Tuesday Try A New Taste – Minted Summer Salad

June 15, 2010 at 9:06 am (Cooking, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Vegetarian, Witch)

Minted Summer Salad
From
The Recipe Club

Ingredients for salad:

  • 1 small can pineapple slices, drained
  • 4 firm ripe tomatoes, thickly sliced
  • 1 large cucumber
  • Chopped Mint

Ingredients for dressing:

  • 2 Tbs finely chopped mint
  • 1/3 cup white vinegar
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • salt and pepper

For salad: Cut pineapple slices into large pieces. Score cucumber with a fork and slice thinly. Put tomatoes, pineapple and cucumber in a bowl. Pour over prepared dressing; toss well. Refrigerate. Before serving sprinkle over with chopped mint.

For dressing: Put mint and vinegar in a small saucepan; bring to the boil. Reduce heat and simmer 1 minutes. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. When cold, strain into a screw-top jar, add oil, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Shake well.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Cream of Sun-Dried Tomato Soup

May 25, 2010 at 9:27 am (Cooking, Herbs, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Vegetarian, Witch)

Cream of Sun-Dried Tomato Soup
from World Wide Recipes

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbs olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 2 ribs celery, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 4 cups vegetable stock (or chicken stock / non-vegetarian version)
  • 4 cups chopped ripe tomatoes or canned Italian tomatoes, drained
  • 1 large potato, peeled and diced
  • 1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes (not in oil)
  • 1 Tbs chopped fresh basil or 1 tsp dried
  • 1 cup milk, half and half, or heavy cream
  • Sugar, salt, and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • Chopped chives for garnish

Heat the olive oil in a large pot over moderate heat. Add the onion, celery, carrot, and garlic and sauté until tender but not brown, about 5 minutes. Add the stock, tomatoes, potato, sun-dried tomatoes, and basil. Bring to a boil and simmer covered for 20 minutes, until the vegetables are tender. Puree in a food processor or blender in small batches until smooth, straining through a fine sieve if desired. Stir in the milk or cream and season with sugar, salt, and pepper. Serve garnished with chopped chives.
Serves 6 to 8.

 

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Mead and How To Make It

May 18, 2010 at 9:50 am (Asatru, Cooking, Honey, Litha, Magic, Mead, Midsummer, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Witch)

Mead and How To Make It
posted by Aradiann

Mead, or honey wine, is probably one of the most ancient known alcoholic beverages known to mankind. Making good mead is not difficult, so long as you keep your equipment perfectly clean and you use the best available ingredients. As for legalities, its perfectly legal as long as you brew it non-commercially and entirely for the use of you and your friends.

You can find a recipe for non-alcoholic mead here.

Here’s what you need…

Equipment:

  • One gallon jug
  • Brewing pot, 4 to 6 quarts (steel or enamel, not aluminum)
  • Clear glass primary fermenter, 6 quart
  • Fermentation lock and stopper
  • Wire mesh tea strainer (used for skimming the froth from the mead when you boil it)
  • Long-handled brewing spoon, plastic (if you use a wooden one, you must boil it every time you make a new batch of mead)
  • Racking cane
  • Plastic siphon hose, about 3 ft. long and intended for handling foods
  • bottle brushes, assorted sizes
  • Bottles (recycled wine bottles will do)
  • Plastic Funnel
  • Corks (for the bottles)
  • Bottle capper/cork compressor
  • Sulphite Tablets, to terminate fermentation before final bottling (optional)

Explanation of Equipment:

  • One gallon jug – Your typical "MoonShine" jug
  • Brewing pot – any large pot will do, as long as its not aluminum (poisonous)
  • Clear glass primary fermenter – Your typical "Moon Shine" jug
  • Fermentation lock and stopper – A small device that fits upon the top of the jug. It allows the gases from fermentation to escape while preventing air and dust from entering you jug.
  • Wire mesh tea strainer – self explanatory
  • Long handled brewing spoon, plastic – Any long handled spoon as long as its clean
  • Racking cane – (see fig. 1) It’s a long tube that has a cap on one end and a hole about inch from the bottom on the other end. The siphon hose attaches to the cap, and the end with the hole is inserted into jug. The purpose of this device is to siphon the mead from the sediment without aerating the brew and exposing it to airborne bacteria (which will quickly destroy your mead)

||=========

|| FIG.1

|| ———————- Racking cane

||

||

|O| ———————- Hole at the bottom

|__|

  • Siphon hose, plastic – used for transporting the mead from one jug to another, use a hose made for handling food
  • Bottle brushes, assorted – brushes on the end of wire handles
  • Bottles – Recycled wine bottles will do ( make sure that they are cleaned and preferable have been boiled and have been allowed to cool)
  • Funnel – every household has at least one ( Don’t use the one you use to add oil to your car…)
  • Corks – Self explanatory (don’t use old corks)
  • Bottle capper/ cork compressor – for putting the corks into your bottles

Ingredients for Mead:

  • 2 quarts of water (purified, bottled, or distilled water is best)
  • 2 1/2 lbs Honey
  • 1/2 cup lemon peels ( Alternate: 3 teaspoons of Malic Acid)
  • 1 tablespoon strong tea (Alternate: 1 1/2 teaspoons Tartaric Acid)
  • 1/4 teaspoon Grape Tannin
  • 1 teaspoon yeast energizer
  • 1 packet mead yeast ( Alternate: Champagne yeast, Montrachet yeast, Tokay wine yeast)

Makes 1 gallon of mead. All items can be found at your local Brewers shop, check the yellow pages. Stir the honey and water together, heating slowly. Stir in the lemon peel and tea (or the malic and tartaric acid). When it gets hot, stir in the grape tannin and the yeast energizer. Most brewers will then bring the brew to a full boil, though this is not really necessary. Use the tea strainer to skim off the froth that rises to the top. Let it cool for a while, then "rack" or pour into your primary fermenter and let the brew cool overnight. The next day, carefully pour it through the strainer into your gallon fermentation jug. "Pitch" or add the yeast, stirring a packet of yeast into four ounces of 80° water (more or less), let it sit for about 10 minutes and then stir it into your brew. Carefully move your jug into a dark, moderate-temperature place where it will be completely undisturbed, and put on the fermentation lock. Make sure you set the jug into a large bowl or pan of some sort to catch the foam-off that occurs during the first few days of fermentation, and clean it up after a few days. Otherwise the bottle shouldn’t be touched except when absolutely necessary.

After a few days the mead will start to clear, and there will be a good bit of sediment at the bottom of the jug. "rack" (siphon) the mead into another jug, being careful to leave the sediment behind. Then top off the jug (with the mead) with distilled or purified water, and reattach the fermentation lock. Clean out the jug with the sediment. If after a week or two the mead again has sediment, rack it again into another bottle. It’s a good idea to check monthly for sediment, and re-rack if there’s more then a trace. When your mead has gone for a month without sediment, it’s ready to be bottled and corked. At this point many brewers prefer to terminate any residual fermentation by adding a sulphite tablet, crushed and dissolved into two ounces of water and then stirred into the gallon of mead. After allowing the mead to set overnight, it is funneled into bottles and corked. If you don’t want to use the sulphite tablets, you must make sure that all fermentation has ceased, or you might have a few of the bottles explode from pressure build up caused by residual fermentation. Let your mead age for three months or more. Then when the mood strikes you, pop open a bottle and enjoy! 🙂

Tips:

  • Malic acid, citric acid, or grape tannin will hasten the fermentation
  • Unless you pick the lemons your self, soak the store bought lemons in hot water for a few minutes to remove wax, dirt, and insecticide contaminates
  • Mead making takes time, BE PATIENT!!!!
  • While fermentation is taking place, the mead will become very cloudy. Sometimes it will clear up, and then become cloudy once again as secondary fermentation takes place.
  • As a general rule of thumb, the mead should be ready for bottling when you have been able to read newsprint through a gallon jug of it for at least two weeks (If you used a dark variety of honey, then your mead will be dark and this rule doesn’t apply, instead shine a flashlight through it, if you see that the mead is clear and has been for at least two weeks, then its probably ready for bottling)
  • Find a good area around your house or garage where you can leave your brewing jugs safe and undisturbed, with a temperature range of 55 to 85°  Fahrenheit.
  • Get your honey from a Bee Keeper, if possible; if not buy it at the supermarket and make sure its RAW honey (processed honey sucks for making mead) The darker the honey the better the mead will taste!

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Apfelpfannkuchen (German Apple Pancakes)

May 11, 2010 at 7:27 am (Apple, Breads, Cookies, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Witch)

Apfelpfannkuchen (German Apple Pancakes)
From Red Deer’s & Elenya’s

Ingredients:

  • 2 large Apples, any cooking variety
  • 1/4 cup Butter
  • 1 cup Flour
  • 1 cup Milk
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon Nutmeg,
  • Confectioners sugar

Preheat oven to 475. Peel, core and very thinly slice the apples: you should have approximately 1-1/2 cups. Melt 3 Tablespoons of the butter over medium low heat in a small fry pan, and sauté the apples until they are just tender. Keep apples warm while preparing the batter. Place a 9 or 10 inch cast-iron skillet in the oven to heat for at least 5 minutes – the pan has to be very hot for this to work. When it is well heated, add the remaining 2Tsp. of butter to melt and put the skillet back in the oven; the butter should be very hot buy not brown when you add the apples and the batter. Place the flour, milk, vanilla, salt and nutmeg in a blender and whirl until smooth. Remove the skillet from the oven, quickly arrange the warm apple slices over the melted butter, and pour the batter evenly over all. Bake for 15 min., reduce heat to 375 and bake 10 minutes longer. The pancake will puff and climb up the sides of the pan. Sprinkle with confectioner’s sugar, then cut in wedges and serve with maple syrup.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Midsummer Eve’s Pasta

May 4, 2010 at 9:08 am (Associations, Cooking, Litha, Magic, Midsummer, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Witch)

Midsummer Eve’s Pasta (Vermicelli Alla Sangiovannello)
Recipe by: Flavors of Pulgia, by Nancy Harmon Jenkins

In years past, on the night of June 24, the Feast of St. John or San Giovanni, true Baresi celebrated Midsummer’s Eve by taking their tables outside and dining in the streets or on overhanging balconies from which they could call to each other and carry on conversations and flirtations. "True" Baresi are denizens of the old town, living in the crowded warren of narrow streets and alleys and overarching white-washed walls that still curl like a North African medina around the harbor’s edge beside the beautiful twelfth-century church of the city’s protector, St. Nicholas of Nyra, now of Bari.  On this, the longest day of the year, the traditional dish served is vermicelli, spaghetti, or penne with a simple sauce of oil, garlic, anchovies, and tomatoes. Some add capers, some hot chile peppers and parsley, some olives, either black or green, but the basic idea is a quick, fresh, simple dish that celebrates the flavors of summer.

Ingredients

  • 3 salted anchovies or 6 oil-packed anchovy fillet
  • 1 garlic clove, chopped
  • 1/3 c extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 lb fresh red ripe tomatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 1 freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1/2 sm dried hot red chile pepper or 1/4 ts crushed red pepper
  • flakes
  • 1 tb capers
  • 1/3 pitted and chopped black or green olives
  • 2/3 c finely chopped flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • salt to taste
  • 1 lb spaghetti, vermicelli, or penne

If you are using salted anchovies, rinse them thoroughly under running water and strip away their bones. Then chop them coarsely. (If you are using oil-packed anchovy fillets, simply chop them.) In a large saucepan over medium-low heat, gently sweat the garlic in the oil. When the garlic is soft, add the anchovies and cook, stirring with a fork and pressing the anchovies to dissolve them in the oil. Add the chopped tomatoes and cook just long enough to soften them and release their juices. Add black pepper and, if you wish, the pepper flakes, and cook a few minutes more to blend the flavors. Stir in any of or all of the other possible ingredients – capers, olives, and parsley, reserving a little parsley for a garnish.

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a rolling boil. Drop in the pasta and cook until almost done – about 10 minutes. Drain the pasta and turn it into the pan with the sauce. Stir to mix well and let the pasta finish cooking in the sauce, another 2 minutes. Turn into a heated serving bowl, garnish with parsley, and serve immediately.
Yield: 6 Servings.

 

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Beltane Bread

April 27, 2010 at 9:36 am (Baking, Beltane, Breads, Magic, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Witch)

Beltane Bread
from Ann Moura (Aoumiel)’s book
"
Green Witchcraft: Folk Magic, Fairy Lore & Herb Craft"

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups sifted flour
  • 1/2 cup ground almonds
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 tube almond paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 5 eggs

Preheat oven to 375 degrees, and combine above ingredients. When dough is worked to medium soft, shape into flattened balls and place on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake until golden brown, about 20 minutes. Cool, ice with white Solar Cross. You could try this as a single loaf. I also like to make an almond biscuit with biscuit mix, almond extract, sugar, cinnamon, and eggs, but in smaller proportions. (A lot of my cooking is unmeasured, which doesn’t help for making recipes.)

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Iced Espresso Brownies (Adult Recipe, kinda…)

April 20, 2010 at 9:58 am (Baking, Beltane, Cooking, Magic, Recipe, Tuesday, Witch)

Iced Espresso Brownies
From the Godiva Chocolatier Web site

Ingredients:

  • 7 ounces Swiss dark chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 10 tablespoons (1 stick plus 2 tablespoons) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup unsweetened alkalized cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 6 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 ½ cups granulated sugar

Chocolate Kahlúa icing Ingredients:

  • 4 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 2 ounces unsweetened chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 1 ½ cups heavy cream
  • ¼ Cup light corn syrup
  • 4 tablespoons ( ½ stick) unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 tablespoons Kahlúa liqueur
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 cups confectioners’ sugar

Assembly Ingredient:

  • 1 cup confectioners’ sugar

Garnish (optional):

  • 3 ounces white chocolate, melted
  • Fresh raspberries
  • Decors

Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees (F). Line a 15 ½ " x 10 ½ " jelly roll pan with aluminum foil so that the foil extends 2 inches beyond the two short sides of the pan. Fold the overhang underneath the pan. Butter the bottom and sides of the foil-lined pan. In the top of a double boiler set over hot, not simmering, water, melt the chocolate with the butter, stirring frequently until smooth. Remove the top part of the double boiler from the bottom. Transfer the melted chocolate mixture to a small bowl; stir in the vanilla extract. Let the chocolate mixture cool for 10 to 15 minutes, until tepid.

Meanwhile, sift together the flour, cocoa, espresso powder and salt and set aside. In the 4 ½ -quart bowl of a heavy-duty electric mixer using the wire whip attachment, beat the eggs at high speed until frothy. While continuing to beat, add the sugar in a steady stream. Continue beating 3 to 5 minutes, or until the mixture is pale yellow and forms a thin ribbon when the wire whip is lifted. Add the chocolate mixture and mix until blended. Using a rubber spatula, scrape down the side of the bowl. With a rubber spatula or a large balloon whisk, gently fold the sifted flour mixture into the egg mixture one-third at a time, until just combined. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top with a rubber spatula. Bake the brownies for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted 2 inches away from the center comes out with a few moist crumbs clinging to it. Do not overbake the brownies. Cool the brownies in the pan, set on a wire rack, for 20 minutes. Invert the brownies onto a cutting board lined with parchment paper Remove the pan and carefully peel off the foil. Place the cutting board in the freezer and freeze the brownies for 45 minutes.

Make the Kahlua Icing: Meanwhile, melt the chocolates according to the Chocolate Melting Tips. Transfer the melted chocolate to a large bowl and set aside. In a medium saucepan, combine the heavy cream, corn syrup and butter. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until the butter melts and the mixture comes to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat; stir in the Kahlua and vanilla extract. Sift the confectioners’ sugar over the mixture; using a wire whisk, blend in the sugar until smooth. Stir the cream mixture into the chocolate mixture, whisking until the mixture is homogeneous. Cover the surface of the chocolate Kahlua icing with plastic wrap and set aside at room temperature.

Assemble and ice the brownies: Remove the cutting board from the freezer. Place the confectioners’ sugar in a tall plastic container. Dip various shaped jelly cutters into the confectioners’ sugar, coating the entire inside of the cutter; tap out the excess on the insides of the container. Cut out 45 pairs of espresso brownies, dipping and tapping before each cut. (If the design points of the cutters become clogged with brownie, use a toothpick to dislodge.) Discard or snack on the brownie trimmings. Stack each pair of brownies crust-side-down. Remove one heaping tablespoon of the chocolate Kahlua icing and place it in a small cup. Using a small artist’s paintbrush, spread some of the icing, acting as glue, between the pairs, so that they stick together, to form two layers. Arrange the stacked brownies on a wire rack and place the rack in the freezer for 5 minutes. Remove the wire rack from the freezer. Set the wire rack over a baking sheet to catch the excess icing. Using a small ladle, ladle the icing over the top of each brownie, and using a small metal offset spatula, smooth the icing around the sides. Put the wire rack with the iced espresso brownies in the freezer and freeze for 45 minutes, or until the icing is set. Decorate the tops of the iced espresso brownies with melted white chocolate, raspberries or decors, if desired. Store the iced espresso brownies in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to five days.

Yield: Approximately 45 brownies.
Preparation: 50 minutes plus baking, cooling, freezing and setting times.
Special Equipment: Miniature aspic or jelly cutters (see Note).

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Springtime Pasta Salad

April 13, 2010 at 9:19 am (Beltane, Cooking, Magic, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Vegetarian, Witch)

Springtime Pasta Salad
From the National Pasta Association

Ingredients:

  • 16 ozs spaghetti, thin – cooked
  • 1 ½ c frozen broccoli cuts – thawed and cooked
  • ½ c onions – chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic – chopped fine
  • 2 c frozen green peas – thawed
  • ½ c bell peppers – chopped
  • 8 ozs mushrooms – sliced
  • ¼ c parsley

Dressing Ingredients:

  • 3 tbsps white vinegar
  • 3 tbsps lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp prepared mustard
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 2 tsps salt
  • ½ tsp basil
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • ½ tsp thyme
  • ¼ tsp black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper

Prepare spaghetti according to package directions; drain. In a large pot, cook broccoli in boiling water until crisp yet tender, about 4 minutes. Drain and add to pasta. Add onions, garlic, peas, bell peppers, mushrooms, and parsley to pasta. To prepare dressing, combine vinegar, lemon juice, mustard, oil, salt, basil, oregano, thyme, black pepper, and cayenne pepper in a mixing bowl. Pour dressing over pasta mixture and toss gently until well mixed.

Per serving: 276 Calories;
2 g Fat (7% calories from fat);
11 g Protein;
53 g. Carbohydrate;
0 mg Cholesterol;
660 mg Sodium
Serves: 8

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Tuesday try A New Taste – Spinach Cheese Tortellini in Puréed Vegetable Sauce

April 6, 2010 at 9:41 am (Beltane, Cooking, Magic, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Vegetarian, Witch)

Spinach Cheese Tortellini in Puréed Vegetable Sauce
Exported from MasterCook

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound cheese and/or spinach tortellini
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 teaspoon crushed garlic
  • 1 cup finely diced carrots
  • 1 cup finely diced zucchini
  • 1 ½ cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • salt and pepper – to taste

Cook pasta in boiling water according to package directions or until firm to the bite. Drain and place in serving bowl. In small nonstick skillet, melt butter; add garlic, carrots, and zucchini. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook until tender, approximately 8 minutes. Add stock and basil; simmer on medium heat for 5 minutes. Purée in food processor on and off for 30 seconds. Pour over pasta. Season with salt and pepper. Add cheese and toss.

Serving Size: 6

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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Tuesday Try A New Taste – Dandelion Muffins

March 30, 2010 at 9:11 am (Beltane, Cooking, Dandelion, Flowers, Magic, pagan, Recipe, Tuesday, Witch)

Dandelion Muffins
Recipe taken from Native Harvests (author unknown)
and The Dandelion Celebration by Peter Gail

Ingredients:

  • 2 c flour
  • 2 t baking powder
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 c dandelion flower petals
  • 1/4 c vegetable oil
  • 1/4 c honey
  • 1 beaten egg
  • 1 1/2 c milk

Combine flour, baking powder, salt & flower petals. In separate bowl, combine oil, honey, egg & milk. Mix liquids with dry ingredients, stir just to moisten. Spoon into oiled muffin tins and bake in a 400 degree oven for 20-25 minutes.

Fair Use Notice: This page may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. This website distributes this material without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. We believe this constitutes a fair use of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 U.S.C § 107.

Disclaimer: No one involved in this blog or its contents may be held responsible for any adverse reactions arising from following any of the instructions/recipes on this list. It is the reader’s personal responsibility to exercise all precautions and use his or her own discretion if following any instructions or advice from this blog.

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