-green chamomile around a filling of darker-green mint; then place round clumps of Dianthus "Essex Witch" at each point of the star. Surround this whole design with a circle of green parsley, and densely plant dainty sweet alyssum as the pentacle’s background. Your pentacle is now ready to shine back at the night’s stars-and at you.

A Two-Headed Flower Dragon

Dragons in the garden? Why not? As symbols of the element of water, dragons should be welcome among your flowers. Try constructing a garden in the shape of a two-headed dragon, called an amphisbaena. Use a hose to outline a circle. Making a opening in the circle, create an inner circle offset from the first, forming snaky "dragon heads" at the entry. Then build a scaly back at the thickest part of the circle, with two trellises planted with "Magic Dragon" roses and separated by several feet. Opposite, make eyes with dwarf Japanese holly called "Green Dragon"; surround them with the ground-covering liriope called "Silver Dragon", which will form a soft hair to offset the dragon’s eyes.

A band of perennial creeper "Dragon’s Blood" sedum forms the belly of your dragon. Behind it and before the trellises, establish drifts of "False Dragonhead". Finally, on the outer edges of the garden, plant the scaly surge called "Jade Dragon". Between the trellises, place a bench, then add porcelain pots with dragon designs at its sides. Your garden will never thirst with such a protector guarding it.

Central Africa was terrorized by the mokelembembe, Ethiopia by the dragon of Silene, Italy by the tatzelworm, France by the peluda and tarasque. In Scandinavia, Fafnir struck fear into hearts while England was terrorized by the Mordiford wyvern and the Lambton worm. Dragons and dragon deities are found in the mythology of every continent, from Australia (where the bunyip reigns) to subarctic Canada (where we find tales of dragon-whales). Sea lizard, dragonet, basilisk, amphipter, pyrali, sirrush – these are some of the names given to this fierce and often fearsome figure. Its form is almost as variable as its name, for it appears winged and wingless, serpentine and footed, with a huge tail or none at all. Whatever its form, however, the dragon is acknowledged the world over. The culture to which the dragon has been most symbolically important is that of China, where ancient emperors reserved to themselves the right to display the image of the riveted dragon, while their attendants could claim only the forted.

Ancient China saw the dragon as a complex creature with the head of a camel, eyes of a demon, horns of a stag, a cow’s ears, a snake’s neck and a clam’s belly. Its feet were those of tigers, its claws those of eagles, and its 117 scales are those of a fish – 81 of them beneficial, 36 malignant. A creature of earth, water, sky, the dragon’s special role was as intermediary between and among these parts of the cosmos. A Chinese dragon lived an incredibly long time. Perhaps 3,000 years passed from the time one hatched from its multicolored egg to its impressive maturity. The dragon passed through many stages, living as a water snake when young, then growing a carp’s head and becoming a fish for almost a thousand years. It took another 500 years to grow the stag’s horns on its head. Lastly, its branching wings thrust out – taking more than a thousand years to do so. Once Mature, a dragon could take on one of many possible tasks. The ti-lung protected streams and rivers. The fu-ts’ang lung guarded treasure. The yu lung helped mortals pass examinations. A few were given especially important tasks, such as that of the Yellow Dragon of the River Lo, which unveiled the trigrams of the I Ching to humankind.

In Europe, the dragon appears as a powerful creature with whom combat is the ultimate test for a hero. While some claim the dragon is a symbol of evil, less dualistic thinkers have interpreted the dragon’s mythic role as that of ‘guardian at the gates’, protecting spiritual secrets from those not strong enough, or not yet ready, to understand them. Thus St. George, slaying the dragon, becomes an image of a hero conquering his own weaknesses and fears in order to enter a greater spiritual initiation, rather than an emblem of right’s might.

Why a dragon garden? Why invite this fierce being to your doorstep? There are two reasons to consider adding dragon energy to your garden. Firstly is the dragon’s connection with the forces of underground power, especially underground water. Secondly is the dragon nature of gardening itself, for in encountering the willful ways of our gardens, we encounter the lessons our spirit needs to learn. Every gardener is, to some extent, St. George slaying the demons of pride and grandiosity, of carelessness and excessive control. A dragon garden thus makes visible the soul’s struggle with itself that is the essence of conscious gardening. In welcoming the dragon into our gardens, we honor the generations of gardeners who have struggled with the energies of the earth and learned from that struggle.

A Spiral of Trees

It is especially appropriate to center a dragon garden on trees, for these long-lived woody plants have symbolic meanings similar to the dragon itself; the tree, like the dragon, is a being of many levels. Its hidden roots are deep underground and its trunk points upward into the sky. Like the dragon, the tree partakes of the three levels; below, middle earth and above. Spiraling in to its central tree, a stunning dragon’s eye pine, this garden grove should be placed in a sunny, open part of your property. As the shrubs and trees mature, they will provide substantial shade as well as a secret meditation spot where you can encounter your own dragon energy.

You will need a space that is between forty and fifty feet in diameter to make both trees and gardener happy. Place this garden where you wish to eliminate an unattractive view, where you wish to provide more privacy, or where you want a deeply shaded retreat for oppressively hot days. Note that this, unlike most of the gardens in this book, requires a warm climate, most of the trees are not hardy beyond zone six. The tree that forms the center of this spiral-pathed garden grows to a significant height, perhaps sixty feet within twenty years. The trees and shrubs that spiral out from it diminish in height to small shrubs at the garden path’s entry. Thus, as you follow the short path into the garden, you have a sense of entering a forest of increasing depth and mystery. At the spiral’s center, place a bench or several rustic chairs to encourage meditation and conversation. Although this garden will take a decade for its unique character to emerge, it will become a favorite haunt for residents and visitors as it grows into its full majesty.

The garden is shaped in a spiral, a reference both to the spiraling kundalini energy of the dragon and to the shape these mythic creatures often assume in Asian art, their tails stretching out from their circled bodies. The garden’s central tree is the unusual dragon’s-eye pine, named for its long needles banded with red and green rings. Next to it are two tall, bluish columns of Chinese Dragon spruce with unusual purplish gray bark. Spiraling beyond are three pyramidal Black Dragon Japanese cedars, whose bright green growing tips dot the dark older foliage. Next, comes three evergreen Japanese holly of the variety called Black Dragon; these mounding shrubs bear dark green clustered leaves on intricately twisting branches. Three Dragon azaleas will grow to five feet tall, bearing masses of brilliant red flowers in mid spring; their dense evergreen foliage provides privacy at the opening to the garden. Finally, two tiny Green Dragon Japanese holly form the dragon’s tail.

Around this tree spiral, plan drifts of three plants: Dragon Claw and Marbled Dragon ivy, the first with waxy deep cut leaves, the second with white veined multi-toned leaves; and Silver Dragon liriope, a magnificent variegated lily-turf groundcover whose spikes of lavender flowers will brighten the path in late summer. Draw the groundcovers out at least two feet beyond the last holly bush, bringing the dragon’s tail to as sharp a point as possible. Once the plantings are in, pave the path with cedar chips or other natural material. A stone or paved path is inappropriate to the feeling of a forest glade that you are striving to create. As the pines and spruce mature, they will add their litter to the pathways, creating a more natural ambiance.

The Artemisia Glade

The common garden plant artemisia is said to have so delighted the wildwood goddess Artemis that she named it after herself. In her honor, establish a little glade of her favorite flower. Find a narrow area with good Sun, then fill it with drifts of the silver-leafed plants. Given Artemis’ penchant for wilderness, be sure to avoid regimented rows! Begin by establishing focal points with tall "Artemisia lactiflora" (white mugwort). Then add sculptural accents with fragrant "Artemisia California montara" (California sagebrush), a gracefully cascading mounding shrub that will grow to two feet tall. Opposite, place "Artemis fiffolia", a small native shrub with airy, feathery foliage. Finally, fill in the remaining sections near the pathways with Artemisias "Silver Mound" and "Canescens", both smallish perennials which, once established, create attractive mounds of silvery gray, feathery foliage.

Artemisias, once established, thrive and expand. You may find gardener friends with older Artemisia beds which they are willing to divide. You might substitute some of the above suggestions with gift plants of similar heights and shapes. You can’t really mismatch Artemisias; the family demands similar culture and location, and the varieties of related foliage will be invariably pleasing.

Other Ideas

There are endless ideas for gardens based in myth and magic. Try a red garden for Mars, or a white one for the Moon. Build a zodiac garden with herbs for each planet. Divide the yard according to the wheel of the year, and create plantings for each festival. Place sculptures and symbols among the plants. Your garden is a magical place already. Let yourself make it even more so!

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Scarecrow Magic

August 27, 2009 at 10:30 am (Autum Equinox, Garden, Mabon, Magic, Moon, pagan, Plants, Protection, Spell, Thursday, Witch)

Scarecrow Magic

Many of us have those fun garden scarecrows – or we may have made our own – in our gardens. These can be enchanted for abundance or protection. You will need your own scarecrow, ideally make one – it can even be a fairy! (but it doesn’t matter if shop bought,) place in your garden.

Do the first spell at a waxing moon for pulling protection to you, or during a waning moon to banish negativity/prowlers. Do at sunset or sun rise. Go to the scarecrow and say three times:

‘Made from straw and old rag clothes
This scarecrow will see more than we know
Ward my garden and protect me, too
Under midnight stars and skies of blue .’

Place your dominant hand on its head and say:

‘By the magic of the harvest this spell is spun
As I will, so mote it be, and let it harm none ‘

For abundance, again do at sunrise or set. Stand beside your scarecrow & say:

‘Jack in the straw bless this garden of mine
By the powers of fire, water, earth, air, and divine
These elements abundance will surely bring
Spin around us now in a multi-colored ring ‘

Visualize the element’s colors spinning around you and the scarecrow as you chant softly over and over

‘Earth, Air, Fire and Water’

holding out your hands, palm up. See it spinning faster and faster, from your ankles up and down, slowly raise your hands to shoulder height raising the energy up with you, when you feel you have raised enough, send it out with a toss of your hand. Crouch on the ground and place hands in soil to ground and center, saying:

‘My magic encircles this space above and below
I ground this spell into the Earth,
May it yield abundance, joy and love
So mote it be ”

Stand up and brush soil off hands….

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This is Your Spell (and Herbal Info) – A Witch’s Garden Grimoire

June 18, 2009 at 10:16 am (Associations, Flowers, Garden, Healing, Herbs, Litha, Lore, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Plants, Spells, Tuesday, Witch)

A Witch’s Garden Grimoire
Unknown source

Midsummer and Gardening go so well together that doing herbal spells is a natural for this Sabbat. This Grimoire contains many herbal charms and spells for many different uses.

Wishing Spells and Charms

  • Calendula: Sprinkle dried bits of this flower under the bed. Makes all dreams come true and protects the sleeper from evil.
  • Dandelion: Sew tightly in a red flannel bag and wear around the neck to make wishes come true.
  • Huckleberry Leaves: Burn in the bedroom before going to sleep to make all dreams come true within seven days.
  • Job’s Tears: As you count out seven seeds, concentrate on a wish you have in mind. Carry these seven seeds with you at all times for seven days and your wish should have come true before the week is gone
  • Lavender: Place some Lavender under your pillow just before retiring and think about your wish. If you dream about anything at all connected with the wish this means that it will come true.
  • Lotus Root: Mark one side of the root Yes and the other side No and then make your wish as you toss the root into the air. You will then know if your wish was meant to be.
  • Spearmint: Write your wish on a piece of paper and wrap in a few Spearmint leaves. Place these in a red cloth and sew it up with red thread. Keep it in a safe and secret place. By the time the scent is gone your wish should have come true. If not, this means that it probably won’t for a long time to come.

Love Spells and Charms

  • Caraway: Protection, Passion. Add to love sachets and charms to attract a lover (physical sense) Carry the seeds to strengthen memory. Especially powerful to Gemini’s.
  • Corn Flowers: Sprinkle in the area where you and your mate argue the most. It is purported that it will help to alleviate discord and strife.
  • Damiana: Let some soak in a glass of wine for three hours. Thereafter sprinkle a small bit outside your front and back doors. Do this faithfully each day for 21 days, and it is said that before long your wandering lover will return to you.
  • Dill Seed: Add a few grains to bath water before going out to meet a person of the opposite sex. Said to make one irresistible.
  • Laurel: Worn by brides to guarantee a long and happy union.
  • Marjoram: To attract a husband, put a little in the corners of each room in your house. Remove and renew about once a month.
  • Orris Root: A love root, carried to attract the opposite sex and to make them love you dearly.
  • Rosemary: Give a special friend a sachet filled with Rosemary. This is supposed to induce warm feelings in another.
  • Skullcap: Supposedly if you place a wee bit in your lover’s shoes it will make that person unaffected by the charms of others.
  • Spikenard: Brew into a tea and wet the picture of a loved one with the water so they will never leave you.
  • Sweet Bugle: Crush a handful and place under your mattress to attract new lovers and possibly marriage prospects.

Protection Spells and Charms

  • Angelica: (root) Protection, Exorcism. Grow in gardens as a protection, Carry the root with you as an amulet. Burn the dried leaves in exorcism rituals.
  • Anise: Protection, Purification. A good, general cleansing bath is made with a handful of Anise seeds and a few Bay leaves. A pillow of Anise keeps away nightmares.
  • Ague Weed: This can be mixed with any incense and burned to break the power of a hex that has been placed on you.
  • Basil: Purification, Protection, Love, Money. Add to money incense, put a pinch of Basil in four corners of you home at the start of each season to bring prosperity your way. It is said that if you grow Basil in your garden, yell and scream at it, to make a strong plant.
  • Bay Leaves: One in the corner of each room of a house is believed to protect all who dwell there, as well as the house itself. If you carry it on your person it is reputed to protect against witchcraft.
  • Bladderwrack: To be carried by the traveler as a protection, especially when traveling by water.
  • Blood Root: Place on windows and doorways to protect against curses and evil spirits from entering.
  • Cinquefoil: Take an egg and cut a small hole in one end. Drain the contents and let the shell dry. Then stuff the shell with Cinquefoil and reseal the hole with tape. As long as this egg is kept in the home it will be protected from evil forces.
  • Clover: Soak one tablespoonful in one cup of vinegar for three days. Then strain and sprinkle the vinegar in each corner of every room. All alien spirits will leave the premises.
  • Elm Bark: To eliminate slander against you bury some in a box along with a piece of paper that contains the name of the individual who is speaking adversely about you.
  • Pearl Moss: Sprinkle this across the front doorway of the home to only allow good spirits to enter (this actually works well in conjunction with the below Sulphur one).
  • Sulphur: Burn at midnight near your back door to ward off evil.

Good luck, Prosperity and Employment Spells and Charms

  • Alfalfa: Kept in the home to protect the owner against poverty.
  • Basil: Soak a heaping teaspoonful in a pint of water. This water is then sprinkled in a place of business to attract money and success. If you have a job interview coming up, you can sprinkle this outside of the building where you hope to be employed (careful though – if someone sees you it won’t help your job prospects very much!).
  • Cascara Sagrada: Used to help win court cases when brewed into a strong tea and sprinkled around the bed the night before a court appearance.
  • Chamomile: Brew and use as a hand wash before playing card games or gambling.
  • Dragon’s Blood Reed: Carry in your purse or pocket for good luck. Here’s a new one on me – supposedly if you place it under your mattress it aids in curing impotency.
  • Galangal Root: One of these carried to court is said to make the judge/jury feel favorably inclined toward you.
  • Irish Moss: Ah, me friends, ’tis said that if one places this under the carpets in their home that it will bring vast fortune.
  • John The Conqueror Root: Just before going out to play a game of chance, wash your hands in water in which it has been boiled.
  • Little John: Place one in Holy water to bring good luck to everything you attempt.
  • Low John Root: It is said that if one wraps money around this root the money will multiply threefold.
  • Silver Leaf: A potent good luck charm when kept in the home.
  • Tonka Beans: Carry with you in a red flannel bag to attract good fortune and financial success. Particularly helpful before a business negotiation or job interview.
  • Violets: Sprinkle some petals in the corners of your home. It is said to invite positive entities that can assist with healing and bringing money and luck unto you.

Health Spells and Charms NOTE: Illness should be treated by a medical professional! None of these are meant to replace the advice, treatment or medication prescribed by a qualified physician. However, it can’t hurt to use them with the proper medical treatment.

  • African Ginger: Place under the pillow to cure a sore throat.
  • Ash Tree Leaves: Place one tablespoonful of leaves in a bowl of water and leave it in the bedroom overnight while sleeping. In the morning it should be tossed out and then redone each night. Allegedly this will help to prevent illness.
  • Betony: Strengthens the body when worn as an amulet.
  • Caraway Seed: Place some in a small, white bag and sew with white thread. Hide in the crib or bed of a child (this means tape it under the bed so there is no possible way a youngster has access to it!) to keep the child free from illness.
  • Coriander: Carry the seeds in a small bag to ward off disease and migraines.
  • Dill Seed: Tie some in a cloth and smell to help cure hiccups
  • Dog Grass: Sprinkle around the house to overcome depression. Do this for seven days and hopefully you will no longer despair.
  • Eucalyptus: Said to protect against colds if stuffed into the pillow one sleeps on.
  • Holy Herb: Use in bath water if you feel your sickness has been caused by a hex.
  • Masterwort: When sprinkled in shoes it is supposed to prevent tiredness and weakness. Mixed with oil and rubbed on the neck should help alleviate neck pain.
  • Mustard Seed: Carry with you at all times a few grains in a small bag, wallet or purse to guard against injury.
  • Quince Seed: When a few are carried in a red, flannel bag it will protect the wearer from physical attacks and harm.
  • Rose Buds: Place around sprains and bad bruises to help them heal quicker.
  • Rue: To relieve a headache lay down with some placed on the forehead. Wear at night next to the heart to regain health from minor illnesses.
  • Rosemary: Holding some while reading or completing tasks is said to improve memory.
  • Thyme: Burn in the home to attract good health to all occupants.
  • Valerian: This sewn into the pillow is supposed to calm nerves and bring about peaceful sleep.
  • Vervain: Worn as an amulet, Vervain is noted for its healing powers in curing fevers and poisoning.

Misc. Spells and Charms

  • Bay Leaves: Protection, clairvoyance, purification, healing. Burn the leaves to induce visions. Wear as an amulet to ward off negativity. Burn and scatter on the floor to purify area. Make a dream pillow of Bay, and put under your bed pillow to induce inspiration and prophetic dreams. For the best power do this with the full moon in Scorpio.
  • Catnip: Chewed by warriors for fierceness in battle. Large dried leaves are powerful markers in magical books. Give to your familiar (cat) to create a psychic bond with the animal.
  • Chamomile: Meditation, relaxation Prosperity. Use in prosperity charms to draw money. Burn as a relaxation incense for meditation. Make a tea with one tablespoon of Chamomile to 8 oz of water, and drink to relax or induce sleep
  • Cinnamon: Prosperity, Passion, Healing. Use in spells for prosperity. Will stimulate and excite the passions of the male. Mix with Myrrh for a good general propose incense. Tie 3 Cinnamon sticks together with a green ribbon and hang on front door of business to bring customers. Lowers blood sugar.
  • Dragons Blood: Energy, Protection, purification. You will know if you have the real thing, if it burns pinkish/red smoke. Put a pinch in with your magical tools, to keep unwanted eyes away
  • Elder Flowers: Sacred to the White Lady and midsummer solstice. The Druids used it to both bless and curse. Burn at Beltane to comfort the Fairies.
  • Frankincense (tears): Burn to raise vibrations, to purify your Magical working area. Burn during sunrise rituals of all kinds. Mix with Cumin for a powerful protective incense useful for all general workings. There is nothing that smells like it, soapy, sensual and the smoke is thick and white.
  • Hops: Wonderful in healing sachets and incenses. A pillow of the dried fruit like buds, helps bring on sleep. String a bunch of the fresh buds and hang in bedroom of sick person, for improvement in health
  • Juniper Berries: Used with Thyme in Druid incense for visions. Juniper berries strewn at the door discourages thieves. The mature berries can be strung and hung in the house to attract love. Crush berries in a mortar to release their pine filled aroma.
  • Lavender Flowers: Love, purification. Used in love sachets and incense. Put 2 handfuls of  Lavender Flowers into a square of cheese cloth and tie with a purple ribbon. Use this aromatic washcloth in place of your usual one. Lavender was thrown into Midsummer fires by witches as a sacrifice to the ancient Gods. Also used as an insect repellent.
  • Life Everlasting Flowers: Purify, protection. Use in charm bags to keep young. Burn at Midsummer to honor the maiden. Bundle flowers with white ribbons and put under pillow to give sweet dreams.
  • Mandrake (Mayapple): Place in the home for a powerful protective charm.The roots are used in image magic, as the American version (Mayapple) and the European version, resemble the limbs of humans.
  • Marigold: Magical attributes include prophesy, legal matters, the psychic, seeing magical creatures, love, clairvoyance, dreams, business or legal affairs and renewing personal energy. Be sure to gather your Marigolds for magical workings at noon. A fresh Marigold flower can be worn to court for a favorable outcome of a trial. If you place Marigold in your mattress, you will have prophetic dreams… and if you place it under your mattress it will make whatever you dream come true. Since the Marigold embodies the sun, it can make a person more attractive and confident. Add Marigold to your bath water to make this happen. A vase of fresh and bright Marigolds in a room brings a renewed surge of life to those in the room. The leaves can be eaten as a salad and a yellow dye has also been extracted from the flower, by boiling.
  • Mistletoe: Protection, love. Wear as a protective amulet. A good anti-lightning charm.Extinguishes fires. Hang Mistletoe and kiss the one you want, hence Kissing under the Mistletoe.
  • Mugwort: Clairvoyance, Scrying, Protection. Rub this herb on Magic Mirrors and Crystal Balls to strengthen their powers. Add to scrying, lairvoyance and divination incenses. Use 3 tablespoons to 1\2 gallon spring (or rain) water to cleanse your Magical Mirrors, crystals and stones. It is used in magic as a love divining herb. To experience interesting dreams that are said to reveal one’s future, stuff a pillow with about a pound of this herb and sleep on it. The Indians used a decoction of the leaves for colds, bronchitis, rheumatism, and fever, and a poultice for wounds. The fresh juice is used to ease the itch of poison oak. To cure a headache, stick a leaf up your nose.
  • Myrrh: Myrrh is used in magic for protection, peace, exorcism, healing, consecration, blessing, meditation and heightening spirituality. As an incense Myrrh can be used to help deepen mediation and to aid contemplation. Myrrh can be used in any ritual to the Goddess Isis, since Myrrh is a Goddess plant of the moon’s sphere and is sacred to Isis. Myrrh can also be burned so that its smoke can purify and protect an area, and the smoke can also be used to consecrate and bless objects like rings, amulets, and ritual tools.
  • Passionflower: Passionflower has uses in protection and love magic. When Passionflower is used, it calms and brings peace to the home. You can sprinkle dried or fresh Passionflower over the doorsteps of your house or apartment to keep harm away. If you carry some of the herb in an amulet bag, you will make friends easier since it will work to increase your personal charisma making you more attractive and more likable. Place Passionflower in a dream pillow and it will help you get a good nights sleep. Place it in power bundles and use in love spells to attract love. You can also burn it as an incense to promote understanding.
  • Pennyroyal: Put in the shoes to prevent weariness. Add to summer incenses and to prevent getting lost in the woods. Tie it to your bedpost to keep mosquitoes away. It is said to make one more aware and alert, and increase brain power. Brings peace between husband and wife when kept in a small bowl on a table or a dresser in the home. Carry Pennyroyal when traveling by water and never know the pangs of seasickness.
  • Rose: Rose is known as the herb of love. Add Rose bud petals to bath water to conjure up a lover. Put red Rose petals in a red velvet bag and pin this under your clothes to attract love – or you can wear Rosehips as beads to bring love to you. Rose oil and Rose incense are both used in love spells. If you wash your hands with Rose water before mixing love potions, the potions will be stronger. Different color Roses have different meanings so you can use Roses to give someone a message magically. These are what the different Rose colors mean:
    • Red: love you
    • White: I love you not
    • Yellow: I love another
    • Moss: I admire you from afar
    • Pink: My love for you is innocent
    • Orange: I love you vigorously
    • Amethyst: I will love you forever
    • Wild: I love you because you are fair and innocent
  • Rosemary: Wear a chaplet of Rosemary to aid in the memory. A good protective sachet for boat and ship passengers. Make a fresh wreath of rosemary for protection, hang in the home. Burn Rosemary and Juniper for a recuperation incense. Use for remembrance in Samhain rituals.
  • Sage: Burn to purify a ritual area or magical tools. Used as a main ingredient in smudge sticks and herb bundles. Put in with Tarot cards or Runes to protect and keep clean. Sage is used for fertility, longevity, wishes, wisdom, protection, money attraction, purification, healing, and health magic. Sage that is being gathered for magical use should not be cut with a metal knife or athame. It is said that if you eat Sage you will become more wise and also immortal. Sage is often an herb used at handfastings since it will help bring about a long life and domestic virtue for the happy couple. Sage can be added to almost any healing spell. A good healing amulet may be made by putting a clove of Garlic, a bit of Eucalyptus and Cinnamon, two pinches of Sage and one pinch of Saffron into a small blue bag. This bag can then be worn or carried to promote healing.
  • St. Johns Wort: Noted for its calming effect, valuable for nervous disorders such as insomnia, depression and bedwetting. The oil has remarkable soothing and healing action when rubbed into painful joints and strained muscles. Celtic tradition held that the druids wore it in battle for invincibility. Burn to exorcise negative spirits. Make a tea with 1 tablespoon to 8 oz of water, for a strong antidote for depression.
  • Thistle (Blessed): Thistle has great value in protection spells and also is used to bring spiritual and financial blessings. If Thistle is thrown into a fire, it will protect the thrower from being struck by lightning during summer storms. Thistle can be carried in an amulet bag for joy, energy, vitality, and protection – in fact men who carry Thistle become better lovers! Thistle can be burned as an incense for protection and also to counteract hexing. Thistle powder can also be added to ritual baths to give added protection. Thistle can be grown in the garden to ward of those dreaded vegetable thieves, and a bowl of fresh Thistle will give off such good strengthening energies that it is the perfect thing to have in a sickroom. Thistle is a wonderful material to use to make magic wands for spirit conjuring and magical walking sticks. In England, the wizards of old were said to select the tallest thistle and use it as a wand or walking stick.
  • Valerian: Love, Harmony. Use in love spells and to keep fighting couples together. Use in a bath sachet for a calming effect. Valerian has been used to treat nervous tension and panic attacks. Use 1 tablespoon to 8 oz water for a calming tea.
  • Wormwood: Throw onto fires on Samhain to gain protection from the spirits roaming the night. One of the major ingredients in Absinthe. Burn in incense to raise spirits.
  • Yarrow: Love, Clairvoyance. Used in love sachets and marriage charms, as it has the power to keep a couple together happily for seven years. Worn as an amulet it wards of negativity. A tea made of 1 tablespoon to 8 oz of water will enhance one’s powers of perception. Held in the hand it stops all fear. The beautiful flowers are a welcome addition to any magical altar. Yarrow has been nicknamed A Witch’s Best Friend.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Wednesday What Herb is This – Fairy Dream Pillow

June 17, 2009 at 10:59 am (Associations, Dreams, Fae, Faery, Fairies, Fairy, Garden, Herbs, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Plants, Wednesday, Witch)

Rose Petals
Sacred to Aphrodite, Venus, Cupid, and Bacchus. Used in rituals to honor the Goddess. Represented joy to the Romans. Rose flower tea induces prophetic dreams if you drink it at bedtime. Rose petal and hips are used in healing spells and mixtures. Rose petals sprinkled around the house calm personal stress and household upheavals.

Primroses
Generates positive energy and dispels negative energies. Used as a tea it is a useful magical tonic. Aids those afraid of the dark, prevents nightmares, and protects against the evils of the night. Sew into a sleep pillow for these purposes. Carried to attract love. Protects soldiers in battle. Scattered about the home it brings happiness.

Bay Leaves
Sacred to Apollo. Leaves can be used as amulets or in amulet bags for protection. Protection, purification, exorcism, prophetic dreams, strength, protects against poltergeists and lightning. Attracts love.

Lavender
Love, protection, healing, sleep, chastity, purification, and peace. The oil is worn to attract the opposite sex. The flowers are put in sleep pillows, purification and peace incenses. Used in healing mixtures. When combined with rosemary it was believed to preserve chastity.

Milkweed
Sacred to Bacchus, Indra, Soma. For rituals to increase creativity or to ensure a long life, this herb is indispensable.

 

Faery Dream Pillow
Created by Moon ©1998-Y2k

Needed:

  • Velvet, velveteen or satin fabric
  • White or silver thread
  • Rose Petals
  • Primroses
  • Fresh bay leaves
  • Lavender
  • Milkweed pod – silky tassels

Cut out two squares of fabric approximately 6 inches square. Sew around three sides of the squares with the thread.

Mix in a bowl:

  • Rose Petals (two parts)
  • Primroses (one part)
  • Bay leaves, fresh (one part)
  • Lavender (one part )
  • Milkweed pod silky tassels (two parts)

Turn the pillow inside out so that the seams don’t show, stuff the pillow with your herb mixture. While you are stuffing it, say something like:

Milkweed, milkweed
Flying to and fro,
Secret Faery pod,
Where wishes grow & grow.
Whisper and chant
Our happy magic charm,
Hung in the garden,
Keep us safe from harm.

Sew up the end so that the herbs stay in the pillow. You can then decorate the pillow if you want with lace or silk, or embroider with designs, etc. Take this pillow to bed with you at night and put it under your pillow. This not only smells great but will help you to have dreams of the fey.

Note: After six months these pillows may lose their "fresh" scent. You can reuse them by emptying out the old contents and refilling them with new herbs.

Magical Associations from Full Moon Herbs 

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Thursday This Is Your Spell – Garden Magick For Litha: Three Spells

June 4, 2009 at 11:38 am (Blessing, Garden, Holly, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Plants, Spells, Thursday, Witch)

Garden Magick For Litha: Three Spells
Source Unknown

As Litha is a celebration of the God’s power and blessings on the crops, Garden Spells are popular at this time.

An old spell against weeds – (This hasn’t worked for me yet, but I found it in an old book of folklore and home remedies and it was interesting, so I’m including it.):

Under a waning moon, break a leaf from your garden’s tallest weed. Crush it between your teeth (Make sure it’s not poisonous, of course!) and spit it upon the earth, saying:

"Malum Depuo, Hostem Veneno Caedo Caedo."

(I have no idea the translation or exact pronunciation of this, as I said, it was in an old book). Cut off the rest of the weed stalk or stem with a Boline or silver knife and spread a handful of salt over the hidden weed root. All the garden bears witness to the act and it’s enemies must then withdraw.

A Chant for an Herb Garden on Solstice – Most every Witch has at least a small herb garden – this is a wonderful little chant to be said over your herb garden on the Solstice sunrise. I like to say it while watering my Herbs, too.

"Thyme and sage for sore throats, rosemary to darken hair,
Bergamot to make a tea, flax for me to wear.
Cecily for sour fruit, lemon balm a cake,
Chive to mix with salad and egg, Mint a thirst to slake.
The Wise Women of old with loving care
Grew herbs and gave poor folk a share,
And cottage gardens still are found
Where natures’ medicines abound."

A Litha prayer for the Earth – Say:

"Great God, Father of the Earth,
Shine down on this, your strongest day.
Blessed Goddess who gave us Birth,
Bless us who honor your ancient way.
As Summer’s light falls to the ground,
lending crops and trees it’s power,
the Summer winds blow warm and round,
touching the corn silk and the flowers.
We give you thanks, our Mother Earth,
We praise you, fire of the Sun.
We dance this Solstice day with Mirth,
from dawns’ first light ’till the day is done."

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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